WBEZ | Mars http://www.wbez.org/tags/mars Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Congress Wants NASA to Build a Space Habitat http://www.wbez.org/programs/marketplace/2015-12-31/congress-wants-nasa-build-space-habitat-114332 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/ISS-Derived_Deep_Space_Habitat.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res461421056" previewtitle="When former Gov. Jeb Bush announced his candidacy in June 2015, he was talked about as the likely front-runner for the GOP nomination."><div data-crop-type="">&nbsp;</div></div><div><div id="file-296235"><img alt="" src="http://www.marketplace.org/sites/default/files/styles/primary-image-766x447/public/ISS-Derived_Deep_Space_Habitat.jpg?itok=UeCn5cjA" style="height: 362px; width: 620px;" title="NASA's concept for a deep space habitat. (NASA/Creative Commons)" typeof="foaf:Image" /><div><div><div><p>Buried in the latest omnibus spending bill from Congress:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.popsci.com/congress-wants-nasa-to-get-working-on-deep-space-habitat" target="_blank">plans to build a deep-space habitat</a>.</p></div></div></div></div></div><div><div id="story-content"><div><div><div><p>One that might help NASA get a crew to Mars one day.</p><p>Congress set aside $55 million for the space-worthy living quarters. It wants an update from NASA by the middle of next year and is pushing to have something ready to go by 2018.</p><p>SpaceNews reports NASA could be testing the habitat in the 2020s and actually using it to get to Mars in the 2030s.</p><p>Which, as future-y as it sounds, isn&#39;t all that far away.&nbsp;</p></div></div></div></div></div><p>&mdash; <a href="http://www.marketplace.org/2015/12/29/life/final-note/final-note" target="_blank"><em>via Marketplace</em></a></p></p> Tue, 29 Dec 2015 11:37:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/marketplace/2015-12-31/congress-wants-nasa-build-space-habitat-114332 As Big Food Feels Threat Of Climate Change, Companies Speak Up http://www.wbez.org/news/big-food-feels-threat-climate-change-companies-speak-114009 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/cocoafarm_custom-8ad7ea87e6fe13bef7e255f0fb035292673a55e5-s700-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res457928348" previewtitle="Cocoa pods in Ivory Coast, one of the world's top producers of cocoa. Climate models suggest that West Africa, where much of the world's cocoa is grown, will get drier, which could affect supply."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Cocoa pods in Ivory Coast, one of the world's top producers of cocoa. Climate models suggest that West Africa, where much of the world's cocoa is grown, will get drier, which could affect supply." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/30/cocoafarm_custom-8ad7ea87e6fe13bef7e255f0fb035292673a55e5-s700-c85.jpg" style="height: 390px; width: 620px;" title="Cocoa pods in Ivory Coast, one of the world's top producers of cocoa. Climate models suggest that West Africa, where much of the world's cocoa is grown, will get drier, which could affect supply. (Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images)" /></div><div><div><p>Chances are, you&#39;ve picked up some chatter about the new global talks on climate change. If you can&#39;t quite see how it matters to you, personally, you might want to take a peek inside your pantry. Or your candy jar. Because it might just affect your access to everything from cheese to chocolate.</p></div></div></div><p>&quot;It&#39;s very clear now that a changing climate will have a profound effect on agriculture,&quot; says&nbsp;<a href="http://geog.umd.edu/facultyprofile/Brown/Molly">Molly Brown</a>, a geographer at the University of Maryland.</p><p>Take one simple example, she says: Vermont.</p><p>Farmers in this state used to count on being able to plant corn in May, she says. But weather patterns are shifting. The month of May is now typically cold and wet, &quot;so they&#39;re really not able to plant their corn until the middle of June. That delays its harvest. And then we might have an early frost.&quot;</p><div id="res457935424">The result is less corn for Vermont&#39;s cows, and less local milk for the state&#39;s dairies. &quot;It really changes the economic structure of how dairy products are produced in Vermont,&quot; Brown says.</div><p>This kind of thing is happening all over the world, sometimes with life-changing consequences.</p><p>In Ethiopia, Brown says, the country&#39;s traditional center of farming now isn&#39;t getting enough rain for its crops. Meanwhile, rain is falling in another region, in the northern part of Ethiopia, where few people live because it used to be really dry. &quot;So the question is, do people move up north? Can they simply move the way they farm to that new region?&quot;</p><p>Most farmers can&#39;t really see the big global patterns of climate change, and certainly can&#39;t change what&#39;s happening.</p><p>But big multinational companies can see it, because they buy shiploads of farm products from all over the world.