WBEZ | society http://www.wbez.org/tags/society Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Afternoon Shift: What is the artist’s responsibility to address social issues? http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-07/afternoon-shift-what-artist%E2%80%99s-responsibility-address-social <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Flickr%20Todd%20Ehlers.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="(Photo: Flickr/Todd Ehlers)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204423139&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">The relationship between art and social commentary</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-3061-51d7-1519-215ac7f67acb">Theater has a history of making political and social statements. From Shakespeare, to Tennessee Williams and August Wilson, playwrights have used the stage to address issues of public importance. Now, with events in Ferguson, New York and most recently Baltimore - many local theaters are reacting by creating opportunities for audiences to explore issues of race and inequality. </span>Isaac Gomez, Bobby Bierdrzycki, John Conroy and, Anthony Moseley are all involved in the arts and have personal experience crafting social commentary into theater. We bring you this conversation in two parts.<br /><br /><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-3061-51d7-1519-215ac7f67acb"><a href="https://twitter.com/isoteric8">Isaac Gomez</a></span> is literary manager for the Victory Gardens Theater.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-3061-51d7-1519-215ac7f67acb"><a href="https://twitter.com/bobbyfloats">Bobby Bierdrzycki</a></span> is the curriculum and instruction associate for the Goodman Theatre.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-3061-51d7-1519-215ac7f67acb"><a href="http://www.john-conroy.com/">John Conroy</a></span> is a former investigative journalist and playwright.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-3061-51d7-1519-215ac7f67acb">Anthony Moseley is </span>Executive Artistic Director at <a href="https://twitter.com/Collaboraction">Collaboraction Theater</a>.</em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204423141&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Want to know where to find art in Chicago?</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-3063-77e0-41e0-5f4e7759a3c3">A few weeks ago we talked to the </span>General Admission guys about why people DON&rsquo;T see art. We invited our listeners to join in with their own reasons for not seeing artistic events, and many of you said part of it was you just didn&rsquo;t know about them. So we had our General Admission podcasters do some research to bring you some great resources for finding art in the city.</p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><a href="https://storify.com/WBEZ/afternoon-shift-how-do-you-find-out-about-artistic">You can check out some of the resources we listed, by going to the Storify page linked in this sentence.</a></p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-3063-77e0-41e0-5f4e7759a3c3">Guests:</span></strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-3063-77e0-41e0-5f4e7759a3c3"><a href="https://twitter.com/storyproducer">Tyler Greene</a></span> is co-host of WBEZ&rsquo;s General Admission podcast.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-3063-77e0-41e0-5f4e7759a3c3"><a href="https://twitter.com/thejoypowers">Joy Powers</a></span> is a WBEZ producer.</em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204423550&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Chicago business with a focus on fair trade apparel</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">On April 29 - &nbsp;to very little fanfare - the Cook County Board passed an ordinance which ensures that no county offices would purchase uniforms or other items from garment vendors that employ sweatshop labor. And, in the Chicago, May 7 is the second day of World Fair Trade Day Festival celebrations. Harish Patel is the owner of Chicago-based, ishi vest - a company that specializes in organic and fair trade clothing. He joins us for this installment in our week long series of conversations with local small business owners in honor of Small Business Week.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-3066-d555-fa29-a7b107b8e0f8">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/harishibrahim">Harish Patel</a> is owner of ishi vest.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/203497427&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Englewood residents negotiate the role Whole Foods will play in the community</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">It&rsquo;s going to be more than a year before Whole Foods opens a new store in Chicago&rsquo;s Englewood neighborhood. The company announced it&rsquo;s plans for Englewood a year-and-a-half ago. The lengthy timeline doesn&rsquo;t mean the community is sitting idly by. Residents are actively engaging with Whole Foods about the role of an organic grocery store in a food desert. WBEZ&rsquo;s Natalie Moore gives us an update.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-3068-a3a7-ff69-54f156abd289">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Natalie Moore</a> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204422239&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Has summertime finally arrived in Chicago?</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">It feels like the short but beautiful Chicago summer has finally arrived--but we all know it could feel like winter again in an instant. Joining us to explain this crazy late-spring weather is Gilbert Sebenste, meteorologist at Northern Illinois University.