WBEZ | Guatemala http://www.wbez.org/tags/guatemala Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Unrest in Yemen http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-01/unrest-yemen-110880 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP875148348529.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A group of Houthi rebels are refusing to leave the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, which they took over last month. Nabeel Khoury, a senior fellow of Middle East and national security at The Chicago Council on Global affairs, explains the situation.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-unrest-in-yemen/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-unrest-in-yemen.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-unrest-in-yemen" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Unrest in Yemen" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Wed, 01 Oct 2014 14:08:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-01/unrest-yemen-110880 U.S. begins airstrikes in Syria http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-09-23/us-begins-airstrikes-syria-110835 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP77392218978.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The U.S. and five Arab countries have begun a campaign of airstrikes against the Islamic State in Syria. We&#39;ll take a look at which countries have decided to join the U.S. with Gulf States scholar Joseph Kéchichian.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-u-s-begins-airstrikes-in-syria/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-u-s-begins-airstrikes-in-syria.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-u-s-begins-airstrikes-in-syria" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: U.S. begins airstrikes in Syria" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Tue, 23 Sep 2014 11:41:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-09-23/us-begins-airstrikes-syria-110835 Child migrant expert: The kids will keep coming http://www.wbez.org/news/child-migrant-expert-kids-will-keep-coming-110612 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/unaccompanied minors.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Federal officials recently announced they would close three temporary detention shelters in Oklahoma, Texas and California, in part because the flow of children across the southern U.S. border has slowed. The news comes weeks into a heated debate over what to do about large numbers of unaccompanied minors fleeing Central America.</p><p>But one Chicago expert, recently returned from studying migrant children in Guatemala, believes the slowdown won&rsquo;t last.</p><p>&ldquo;There is a culture of migration where, in many ways, it is a rite of passage that you do start to think about your household, you think about your family, you think about your future at age 13, 14, 15,&rdquo; said Lauren Heidbrink, an anthropologist and Assistant Professor at National Louis University in Chicago.</p><p>Heidbrink has authored a book on the topic, titled <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Migrant-Youth-Transnational-Families-State/dp/0812246047"><em>Migrant Youth, Transnational Families and the State: Care and Contested Interests</em></a>, and recently returned from a field study in the Departments of San Marcos and Quezaltenango in western Guatemala.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s a different cultural context. There are different expectations of young people in Guatemala than we have of a 14-year old in the U.S,&rdquo; said Heidbrink.</p><p>While there, Heidbrink said she witnessed a widespread campaign to dissuade children from making the dangerous journey to the U.S.-Texas border. The U.S. Department of Customs and Border Protection has launched a <a href="http://www.dvidshub.net/unit/USCBP#.U-Kos_ldWSo">multimedia campaign</a> &mdash; which included commissioning a <a href="http://www.dvidshub.net/audio/37278/radio-psa-la-bestia-norte-full-version#.U-Kon_ldWSr">radio tune</a> modeled in the tradition of popular gangster ballads known as <em>narcorridos</em> &mdash; to emphasize the dangers of the journey to children and their families.</p><p>But in the indigenous, subsistence-farm communities where Heidbrink works, the messages are not taking root.</p><p>&ldquo;They know the risks,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;But the risks of remaining outweigh the risks of migration.&rdquo;</p><p>Heidbrink said many children believe subsistence farming won&rsquo;t be enough to support their families &mdash; and that way of life has been further threatened by toxic mining activity nearby. In other parts of Guatemala and Central America, kids may face different hardships. But in most cases, Heidbrink says they decide to leave for the same reason: they see little future where they are.</p><p>&ldquo;People don&rsquo;t want to migrate,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a last resort for many people.&rdquo;</p><p>But Heidbrink said once children make the decision to leave, they&rsquo;re thrown into a vicious cycle. Those that are deported don&rsquo;t bring home the message that they shouldn&rsquo;t make the journey. On the contrary, Heidbrink said it becomes more necessary than ever for the children to try to reach the U.S. again.</p><p>&ldquo;Youth and families are being returned to the very situations that they fled, and nothing has changed,&rdquo; she explained. &ldquo;And in fact, layered on top of that, for many youth, is the added debt it takes to migrate.&rdquo;</p><p>Heidbrink said many families pay smugglers between $7,500 and $10,000 to get their children to the U.S. safely, with whopping monthly interest rates as high as 15 percent. Even with a college education, Heidbrink said most Guatemalans can&rsquo;t earn that kind of money. So many kids feel their only way to pay the debt is to <em>re-</em>migrate.</p><p>Heidbrink believes the U.S.&rsquo;s renewed focus on deporting migrant children faster will only make the problem worse. That&rsquo;s because the stigma of returning to their home without having successfully made it in the U.S. means they feel pressured to try again.