</p><p>Take, for example,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mars.com/global/index.aspx">Mars Inc.</a>, maker of Mars bars, M&amp;M&#39;s, Snickers, Skittles and more.</p><p>&quot;[Climate change is] absolutely a threat,&quot; says&nbsp;<a href="http://www.chocovision.ch/speakers/barry-parkin">Barry Parkin</a>, the company&#39;s chief sustainability officer. &quot;And that&#39;s why we&#39;re doing all that we&#39;re doing today.&quot;</p><p>A key ingredient in the company&#39;s most tempting products, of course, is chocolate. This comes from cocoa trees, most of them in West Africa, where the climate is hot and humid. But Parkin says it may not stay that way. &quot;Most of the models will say that it&#39;s going to get drier in West Africa, and that&#39;s not good for cocoa,&quot; he says. And cocoa is just one of the 100 or so agricultural commodities that Mars needs for its food and pet food products.</p><p>Parkin is confident that his company will be able to get those ingredients somewhere. &quot;I&#39;m less worried about that,&quot; he says. &quot;We will find most of the crops we need to find. Maybe in different places. I&#39;m more concerned about the farmers,&quot; such as those who depend on the cocoa harvest.</p><p>According to Parkin, Mars is looking for ways to help those farmers get through this. The strategy, he says, is to help those farmers become more productive. Mars is providing better cocoa trees, fertilizer and training. It puts money in the farmers&#39; pockets, &quot;and that gives them a level of resiliency. No longer does one bad harvest cripple them,&quot; he says.</p><p>That&#39;s the part of the company&#39;s strategy that&#39;s aimed at getting ready for a changing climate, and adapting to it.</p><p>But because Mars is so aware that this is costly and painful, it&#39;s also trying to keep the situation from getting worse.</p><p>That starts with reducing the company&#39;s own greenhouse gas emissions. &quot;We set our first&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mars.com/global/about-mars/mars-pia/our-operations/energy-and-climate.aspx">goals</a>&nbsp;in 2009, for what we needed to do as a company to reduce our impact on the planet,&quot; Parkin says.</p><p>According to Parkin, Mars has cut its emissions of climate warming gases by 25 percent compared with eight years ago. It&#39;s planning to be carbon neutral &mdash; not contributing to the warming of the climate at all &mdash; by 2040.</p><p>And last month, Mars joined with nine other global food companies, including General Mills, Unilever and Nestle, who released a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ceres.org/press/press-releases/global-food-companies-unite-on-climate-action">letter</a>&nbsp;calling climate change a threat to the world&#39;s food supply. The food giants endorsed steps that would limit the planet&#39;s temperature increase to no more than 2 degrees Celsius. (Since then, the total number of companies who&#39;ve signed on has grown to 14.)</p><p>According to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ceres.org/about-us/who-we-are/ceres-staff/anne-kelly">Anne Kelly</a>, a senior program director at Ceres, the letter has drawn together a wide range of companies.</p><p>&quot;Some of these are major companies in Republican states, and they&#39;re standing up and saying we need a strong deal,&quot; Kelly says. &quot;This has never happened before.&quot;</p><p>She also points to the logo Ceres created for the letter, which shows fossil fuels underground and windmills on the surface.</p><p>Parkin of Mars says the food industry will be instrumental in fighting climate change. &quot;What those companies are doing is coming together to encourage governments, basically saying to government, &#39;We need you to make similar commitments,&#39; &quot; he says.</p><p>Mars will also have representatives at the global talks in Paris, lobbying for an agreement to put the brakes on a warming climate. It&#39;s an effort to protect their own supplies of raw materials &mdash; and the lives of small cocoa farmers in West Africa.</p><p>Jonathan Mudd, a spokesman for Mars, says the company plans to share its experience cutting carbon emissions in Paris, and try to &quot;drive for some meaningful change, a meaningful outcome to the conference.&quot;</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/12/01/456369536/as-big-food-feels-threat-of-climate-change-companies-speak-up?ft=nprml&amp;f=456369536" target="_blank"><em>via NPR</em></a></p></p> Tue, 01 Dec 2015 12:31:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/big-food-feels-threat-climate-change-companies-speak-114009 Researchers reveal how climate change killed Mars http://www.wbez.org/news/researchers-reveal-how-climate-change-killed-mars-113660 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Solar storms from the sun send charged particles streaming towards Mars. Research now shows those particles are stripping away the atmosphere..jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res454897100" previewtitle="Solar storms from the sun send charged particles streaming towards Mars. Research now shows those particles are stripping away the atmosphere."