The sight, sound and feel of analog recordings make up a new art exhibition

June 14, 2011

By Joe DeCeault

Download Story
(Flickr/Rik Ruff)
'Wow and Flutter' at Johalla Projects in Wicker Park captuers the sights and sounds of analogue recordings.
(WBEZ/Joe DeCeault)
Anna Marie Cerniglia and Caitlin Arnold, director and assitant director of Johalla Projects
(WBEZ/Joe DeCeault)
Artist Ron Ewert's "Colored Polygons in the Oven"
(WBEZ/Joe DeCeault)
Artist Brett Naucke's "Brief Retrospective of Catholic Tapes"
(WBEZ/Joe DeCeault)
Artist Bryan Lear's "Mix/Tape"
(WBEZ/Joe DeCeault)
Triangle Incorporated art collective's "Detaroprocni Elgnairt"
(WBEZ/Joe DeCeault)
Johalla Projects' Caitlin Arnold and Anna Marie Cerniglia experience artist Chris Fischer's "Moss Man" sound and visual art
(WBEZ/Joe DeCeault)
The story behind the making of Chris Fisher's artwork

In this ever-increasing digital age, there are those who long for a simpler time, or at least a more tactile one. Case in point: a new art exhibition deeply attached to the sight and sound of analog recordings. Eight Forty-Eight’s Joe DeCeault has all the details.

The exhibition Wow and Flutter: Dynamic Range in Analog Art runs through June 21 at Johalla Projects in Wicker Park. They’ll have a second showing this Thursday, but appointments are required.

Categories