Daily Rehearsal: TJ Miller hits the comments section of Chicagoist

November 8, 2011

1. The Jeff Awards were last night! Didn't it seem like they were super recent? Those were the Non-Equity Jeffs, these are the Equity Jeffs, and never the twain shall meet. Hedy Weiss won her special award, with big wins to Candide and The Madness of King George. Check out the full list of winners here.

2. An AP feature on the new Second City show History of Chicago, previewing in December, starts off with lots of fun ways to describe the city: It's cold. There's political corruption. Etc. Etc. But it does give us a hint at the type of work that the new UP theater will be showing. Second City "has partnered with the Chicago History Museum, consulting with curators, performing a series of workshops and soliciting suggestions from audience members to shape a script that will touch on the present and the past." They actually rehearsed at the Chicago History Museum, the only real place to experience history.

3. Over the weekend, Chicagoist called out TJ Miller's upcoming Comedy Central special TJ Miller: No Real Reason, which airs this weekend. Author Samantha Abernethy also included a video of Miller performing on Conan. "He doesn't exactly tackle cutting edge comedy topics," Abernethy wrote, "but who doesn't love a well executed airplane bit?" Miller responded to the comment -- and it seems like it's actually him, given that it's linked to his Twitter account -- with the following:

4. Lucia Mauro talked about Eiko & Koma's dance installation Naked at the MCA, as well as AXIS Dance Company's performances at the Auditorium Theatre, on Eight Forty-Eight this morning.

5.  The Chicago Arts Orchestra's first concert of the season, in conjunction with the City Voices Chorus, "Masters of the 20th and 21st Centuries" is on November 19. There will also be a talk at the Curtain Call Club (a place I didn't know existed) the night before in the Athenaeum Theater (a place I did know existed) where Jesse Revenig, a doctoral candidate at Northwestern University, will talk about composers Samuel Barber and Benjamin Britten (whose work will be featured in the performance) "in relation to sexuality - particularly the fact that these composers lived as openly gay in a time where this was not acceptable."

Questions? Tips? Email kdries@wbez.org.