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Solar storms from the sun send charged particles streaming towards Mars. Research now shows those particles are stripping away the atmosphere." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/05/15-217-master_custom-ae3dc2332390a1086aec672f59f1ce257425665e-s500-c85.jpg" style="height: 348px; width: 620px;" title="Solar storms from the sun send charged particles streaming towards Mars. Research now shows those particles are stripping away the atmosphere. (NASA/GSFC)" /></div><div><div><p>Climate change isn&#39;t just something to worry about here on Earth. New research published today shows that Mars has undergone a dramatic climate shift in the past that has rendered much of the planet inhospitable to life.</p></div></div></div><p>About 3.8 billion years ago, Mars was a reasonably pleasant place. It had a thick atmosphere filled with carbon dioxide that kept it warm. Rivers trickled into lakes across its surface. Some researchers think there might even have been an ocean.</p><p>&quot;It seems to have been a much more clement climate, a climate more suitable to sustaining life at the surface,&quot; says Bruce Jakosky, a researcher at the University of Colorado, Boulder.</p><div id="res454888439" previewtitle="Left: An artist's conception of early, wet Mars. Right: Modern-day Mars is dry and cold."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Left: An artist's conception of early, wet Mars. Right: Modern-day Mars is dry and cold." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/05/marsdyp_custom-41895972a626c45b80a5428c8b0c7c4e5858bc77-s500-c85.jpg" style="height: 348px; width: 620px;" title="Left: An artist's conception of early, wet Mars. Right: Modern-day Mars is dry and cold. (NASA/GSFC; NASA/JPL/MSSS)" /></div><div><div><p>Nobody knows if there was life on Mars back then, but it&#39;s now a hostile place. The water&#39;s mostly gone. So is a lot of that cozy atmosphere. To try and find out what went wrong, Jakosky and other scientists have sent a spacecraft called the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission, or MAVEN.</p></div></div></div><p>With each swing around Mars, MAVEN actually dips into the planet&#39;s atmosphere, gathering data. The results are published today in two journals &mdash;&nbsp;<a href="http://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/agu/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1944-8007/">Geophysical Research Letters</a>&nbsp;and<a href="http://www.sciencemag.org/content/350/6261/643.full">Science</a>&nbsp;&mdash; and they reveal something remarkable: Mars&#39; atmosphere is actually leaking into space.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s leaving at a rate about 100 grams per second,&quot; Jaksosky says. &quot;That doesn&#39;t seem like much, but you add it up over a couple of billion years and it&#39;s enough to remove the entire atmosphere.&quot;</p><p>The cause is our friendly neighborhood star, the sun. It&#39;s constantly shooting out high energy particles known collectively as the solar wind.</p><p>&quot;[The wind] streams outward at a gas flow at about a million miles per hour,&quot; Jaksosky says.</p><p>On Earth, our magnetic field blocks the solar wind. Particles become tangled in it before they can ever reach our precious air supply.</p><p>There is no magnetic field on Mars, so when the solar wind reaches the Red Planet, the atmosphere gets stripped away.</p><div id="res454908306"><div><div><div id="slideshow454908306"><a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/11/05/454594559/researchers-reveal-how-climate-change-killed-mars?ft=nprml&amp;f=454594559" target="_blank"><em><strong>Watch how</strong></em></a></div></div></div></div><p>This wasn&#39;t always the case. When Mars was warm and wet, it appears to have had a magnetic field, too. But that field ran out. Scientists think that&#39;s when the atmosphere and water began to bleed into space.</p><p>&quot;It would have taken a couple of hundred million years,&quot; Jaksoky says.</p><p>&quot;I think we are onto something new here with the MAVEN results,&quot; says Mike Liemohn, a planetary scientist at the University of Michigan.</p><p>Liemohn says there are still plenty of questions about what else happened to Mars atmosphere. Did a comet or asteroid impact blow part of it away? Did rocks on the surface suck vital gases? And perhaps most important of all: What happened to Mars&#39;s magnetic field?</p><p>MAVEN continues to orbit, looking for answers.