Afternoon Shift

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A daily conversation about news, culture and ideas.

Mar. 14, 2012

Being trapped is a terrible feeling. On today's Afternoon Shift, we'll hear about the problems that come with imprisonment -- they're certainly different if you're former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich. And more on entrapment: are we stuck with super PACs, nuclear technology and the Bears we've been dealt?

Listen to Hour one of Afternoon Shift

 

Jail Housing Inmates for Phone Fees: You’re pinched, you need to make phone calls, the county charges you out the wazoo, the money goes into the county’s general fund, you never see the money back even if you’re innocent/released. WBEZ's Rob Wildeboer has more. And he takes your calls at 312-923-9239. 

IL Campaign Finance: Two sections of Illinois campaign finance law aimed at reining in political action committees were struck down by a federal judge in Chicago yesterday. The ruling could lead to super PACs coming to Illinois.

Clever Apes: As we observe the 1st anniversary of the Fukushima nuclear crisis, we reflect on Chicago’s deep but contradictory nuclear history. It is both the birthplace of nuclear technology, and in many ways, the birthplace of nuclear skepticism.

Grin and Bear: The Chicago Bears have been known for their vetting process when it comes to players, rejecting those with any potential baggage. Not the case with yesterday’s signing. Is there a shift in philosophy at Halas Hall?

Listen to Hour two of Afternoon Shift

 

Cultural Corner: WBEZ’s Alison Cuddy talks about the potential rezoning and demise of the Portage Theater. Plus, what direction the revamped Chicago Dept. of Cultural Affairs and Special Events (DCASE) is headed. Also joining the conversation, Commissioner Michelle Boone from DCASE.

Blago Prison Primer: As former Governor Rod Blagojevich prepares for a long stay behind bars, we talk with three public officials who know what it’s like “on the inside”. Scott Fawell, Jim Laski and Betty Loren-Maltese give us a prison primer, and talk about getting their lives back on track once they’ve done their time.