</p><p>Additionally, Heidbrink said boys typically face ridicule for wearing different clothes, more hair gel, or listening to different music, upon being deported back to their communities. For girls, there&rsquo;s an assumption that they had to sleep their way to the U.S. &mdash; or that they were raped.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s one family that I&rsquo;m working with who let their community members know their daughter had migrated to Guatemala City to work as a domestic laborer in someone&rsquo;s home, when in fact, she had migrated to the U.S.,&rdquo; said Heidbrink. &ldquo;And when she was apprehended and removed, they met her in Guatemala City&hellip; brought her traditional clothing and told her what story to tell the community so that she could avoid that type of stigmatization in her community.&rdquo;</p><p>She said the children see the U.S. as one of their only ways out of poverty, and emphasizing the dangers of the trip isn&rsquo;t enough to deter them. Instead, she said they might give the decision more pause if they realized how difficult life in the U.S. could be when they get here.</p><p>Daniel Restrepo can attest to that.</p><p>&ldquo;I remember my couple first days, I was so happy because I was made it in the United States,&rdquo; he said. Restrepo was 17 when he made the journey from Colombia three years ago.</p><p>Unlike the children that Heidbrink studies in Guatemala, Restrepo had an easy journey to the U.S.: he came on a plane with a tourist visa.</p><p>But Restrepo said he overstayed that visa because he felt Colombia was too violent and corrupt. He never thought life in the U.S. would also be hard.</p><p>Restrepo said he jumped at the opportunity to be a dishwasher in a restaurant, because his weekly paycheck of $300 was more than he&rsquo;d make in one month in Colombia.</p><p>&ldquo;But I came again to the real world that $300 is nothing,&rdquo; he continued, &ldquo;And I started to owe money, and that&rsquo;s when started the nightmare in the United States.&rdquo;</p><p>Restrepo works two jobs now, as a cook and a valet parking attendant, at downtown Chicago restaurants. He&rsquo;s barely making it. Last week the gas was shut off at his Logan Square studio because he owes $600 in unpaid bills. Restrepo said there are still no opportunities back home, but he&rsquo;s not making much headway here, either.</p><p>Heidbrink said it&rsquo;s been left to other parties &mdash; like non-profits in Guatemala &mdash; to share stories of struggle like Restrepo&rsquo;s.</p><p>&ldquo;People don&rsquo;t talk about those experiences, don&rsquo;t talk about the challenges and poverty that exists in the U.S.,&rdquo; she explained. &ldquo;So there is this idealized image of what it is to be living in America and working in America.&rdquo;</p><p>Heidbrink said, rather than emphasizing the dangers of the journey, the more effective way to convince Central American children to stop migrating to the U.S. may be to tell them what happens once they get here.</p><p><em>Odette Yousef is WBEZ&rsquo;s North Side Bureau reporter. Follow her </em><a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef"><em>@oyousef</em></a><em> and </em><a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud"><em>@WBEZoutloud</em></a><em>.</em></p></p> Thu, 07 Aug 2014 10:51:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/child-migrant-expert-kids-will-keep-coming-110612 Global Activism: Helping the people and ecosystem of Guatemala's cloud forests http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-helping-people-and-ecosystem-guatemalas-cloud-forests-110287 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/cloud forest_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><div><a href="http://www.cloudforestconservation.org/">Community Cloud Forest Conservation</a> (CCFC) works to alleviate poverty and protect Guatemala&rsquo;s tropical cloud forests. They support projects that include reforestation, agricultural biodiversity, education and bird monitoring. CCFC also teamed up with local bird conservationists like <a href="http://chicagoregion.audubon.org/">Audobon Chicago Region</a>, to protect the winter homes of birds that migrate between Guatemala and Chicago. For our Global Activism segment, Founder and director Rob Cahill gives us an update on what he calls &ldquo;the great progress&rdquo; his group has made in the last few months.</div><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/152998102&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> Thu, 05 Jun 2014 11:01:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-helping-people-and-ecosystem-guatemalas-cloud-forests-110287 Syria re-elects Assad as civil war continues http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-05/syria-re-elects-assad-civil-war-continues-110286 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/barrell bombs hospital_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>In the midst of civil war, Syrian President Bashar-al-Assad was reelected in an election widely condemned by Western governments. Dr Zaher Sahloul, president of the Syrian American Medical Society, tells us whether he thinks the election will impact the country&#39;s ongoing humanitarian crisis.&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-syria-re-elects-assad-as-civil-war-conti/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-syria-re-elects-assad-as-civil-war-conti.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-syria-re-elects-assad-as-civil-war-conti" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Syria re-elects Assad as civil war continues" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Thu, 05 Jun 2014 10:53:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-05/syria-re-elects-assad-civil-war-continues-110286 Immigrant father describes overcoming obstacles http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/immigrant-father-describes-overcoming-obstacles-110078 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/140425_Natalie Cruz and her dad Byron Cruz (1).JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Byron Cruz grew up the oldest of three kids as part of a wealthy family in Guatemala. When Byron was young, his dad died and Byron became the man of the house. He struggled to adjust to his new circumstances and was on the verge of being kicked out of high school, when he met his future wife. She helped him graduate and they married and had a daughter. But still they struggled.