Chicago activist wins Goldman Environmental Prize

April 15, 2013

The Associated Press

AP/File
File: Midwest Generation's Crawford plant in Chicago. Kimberly Wasserman will receive the Goldman Environmental Prize for her work to shut down Crawford and Fisk, the city's last coal-fired power plants.

A Chicago woman who worked to shut down the city's last coal-fired power plants has won a coveted environmental honor.

Kimberly Wasserman will receive the $150,000 Goldman Environmental Prize for North America on Monday at a ceremony in San Francisco. The prize is given annually to six people — one on each of the inhabited continents.

The 36-year-old Wasserman is executive director of the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization. She helped form a coalition of activists that worked for more than a decade to help close the Crawford coal-fired plant in her neighborhood and the Fisk power plant in the Pilsen neighborhood.

Midwest Generation closed both plants seven months ago under pressure from the city and because of unfavorable market conditions.