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-306a-3a2c-5ea6-12e0e4764a54">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/Gilbert_S">Gilbert Sebentse</a> is a meteorologist at Northern Illinois University.&nbsp;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204422796&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Tech Shift: What thunder looks like</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Lightning storms look cool - a brilliant flash of light in the dark, a massive bolt suddenly streaks across the sky. For the most part, we understand lightning. But what about thunder? Scientists from Southwest Research Institute have been conducting experiments to literally get a better picture of how thunder works. Dr. Maher Dayeh is a Space Physicist in the Space Science &amp; Engineering Division at Southwest Research Institute and he joins us with details on the team&rsquo;s experiment.</p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-306b-8b7e-8edc-c6492a50abb2"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Maher Dayeh is a space physicist in the Space Science &amp; Engineering Division at </em></span><em><a href="http://www.swri.org/">Southwest Research Institute</a>.&nbsp;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204422415&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Chicago&#39;s Jimmy Butler wins Most Improved Player</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The NBA has announced that the Bulls&rsquo; Jimmy Butler has been voted the league&#39;s Most Improved Player. Not only did Butler win that accolade but it was a landslide! WBEZ sports contributor and Bulls aficionado Cheryl Raye-Stout joins us from the Bulls practice at the Advocate Center.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-306e-b758-5378-d4297076942c">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/Crayestout">Cheryl Raye-Stout</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s sports contributor.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204249224&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Curious City: What does the Lincoln Park Zoo do with all of its poo?</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">In this excerpt from our <em>Fecal Matters!</em> live event, experts explain how studying poo can keep zoo animals happy and healthy.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204422619&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Cook County chiefs discuss criminal justice issues</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The top officials from Cook County&rsquo;s criminal justice system convened on May 7 for a panel discussion. Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle, Sheriff Tom Dart, State&rsquo;s Attorney Anita Alvarez, and Chief Judge Timothy Evans all sat together politely. But they&rsquo;ve been known to butt heads and assign each other blame in the past. WBEZ&rsquo;s Patrick Smith was there and he joins us with a recap.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-c2af537d-3072-4564-2794-6fbb3f2f3d9a">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/pksmid">Patrick Smith</a> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></p></p> Thu, 07 May 2015 16:29:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-07/afternoon-shift-what-artist%E2%80%99s-responsibility-address-social Fashion and art are closer than you think http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013-07/fashion-and-art-are-closer-you-think-108000 <p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Manet-Lady-with-Fans_480.jpg" title="(Art Institute of Chicago)" /></p><p>Although Chicago is not a fashion capital, our museums have done an excellent job in making connections between fashion and social and cultural changes. The Chicago History Museum&rsquo;s Costume Council frequently puts on rich exhibitions that explore the ways changes in fashion mirror changes in society at large. The latest example of this comes from the Art Institute of Chicago.</p><p>In <a href="http://www.artic.edu/exhibitions/impressionism-fashion-and-modernity" target="_blank"><em>Impressionism, Fashion, and Modernity</em></a>, curators connect the rising social classes, fashions designed to please these new classes and work of some of the most impressive Impressionists. Despite the faults of the exhibition&rsquo;s layout (dark, depressing rooms and the inability to fully immerse in the construction of the actual designs), the exhibition brings up a larger point that is still relevant today: <strong>What does fashion say about who we are?</strong></p><p>Some of the most exciting works in the exhibition are the small steel and wood engravings. Called &ldquo;fashion plates,&rdquo; the engravings resemble fashion spreads in magazines. The images on the plates have a potent combination of idealism and realism that rings true. This could be your life!</p><p>Fashion plates were eventually replaced by fashion photography and yet little has changed in how we present fashion and even images as a whole. Fashion spreads are often the only consistent outlet for commercial publications to explore aesthetic and artistic ideas on a regular basis. This is why fashion photography still makes headlines. They can help spread existing stereotypes or negative portrayals of different people.