Workplace Wednesdays: How to be prepared but still ready for anything

May 9, 2012

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Plan for the best, prepare for the worst. We've all heard it and probably had varying levels of success with its implementation. It's difficult not to go too negative and always assume that the worst will ensue, and it can be equally hard to not feel ready if problems actually arise. So just cover all the bases and overprepare, right? Not so fast, says Pamela Meyer. Meyer is an organizational consultant, working with companies and individuals to make work a better place. Last Wednesday, she joined Steve Edwards on Afternoon Shift to explain the advantages and disadvantages of a playful work environment.

On this edition of Workplace Wednesdays, Meyer explains why workers need to possess the skill of agility. Meyer defines agility as the space between panic and boredom. Picture this. Your boss turns to you and yells, "This report was wrong! I need a new version in 20 minutes...OR YOU'RE FIRED!" (Ok, that's extreme but stick with me). What happens? You freeze, start to sweat and feel paralyzed to make the next move. That's panic setting in. Meyer points to agility to set you straight. Now imagine the other extreme. You haven't seen your boss in weeks, let alone received direction from her. Your workload is comfortable but unchallenging, and your job is secure. You're bored. This isn't a good place to be either. Meyer says tapping that agile spirit you may ask for a promotion, seek out new tasks or maybe even poke the boss for a raise.

Allowing agility to guide your moves produces more than just tangible results, according to Meyer. She says that it all makes for a more engaged worker. We'll feel more in touch with our colleagues, our boss and our company. Meyer joins Edwards Wednesday to offer practical advice on how to seek this balance so you're ready for anything, but also ready to switch gears when your boss rips up your latest report.

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