</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/11/05/454594559/researchers-reveal-how-climate-change-killed-mars?ft=nprml&amp;f=454594559" target="_blank"><em> via NPR</em></a></p></p> Thu, 05 Nov 2015 15:20:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/researchers-reveal-how-climate-change-killed-mars-113660 Morning Shift: September 29, 2015 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-29/morning-shift-september-29-2015-113106 <p><p>Do you have what it takes to go to Mars &mdash; cramped in a small rocket with others for the estimated six months it would take to get there? Now that water has been discovered on the Red Planet, scientists are even more eager to send humans on a Mars Mission. Hopefully it won&rsquo;t be like the journey described in the new movie Matt Damon movie &ldquo;The Martian.&rdquo; We examine what a <a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-29/putting-together-team-travel-mars-113105">perfect Mars Mission Team</a> would look like and what NASA might learn from the world of psychology when it comes to how relationships form and fracture in tight spaces.</p><p>And back here on earth, the battle over the expansion of <a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-29/charter-schools-looking-expand-113104">Charter Schools </a>in Chicago continues. Seven charters want to open up new campuses across the city and, not surprisingly, that&rsquo;s being met with opposition. WBEZ Education Reporter Linda Lutton breaks down the arguments from both sides.</p><p>We also talk about diversity on TV on the <a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-29/trevor-noah-takes-over-host-daily-show-113101">Daily Show with Trevor Noah</a> and ABC&#39;s <a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-29/bollywood-mega-star-crosses-over-american-television-113103">Quantico</a>.</p></p> Tue, 29 Sep 2015 12:25:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-29/morning-shift-september-29-2015-113106 Putting together a team to travel to Mars http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-29/putting-together-team-travel-mars-113105 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/mars water NASA.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A couple of days before the release of a film about a voyage to Mars, NASA announces it&rsquo;s discovered <a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/09/28/444160913/scientists-confirm-theres-water-in-the-dark-streaks-on-mars">water on the Red Planet</a>. Whether it was a deliberate marketing ploy by NASA or not, the water news has more folks wondering about life on Mars and scientists chomping at the bit to get a manned mission there.</p><p>But with such a long journey in an isolated environment, who would be best suited to embark on the trip with other astronauts and not get on each other&#39;s nerves? We&#39;re joined by <a href="https://twitter.com/teamslab">Suzanne Bell</a>, an Associate Professor of industrial and Organizational Psychology who&rsquo;s working on a NASA-funded research on team composition.</p></p> Tue, 29 Sep 2015 12:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-29/putting-together-team-travel-mars-113105 Scientists confirm there's water in the dark streaks on Mars http://www.wbez.org/news/scientists-confirm-theres-water-dark-streaks-mars-113080 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/MARS.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res444165530" previewtitle="For several years, a satellite orbiting Mars has seen streaks flowing from Martian mountains during warm periods on the surface. Scientists have now confirmed that water is involved."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="For several years, a satellite orbiting Mars has seen streaks flowing from Martian mountains during warm periods on the surface. Scientists have now confirmed that water is involved." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/09/28/esp_040170_1440-ed6eb60e9e09208555e68c9ab6748af3829a035b-s700-c85.jpg" style="height: 449px; width: 600px;" title="For several years, a satellite orbiting Mars has seen streaks flowing from Martian mountains during warm periods on the surface. Scientists have now confirmed that water is involved. (NASA/JPL/University of Arizona)" /></div><div><p>Scientists have caught Mars crying salty tears.</p></div></div><p>Photos from NASA&#39;s&nbsp;<a href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mro/">Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter</a>&nbsp;show dark streaks flowing down Martian slopes. The streaks appear in sunny spots or when the weather is warm, and they fade when the temperature drops.</p><p>Water was suspected to be involved, but now scientists have confirmed its presence. The new analysis,&nbsp;<a href="http://nature.com/articles/doi:10.1038/ngeo2546">published in Nature Geoscience</a>, shows salts mixed with water when the streaks are darkest. The water disappears when the streaks lighten.</p><div id="res444166425" previewtitle="Streaks a few hundred feet in length appear on the walls of Garni crater on Mars. Scientists suspect they are formed by the flow of briny, liquid water on Mars."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Streaks a few hundred feet in length appear on the walls of Garni crater on Mars. Scientists suspect they are formed by the flow of briny, liquid water on Mars." