Chicago in the national news: 10/14

October 14, 2010

Rahm has one less opponent in Chicago's mayoral race. Politico says Luis Gutierrez has decided not to run, claiming he'd like to stay in Congress and work on immigration reform. There's never a dull moment in Chicago politics. In addition to Guittierez's announcement, Chicago is talking about the unfortunate typo on‚  gubernatorial Green Party candidate Rich Whitney's ballot. In almost half of Chicago's 50 wards -wards that are predominately black according to CBS News - the candidate is identified as Rich Whitey. Not all is lost, according to The New York Post, who points out that Whitney's name is only misspelled when voters review their selection, but not on the initial ballot. Somehow that's not a huge consolation. Naturally Gawker has weighed in, calling it a conspiracy masterminded by the Democrats. Seattle Pi believes the incident is further proof that wealthy, Caucasian men control politics. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama was in town promoting Illinois Democrats running for Congress in next month's election.‚  As The Wall Street Journal reports, the first lady led by example this morning when she cast her vote early at Chicago's Martin Luther King Community Center and encouraged others to do the same. Sometime soon Chicagoans might be able to get some peace and quiet on their daily commute says The UPI. Metra train employees are toying with the idea of creating cars that ban cell phones. Right now they are attempting to gauge the need for such trains and contemplating how enforcing such a thing would work. Any suggestions? If Hollywood rag Variety is to be believed, we might be seeing Chicago mobster Sam Giancana on the small screen. The mobster-turned-FBI-informant was also a single father, raising two daughters before he was‚  murdered in his own home. And in keeping with the Chicago theme of this blog post, one of the project's producers, Ted Field, used to own the Sun Times.