&nbsp;</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Renoir-La-Loge_360.png" style="float: left;" title="(Art Institute of Chicago)" />Impressionistic painting was inspired by the fashion of the time and fashion was an urban phenomena synonymous with modernity. Fashion offered a playground for artists to play, eventually bringing paintings to life. In turn, the paintings gave the dresses a freedom of movement not previously seen.</p><p>The paintings also immortalized the clothing and trends. Why is this not the case in contemporary society?</p><p>Contemporary art of the Impressionist period reflected the ephemerality of daily life and focused on the permanence of beauty and art. This was a rapidly changing time in relation to the distribution of wealth and resources. As individuals&#39; means changed, so too did their art.</p><p>Does contemporary society have an issue with &ldquo;beauty&rdquo; and &ldquo;art?&rdquo; Probably not. This could be a result of changing markets.</p><p>Both art and fashion have been overrun by purchasing power and capitalist markets. However, fashion has seen this occur much more rapidly than the art market.</p><p>Great art and beauty are still created on a daily basis. But everyday life lacks the ephemeral quality it once had. We are more connected and intertwined than ever before. Nothing dies on the Internet. What does this mean? Well for one, it means that our actions, however small, can live on beyond our own lives. In terms of connecting fashion and art, perhaps this means that there is nothing to reflect on in the grand picture. There is nothing to capture before it is gone because all of it can live on with us and in us with greater permanence.</p><p>Regarding fashion, we often claim that something has &ldquo;come back,&rdquo; but perhaps in 2013, it never went away. This is what ultimately makes the <em>Impressionism, Fashion, and Modernity</em> exhibition so important. It is not just reflecting on what was. It also reflects on what can no longer be. We&rsquo;ve abandoned the newness of fashion and culture. Perhaps we can rectify this. Perhaps not. Fashion is still tied into our wants and desires. People still purchase clothing &ndash; luxurious clothing &ndash; to reflect where they are (or where they want to be). But as an art form, it&rsquo;s lost its relevance with the everyday consumer.</p><p><em><strong>Britt Julious</strong>&nbsp;blogs about culture in and outside of Chicago. Follow Britt&#39;s essays for&nbsp;<a href="http://wbez.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">WBEZ&#39;s Tumblr</a>&nbsp;or on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/britticisms" target="_blank">@britticisms</a>. She&#39;s a co-host of the&nbsp;<a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/wbezs-changing-channels/id669715774?mt=2" target="_blank">Changing Channels</a>&nbsp;podcast about the future of television.</em></p></p> Wed, 10 Jul 2013 12:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013-07/fashion-and-art-are-closer-you-think-108000 Nussbaum proposes a new way of assessing national well-being http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-30/nussbaum-proposes-new-way-assessing-national-well-being-91239 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//segment/photo/2011-August/2011-08-30/Nussbaum U of C.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><audio class="mejs mediaelement-formatter-identified-1332483678-1" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/sites/default/files/nussbaum.mp3">&nbsp;</audio></p><p>Deciding whether or not a country is advancing often comes down to a numbers game. Gross domestic product, or GDP, is the typical measure used to track&nbsp; a nation’s economic progress or failure. But many argue that measure falls short of the mark.</p><p>In her new book <a href="http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674050549" target="_blank"><em>Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach</em></a>, <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/nussbaum/" target="_blank">Martha Nussbaum</a> thinks we need to get back to basics when evaluating the overall health and well-being of a society.<br> <br> Earlier this year, <em>Eight Forty-Eight's </em>Alison Cuddy talked to the University of Chicago professor about the benefits of this approach.</p></p> Tue, 30 Aug 2011 14:55:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-30/nussbaum-proposes-new-way-assessing-national-well-being-91239 Nussbaum proposes a new way of assessing national well-being http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-05-04/nussbaum-proposes-new-way-assessing-national-well-being-86053 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//segment/photo/2011-May/2011-05-04/Nussbaum U of C.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Deciding whether or not a country is advancing often comes down to a numbers game. Gross domestic product, or GDP, is the typical measure by which we track a nation’s economic progress or failure. But many argue that measure falls short of the mark.<br> <br> In her new book <a href="http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674050549" target="_blank"><em>Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach</em></a>, <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/nussbaum/" target="_blank">Martha Nussbaum</a> thinks we need to get back to basics when evaluating the overall health and well-being of a society.<br> <br> Host Alison Cuddy recently talked to the University of Chicago professor about the benefits of this approach.</p></p> Wed, 04 May 2011 14:23:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-05-04/nussbaum-proposes-new-way-assessing-national-well-being-86053