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/09/28/perspective_6_wide-a6e7e8285cd80b68bca8050577a6396f3315b5ce-s700-c85.jpg" style="height: 337px; width: 600px;" title="Streaks a few hundred feet in length appear on the walls of Garni crater on Mars. Scientists suspect they are formed by the flow of briny, liquid water on Mars. (NASA/JPL/University of Arizona)" /></div><div><p>&quot;It&#39;s only when these streaks are biggest and widest that we see evidence for molecular water,&quot; says&nbsp;<a href="http://www.lujendraojha.net/">Lujendra Ojha</a>, a graduate student at the Georgia Institute of Technology.</p></div></div><p>Ojha cautions this isn&#39;t the same as streams trickling downhill on Earth. Standing on the streaks would be like standing on a hot beach on Earth and dribbling a little water out of a drinking bottle. &quot;You would just see a hint of wetness,&quot; he says.</p><div id="res444167777" previewtitle="The lines appear on slopes with exposure to sunlight. Researchers now believe that the warm sun may cause water to begin flowing."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="The lines appear on slopes with exposure to sunlight. Researchers now believe that the warm sun may cause water to begin flowing." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/09/28/esp_030373_1755-4208a4d7882165185e589d3cd0e50e2e4059496e-s700-c85.jpg" style="height: 450px; width: 600px;" title="The lines appear on slopes with exposure to sunlight. Researchers now believe that the warm sun may cause water to begin flowing. (NASA/JPL/University of Arizona)" /></div><div><p>Ojha says the water could be <a href="http://www.uahirise.org/ESP_030373_1755" target="_blank">important for future exploration </a>of Mars. It might be that astronauts could one day use it for everything from drinking water to rocket fuel, but that depends on how much there is.</p></div></div><p>The water could be coming from a subsurface reservoir, but that&#39;s not the only option, Ojha says. Ice, or even moisture in the atmosphere, could also be causing the streaks.</p><p>&quot;We&#39;re not entirely sure what the source of the water may be,&quot; he says.</p><p>&mdash; <em><a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/09/28/444160913/scientists-confirm-theres-water-in-the-dark-streaks-on-mars?ft=nprml&amp;f=444160913" target="_blank">via NPR&#39;s The Two-Way</a></em></p></p> Mon, 28 Sep 2015 10:23:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/scientists-confirm-theres-water-dark-streaks-mars-113080 Morning Shift: The effect of homicide clearances on community http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-03-23/morning-shift-effect-homicide-clearances-community-111749 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/mikecogh.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="Flickr/mikecogh" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/197296364&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Gov. Rauner&rsquo;s rhetoric raises questions on immigration</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">We discuss Gov. Bruce Rauner&#39;s stance on immigration in Illinois. Lawrence Benito, the CEO/Executive Director of the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights weighs in.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/llbenito">Lawrence Benito</a>&nbsp;is&nbsp;the CEO/Executive Director of the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>&nbsp;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/197296361&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Filmmakers and public meet to discuss future of indie films on PBS</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Last November, New York public television station WNET announced they&rsquo;d be moving the program&#39;s Independent Lens and POV to their less-watched sister station on Long Island. Indie filmmakers and members of the public soon began voicing their concern that the diversity of both the stories and the filmmakers featured on these programs, and the important content they contained, were being pushed aside by both WNET and PBS. In response, execs from the station and the network, along with producers from both shows, created a national listening tour to allay fears and talk about the future of independent film on PBS. The&nbsp;<a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pbs-listening-tour-chicago-registration-15979967513">final meeting</a> is Monday in Chicago. Kartemquin Films is playing a big role in the meeting, and Gordon Quinn joins us to talk about what he wants to say, and what he wants to hear.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="http://www.kartemquin.com/about/history">Gordon Quinn</a> is the Founder and Artistic Director of <a href="https://twitter.com/Kartemquin">Kartemquin Films.