Daily Rehearsal: Offensive comments about a not-vulgar-enough musical

November 15, 2011

1. Route 66 got press for Rahm Emanuel attending A Twist of Water, but Kelly Kleiman thinks they have bigger news yet: Fran Guinan of Steppenwolf and Janet Ulrich Brooks (mostly of TimeLine) will be reading a new play called Goldfish by John Kolvenbach November 29 at 7:30. "They really ARE two of the town's best actors," she says, in response to the press release.  You may know Guinan from a smaller screen but a bigger venue; his latest role is as Governor of Illinois on Boss.

2. Court Theatre and the Classical Entertainment Society host The Homerathon, a 24-hour reading of Homer's Iliad, at Court this weekend, Sunday through Monday. Sounds...fun (and very UChicago). Food, (non-)alcoholic beverages and activities included. According to Dramaturg Drew Dir, “We’re going to read every word of Homer’s Iliad until it’s finished—that’s 15,693 lines of verse, or about twenty-four hours of active reading." He continues: "Of course, we’ve invited readers to read in any language or translation they choose— one of the faculty members, for example, is reading from his favorite translation, a translation by eighteenth-century English poet Alexander Pope. We’ve also invited participants to read it in the original ancient Greek, which many here at the University of Chicago are more than prepared to do.” If you want to read or watch, RSVP to Ryan Mease at rmease@gmail.com.

3. Here's a classy, classy photo of Holland Taylor, Loretta Swit and Rosie O'Donnell at Ann. Oh to be a fly on the wall of that conversation...

4. Michael Kaiser, President of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, hates critics. The best comment on his piece? "'The problem with quotes (or reviews) on the internet is that it is difficult to determine whether they are genuine.' - Abraham Lincoln."

5. Street Tempo Theatre Co. is starting to get some buzz for Let My People Come! A Sexual Musical, which is not, in fact, a modern adapatation of Hair. One reviewer labels it "Vulgar pornographic musical not raunchy enough for 2011 tastes." I'd argue that this review is vulgar and offensive enough to make up for anything Let My People Come! is lacking. "...many cast members were not too sexy," writes Tom Williams. "If the aim was to have representatives from all size and weight and body types- this show hit the target." Yet despite all these ugly people, Williams still wishes there had been "more skin, more faux-sex acts and loads of nudity" which "would have spiced up the show. During  the ending numbers cast members only stripped to their designer underwear when full nudity would have brought the house down."

Questions? Tips? Email kdries@wbez.org.