Key player in India's Anna Hazare movement hopeful that anti-corruption bill will pass

October 24, 2011

Download Story
(AP/Kevin Frayer)
Prashant Bhushan, left, speaks to Anna Hazare, center, India's leading anti-corruption activisti.

Before the Occupy Wall Street movement swept American and European cities, thousands of Indians from all walks of life joined protests against government corruption. The protesters marched in support of activist Anna Hazare, who went on hunger strike in April to push for a more comprehensive version of an anti-corruption bill making its way through parliament.

The legislation, dubbed Lokpal, would create an ombudsman with the power to investigate public officials accused of graft and bribery. India’s parliament is set to vote on it this winter.

Indian lawyer Prashant Bhushan is a key player in this movement. He's spent more than 20 years fighting corrupt politicians and companies in his country. Earlier this year he joined “Team Anna,” a coalition of activists, including Hazare, that has made recommendations for improving Lokpal.

Prashant stopped by our studios while he was in Chicago last week. He and Jerome talked about the momentum of the anti-corruption movement.  They also discussed a recent, much-publicized incident in which Bhushan was attacked in his Supreme Court chambers after making comments about Kashmir that angered Indian nationalists.