</a>&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/197296354&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Life on Mars</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">It takes Mars almost twice as long as Earth to travel around the sun, which means the Martian year is much longer. Days on the red planet are roughly forty minutes longer than a day here. If we eventually travel there, how will humans have to adapt to cope with the Martian calendar? How will life be different on Mars? Shane Larson, astronomer at the Adler Planetarium, joins us to discuss what life would actually be like on Mars.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/sciencejedi">Shane Larson</a> is an astronomer at the Adler Planetarium.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/197296351&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">The effect of homicide clearances on community</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">As Mayor Rahm Emanuel runs for reelection, he&rsquo;s pointing to a slight decline in homicides during his term. He says he&rsquo;s promising to give parents in high-crime neighborhoods a greater sense of security. But a WBEZ investigation raises questions about how much the mayor&rsquo;s willing to do to put killers behind bars. We discuss how police clearing homicide cases can impact communities and what the Chicago might be able to learn from other departments around the country with Dr. David L. Carter, a former Kansas City Police Officer and now professor in the School of Criminal Justice and Director of the Intelligence Program at Michigan State University.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em>&nbsp;<a href="http://cj.msu.edu/people/carter-david/">Dr. David L. Carter</a> is a professor and Director of the Intelligence Program at <a href="https://twitter.com/michiganstateu">Michigan State University.</a></em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/197296345&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Dance -&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">The Seldoms perform &lsquo;Power Goes&rsquo;</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Body language says a lot; an erect&nbsp; posture indicates confidence while hunched shoulders may give away one&rsquo;s lack of self esteem. One man who used his body language to display his power over others was President Lyndon Johnson. He is the inspiration for the latest dance piece called &ldquo;Power Goes&rdquo; by Chicago&rsquo;s The Seldoms to explore power and its effects on us. The Seldoms Artistic Director and the writer of the show join us on the Morning Shift to talk about the broader themes behind the story.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em>&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/carriehanson">Carrie Hanson</a> is the Artistic Director for <a href="https://twitter.com/The_Seldoms">The Seldoms.</a></em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="http://www.chicagodramatists.org/Sys/PublicProfile/8101187/958233">Stuart Flack</a> is a a playwright and wrtier of <a href="http://www2.mcachicago.org/event/the-seldoms-power-goes/">&quot;Power Goes.&quot;</a></em></p></p> Mon, 23 Mar 2015 07:44:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-03-23/morning-shift-effect-homicide-clearances-community-111749 Chicago has a 'Project Batman' and it's hiring http://www.wbez.org/blogs/charlie-meyerson/2013-02/chicago-has-project-batman-and-its-hiring-105799 <p><p><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wMpHZs0F7k&amp;feature=youtu.be&amp;t=5m5s" target="_blank"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Screen%20shot%202013-02-27%20at%201.24.24%20PM.png" style="float: right; height: 182px; width: 300px;" title="City of Chicago Director of Analytics Tom Schenk Jr." /></a></p><p><strong>YEAH, CHICAGO HAS A &#39;PROJECT BATMAN.&#39;</strong>&nbsp;Chicago&#39;s analytics director, <strong>Tom Schenk Jr. </strong>&mdash; who kinda looks like Bruce Wayne, doesn&#39;t he? &mdash; tells a gathering of journalists, programmers and government leaders&nbsp;<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wMpHZs0F7k&amp;feature=youtu.be&amp;t=5m5s" target="_blank">the city&#39;s working with the University of Illinois at Chicago to visualize crime data</a>&nbsp;in a 3-D&nbsp;<a href="http://techland.time.com/2013/02/25/cave2-not-a-star-trek-holodeck-yet-but-getting-closer/" target="_blank">virtual reality &quot;cave.&quot;</a><br />* P.S.&nbsp;<a href="https://chicago.taleo.net/careersection/100/joblist.ftl" target="_blank">They&#39;re hiring</a>. (The &quot;Project Manager - DoIT&quot; job.)</p><p><strong>&#39;THE NRA WANTS TO KEEP GUN RECORDS SECRET FROM EVERYONE EXCEPT THE NRA.&#39; </strong>You know&nbsp;those public gun ownership records that have brought shame and <a href="http://jimromenesko.com/2013/02/26/editor-who-made-request-resigns/" target="_blank">death threats</a>&nbsp;to journalists who&#39;ve dared even just to express interest in them? The records the National Rifle Association contends shouldn&#39;t be public because they put gun owners &quot;at risk to criminals who may target their home to steal firearms&quot;? Funny thing: Gun-rights groups, including the NRA, have for years been <a href="http://gawker.com/5987293/the-nra-wants-to-keep-gun-records-secret-from-everyone-except-the-nra">diving into those records for fundraising and recruiting efforts</a>, according to&nbsp;<em>Gawker</em>.