Global Activism: Photojournalist Paola Gianturco reveals "Grandmother Power"

November 29, 2012

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Paola Gianturco
Indian grandmothers learn solar engineering and bring light to their dark villages, then teach other grandmothers from developing countries to do the same.
Paola Gianturco
Senegalese grandmothers guide villagers to identify good cultural traditions (dance, stories and values) and eliminate the bad (female genital mutilation, child marriage, teen pregnancy).
Paola Gianturco
Grandmother in Senegal instructing.
Paola Gianturco
In Argentina, grandmothers of infants and toddlers who were abducted during Argentina’s military dictatorship have located 105 grandchildren.
Paola Gianturco
In Guatemala, grandmothers operate a child abuse hotline and teach good parenting practices in a region where family violence occurs often.
Paola Gianturco
Canadian grandmothers create and sell crafts to benefit grandmothers in 15 African countries who are raising children orphaned by AIDS.
Paola Gianturco
In Swaziland, rural grandmothers farm together, earning money and growing food for their grandchildren orphaned by AIDS.

On today's Global Activism segment, photojournalist Paola Gianturco discusses the new, international activist grandmother movement she documents in her photographic book, Grandmother Power: A Global Phenomenon. The book reveals the lives of 120 activist grandmothers in 15 countries on five continents who effectively fight against poverty, disease, illiteracy, environmental degradation and human rights abuse.

Gianturco is a grandmother herself and was inspired to document what others are doing. She says from India to Camobodia to Argentina, grandmas are fighting for political, economic and social change. Among the numerous venues and organizations that have exhibited her work are the United Nations, UNESCO, the U.S. Senate, the Field Museum and the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.