Ideas WBEZ Program Schedule

**Ideas airs on WBEZ Monday through Thursday nights at 11pm and Friday nights at midnight**
Due to rights restrictions, you can find audio only at the Ideas website http://www.cbc.ca/ideas/
 

THIS WEEK ON WBEZ:

Monday April 14
THE SCIENCE OF SHAKESPEARE
William Shakespeare was born 450 years ago this month, into a period when new ideas about the human body, the earth and the universe were threatening the old medieval worldview. Journalist and author Dan Falk examines the science of the Bard of Avon.
 
Tuesday, April 15
WACHTEL ON THE ARTS - Stan Douglas
Stan Douglas is both a cutting-edge contemporary art star, and a neighbourhood historian of his home city.  From his downtown Vancouver studio, he makes new works of photography and video that look like something out of the city archive. Eleanor Wachtel talks to Stan Douglas about his work, and his latest project Helen Lawrence, a theatre piece, created in collaboration with television writer Chris Haddock.
 
Wednesday, April 16
PREEMPTED BY AMERICA ABROAD
 
Thursday April 17
FRAGILE FREEDOMS - Vandana Shiva 
Physicist Vandana Shiva has become one of the world's leading environmental thinkers. In a lecture presented at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, she explores how "earth rights" are human rights. From the lecture series Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle for Human Rights.
 
Friday, April 18
THE WITNESS TREES 
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's epic poem Evangeline begins with the words "This is the forest primeval". Longfellow was talking about the rich Acadian forest, and was taking a little poetic license. In fact, settlers and boat-builders had already pillaged those forests. They were later altered again and again as the pulp and paper industry flourished. Some wonder whether those forests of 500 years ago can be regrown. Are our forests fiber mines or recreational playgrounds? Are they an economic engine or necessary for our environmental health? And are they essential, as some neuroscientific research is suggesting, to our mental well being? IDEAS contributor Dick Miller re-imagines the forest of the future.
 
 
 

LAST WEEK ON WBEZ:

Monday, April 7 
THE ENRIGHT FILES - Drink
We live in a culture that's awash in drink - enjoying, romanticizing and marketing the pleasures of alcohol. But countless millions of people have lost their families, their health and their dignity to alcohol. Michael Enright talks to two authors who have written about the bottle and the damage done: Ann Dowsett Johnston, author of Drink: The Intimate Relationship Between Women and Alcohol, and Olivia Laing, author of The Trip to Echo Spring: Why Writers Drink.
 
Tuesday, April 8 
MOBY DOLL
Thanks to Herman Melville's Moby Dick, many thought that the only good whale was a dead whale. But in 1964, the curator of the Vancouver Aquarium decided to kill a whale and study it to learn more about this supposedly monstrous creature. A whale was harpooned off Saturna Island on British Columbia's west coast. But it didn't die. That's how the tale of Moby Doll began, the whale that changed the world, according to IDEAS contributor Mark Leiren-Young.
 
Wednesday, April 9
RWANDA RECONCILIATION
The Rwandan genocide occurred 20 years ago this month. The consequences of the brutality and bloodshed are still alive today. Musician Jean-Paul Samputu tells his story of heartbreaking loss and breathtaking reconciliation with the man who killed his family. And experts try to answer what we've learned since: can we prevent genocide before it happens?
 
Thursday, April 10
UNFINISHED BUSINESS
On the tenth anniversary of the first free elections in South Africa in 2004, IDEAS broadcast a documentary series about the toll its dreadful past has had on the national psyche. Part of that toll is the legacy of oppression, and the reconciliation necessary from so much violence and evil. As a companion piece to our program about reconciliation in Rwanda, we're rebroadcasting an episode from Philip Coulter's series The Long Walk to Freedom.  It's the story of a massacre, and one woman's act of grace. 
 
Friday, April 11
THE NEXT BIG THING HAS ALREADY ARRIVED
For years, people proclaimed that the Internet was going to completely transform media. In 2013, it actually happened. New York Times media columnist David Carr delivers the 2013 Dalton Camp Lecture in Journalism at St. Thomas University in Fredericton. He argues that the campfires built by traditional media companies are dying and new methods of content creation and distribution are taking hold.