<br />* For NYC&#39;s Bloomberg, election that nominated Robin Kelly for Congress was mainly about testing&nbsp;<a href="http://www.buzzfeed.com/cjlotz/bloombergs-pac-reveals-strategy-for-making-a-chicago-area-ra" target="_blank">political strategy to defang the NRA</a>.<br />* ... And for Republicans in that race? Guy who did almost <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/ct-met-2nd-district-republican-nominee-20130228,0,3550456.story" target="_blank">20 years for burglaries, armed robberies and aggravated battery</a>.<br />* <em>Chicago Magazine</em>&#39;s Carol Felsenthal: &quot;<a href="http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/Felsenthal-Files/February-2013/Billionaire-Mayor-Bloomberg-Buys-Illinois-2nd-District-Congressional-Seat/" target="_blank">Bloomberg could be a key funder of a Rahm run for the presidency</a>.&quot;<br />* &quot;Gun rights&quot; Democrats may <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2013/02/27/liberals-to-dems-no-more-cozying-up-to-the-nra/" target="_blank">pay a price for coziness with NRA</a>.<br />* Downstate Republican Illinois representative compares gun control to emasculation: &quot;<a href="http://www.rrstar.com/blogs/kevinhaas/x711925952/Rep-Jim-Sacia-compares-gun-control-to-castration" target="_blank">You folks in Chicago want me to get castrated because your families are having too many kids</a>.&quot;</p><hr /><p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:20px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, serif;"><span style="color:#a52a2a;"><em>Friday: The next WBEZ Meyerson News Quiz.&nbsp;</em></span><a href="http://www.wbez.org/tags/news-quiz" target="_blank"><span style="color:#a52a2a;">Take last week&#39;s now</span></a><span style="color:#a52a2a;">.</span></span></span></p><hr /><p><strong>SHOULD NPR SWEAR OFF GOVERNMENT CASH? </strong>National Public Radio&#39;s former CEO says <a href="http://www.newsmax.com/US/Ken-Stern-NPR-funding/2013/02/27/id/492286" target="_blank">walking away from federal cash</a> would lay to rest questions about the organization&#39;s credibility. He says public radio &quot;would do better&quot; without public financing.<br />* <a href="http://www.npr.org/2013/02/27/173056290/5-4-3-2-1-we-have-sequestration" target="_blank">Countdown to sequestration</a> just latest of many.</p><p><strong><a href="http://www.theverge.com/2013/2/27/4038280/star-trek-tng-in-theatres-best-of-both-worlds-april-25" target="_blank"><img alt="&quot;Star Trek&quot;: &quot;The Best of Both Worlds&quot;" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-DqQygKOCVUs/TlkNyU0uBCI/AAAAAAAAADQ/DRYhmMEP8Uw/s1600/The+Best+of+Both+Worlds.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 229px; float: right;" /></a>RESISTANCE IS FUTILE.&nbsp;</strong>What some fans consider the best two &quot;Star Trek&quot; episodes ever -- &quot;The Best of Both Worlds&quot; (a.ka. <strong>Capt. Picard goes Borg</strong>) -- <a href="http://www.theverge.com/2013/2/27/4038280/star-trek-tng-in-theatres-best-of-both-worlds-april-25" target="_blank">will be shown, newly remastered for Blu-ray, as a single movie on the big screen</a>, one night only, April 25.<br />* <a href="http://www.fathomevents.com/?utm_source=Star_Trek_TNG3_Press_Release&amp;utm_medium=PR&amp;utm_campaign=Star_Trek_TNG3_Fathom_Event_Page#!star-trek-best-of-both-worlds/more-info/theaters" target="_blank">22 Illinois theaters</a> on list of those screening the episodes.</p><p><b>UNRELATED DEVELOPMENTS.</b><br />* The departing <a href="http://www.newser.com/story/163589/popes-living-arrangements-are-a-little-er-weird.html" target="_blank">Pope Benedict&#39;s future living arrangements</a> are&nbsp;raising eyebrows&nbsp;around the world.<br />* Nonprofit foundation seeking couple for&nbsp;<a href="http://www.aljazeera.com/news/americas/2013/02/201322723556589753.html" target="_blank">501-day roundtrip mission to Mars</a>.</p><hr /><p><em><strong>ANNOUNCEMENTS.</strong></em><br /><em>* Suggestions for this blog?&nbsp;<a href="mailto:cmeyerson@wbez.org?subject=Things%20and%20stuff">Email anytime</a>.<br />* Get this blog by email, free. <a href="http://feedburner.google.com/fb/a/mailverify?uri=feedburner/AELk&amp;amp;loc=en_US" target="_blank">Sign up here</a>.</em><br /><em>* Follow us on Twitter:&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/wbez" target="_blank">@WBEZ</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/meyerson" target="_blank">@Meyerson</a>.</em></p></p> Thu, 28 Feb 2013 05:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/charlie-meyerson/2013-02/chicago-has-project-batman-and-its-hiring-105799 New insight into the origins of Mars http://www.wbez.org/blog/clever-apes/2011-05-25/new-insight-origins-mars-87040 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//blog/photo/2011-May/2011-05-25/Inner planets.jpg" alt="" /><p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="From left to right, the relative sizes of Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars. " class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2011-May/2011-05-25/Inner planets.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 261px;" title="From left to right, the relative sizes of Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars. "></p><p>Scientists have delivered us another origin story today: about the formation of the planet Mars. New research from a Chicago scientist suggests the red planet developed in just a fraction of the time it took Earth, and effectively had its growth stunted.</p><p>Nicolas Dauphas says Mars is actually a planet embryo, in a state of arrested development. The University of Chicago professor says planets like Earth and Venus formed as several embryos collided and fused. Mars, though, grew rapidly from one original hunk of material.</p><p>“We think it took approximately 50 million years to grow a planet like Earth,” said Dapuhas. “And the result of our study shows that Mars grew in only two million years.”</p><p>The explanation might account for Mars’ small size – about one-tenth the mass of Earth.</p><p>Dauphas studied Martian meteorites and, by testing for certain isotopes, was able to essentially date when Mars’ core separated from its outer layers. His findings suggest that scientists can look to Mars to better understand the building blocks of Earth. The results are out today in the journal, Nature.</p><p>Meanwhile, NASA today announced that it has officially given up on the tough little Martian rover, Spirit. The high-tech dune-buggy-meets-Johnny-Five roamed Mars’s surface for six years, far longer than its designers ever imagined. In the process, it sent back stunning photos and plenty of data that scientists will be gnawing on for years.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="The rover Spirit delivered stunning photos of the Martian surface. (NASA)" class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2011-May/2011-05-25/spirit photo.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 229px;" title="The rover Spirit delivered stunning photos of the Martian surface. (NASA)"></p><p>NASA is still in touch with Spirit’s sibling, Opportunity. Meanwhile, they’re also toiling away on the next Mars rover, Curiosity, set to launch later this year. As Dave Chapelle put it, MARS, um, folks.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/iRygA_sM6lM" width="480"></iframe></p></p> Wed, 25 May 2011 20:57:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blog/clever-apes/2011-05-25/new-insight-origins-mars-87040 Going to Mars...Cheese Castle, that is http://www.wbez.org/blog/steve-dolinsky/2011-05-09/going-marscheese-castle-86086 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//blog/photo/2011-May/2011-05-08/cheesecastle.jpg" alt="" /><p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="caption" height="336" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2011-May/2011-05-04/4644484638_71a63f3beb.jpg" title="glorious curds and whey, from the Mars Cheese Castle" width="365"></p><p>Now that&nbsp;the warmer weather is finally here, it's about that time of year when planning for summer vacations and weekend getaways begins. If you're a Chicagoan, chances are if you've ever made your way to Lake Geneva, the Dells or anywhere else in&nbsp;Wisconsin,&nbsp;you've passed the Mars Cheese Castle. It may seem a little touristy (and forgive the pun, but also a little cheesy), yet it now claims snazzier digs in a renovated building that literally looks like a castle; it's worth a visit.</p><div>The obvious choice is the cheese, but Mars offers much more than the traditional aged cheddar. The fruit-filled cheeses are both tart and sweet. Crumbly white cheddar is filled with apricot and ginger, cranberry, blueberry or cinnamon apple. The bakery is serving up fresh coffee cakes, cookies and a sliced cheesy bread. Mars is also a good place to stock up&nbsp;on beer from the New Glarus brewery. If you've never sampled the craft beer, their famous Spotted Cow is a great place to start.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>If you're stopping for a bite to eat, the menu is limited, but there are a few standouts. The classic ham and cheese is simple but done right with a tender shaved ham and your choice of melted cheese. For something different, yet still very Sconny, the cheddar-bacon-jalapeño bratwurst is an extremely flavorful sandwich. It's crispy on the outside and bursting with juices upon the first bite. Like all sandwiches, it comes with a choice of chips or two different types of homemade potato salad. The problem with stocking up here on a road trip is that not all of the snacks will end up making their way home. Intermittent nibbling is expected.</div></p> Mon, 09 May 2011 11:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blog/steve-dolinsky/2011-05-09/going-marscheese-castle-86086