</p><p>Byron sat down with his daughter Natalie last week at the Latino Cultural Center at UIC. He told her about life in Guatemala when she was a baby. &ldquo;I got to the point that I had one good pair of shoes but if you would flip the shoe you would see that the shoe has one big hole. One day it was raining and I was walking a lot, I was going back to home and I saw you and I thought: I don&rsquo;t want my daughter to live in this way.&rdquo;</p><p>He decided to move to the United States in order to provide a better life for his family. Byron worked in the U.S. for six months, before sending for his family. He didn&rsquo;t know how to speak English and became frustrated when he was blamed for something he didn&rsquo;t do at a job. He went to school to learn English and wound up going to college. Their family grew and became more stable.</p><p>Byron sees himself as a Guatemalan-American. He tells his daughter, &ldquo;I always think about the day that I die, what is going to happen with me. And I wish that they take my ashes and divide it into the two countries because half of my people is over there but the other half is over here.&rdquo;<br />&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F6250422" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Fri, 25 Apr 2014 14:56:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/immigrant-father-describes-overcoming-obstacles-110078 Global Activism: Community Cloud Forest Conservation update on saving Guatemala's forests http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-community-cloud-forest-conservation-update-saving-guatemalas <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/cloud forest.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><a href="http://www.cloudforestconservation.org/">Community Cloud Forest Conservation</a> says it works to alleviate poverty and protect Guatemala&rsquo;s tropical cloud forests. The organization supports a range of projects that include education, reforestation, community development and bird monitoring. They teamed up with Chicago bird conservationists to protect the winter home of the birds that migrate through Chicago.<em> </em></p><p>For our <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism"><em>Global Activism</em></a> segment, <em>Worldview </em>catches up with Rob Cahill, the organization&#39;s founder and Judy Pollock, the director of <a href="http://chicagoregion.audubon.org/birds-wildlife">Bird Conservation</a> for the <a href="http://chicagoregion.audubon.org/">Audubon Chicago Region</a>.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/116888274" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Thu, 24 Oct 2013 09:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-community-cloud-forest-conservation-update-saving-guatemalas No apocalypse? Chicago residents can tell you why http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/no-apocalypse-chicago-residents-can-tell-you-why-104520 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/halseike_mayan.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>You&rsquo;ve heard it all: 2012, apocalypse, end of the world, blah blah blah. But for some Guatemalans and Mexicans in Chicago, December 21 is a time of celebration that has nothing to do with doomsday prophecies.</p><p>In the Mayan tradition December 21 is a major turning of the calendar, the end of an approximately 394-year-long cycle called a Bak&rsquo;tun. It&rsquo;s the 13th Bak&rsquo;tun of the Mayan calendar era, and some say this era will be only 13 Bak&rsquo;tuns long. Translation: time for a new world.</p><p>But in reality, December 21 more closely resembles Y2K than the John Cusack movie &ldquo;2012.&rdquo; It&rsquo;s a big, huge renewal with numeric and astrological significance. Only one Mayan text suggests that it&rsquo;s the end of the world, and people of Mayan descent are more likely to be celebrating than stocking up on bottled water and firearms.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F72090955&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&ldquo;This is a time of reflection and to see what we have done with our lives, with mother nature, and how are we going to move forward in this new era,&rdquo; said Hugo Hun, the Guatemalan consul general of Chicago. He said many Guatemalans will travel to large ceremonies in 13 different cities throughout Guatemala.</p><p>The Bak&rsquo;tun events are also a tourist attraction, but some are concerned that the doomsday hullaballoo is commercializing the Mayan culture.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;The living Mayans are systematically losing the way they used to live and their beliefs as well,&rdquo; Akaze Yotzin said.</p><p>He&rsquo;s the leader of a Chicago group called Nahualli that practices and studies indigenous Mexican traditions. He said poverty and racial stereotypes already endanger Mayan identity in Mexico, and stressed that Mayans are not an ancient people, but a people who are alive today. Nahualli held a ceremony Friday morning at the American Indian Center to celebrate the winter solstice and the turning of the calendar.</p><p><strong>Music and mathematics</strong></p><p>Ancient Mayan culture gave great significance to math and numbers, and the number 13 is considered particularly powerful. The complex numerology of the Mayan calendar system inspired Chicago musician Juan Dies, who produced a song called &quot;13 Bak&#39;tun&quot; with his band Sones de Mexico.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F72124780&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&quot;13 Bak&#39;tun&quot; features 13 parts, each carefully planned to highlight numerology.&nbsp;For example, the second part is in 2/4 time and uses two instruments. The thirteenth has 13 instruments playing in 13/8 time. And guess what - the song is 13 minutes long.</p><p>Dies said the date is important and also misrepresented. His song is part of an effort to correct that. Sones de Mexico has been together for nearly twenty years studying and reinterpreting traditional Mexican music. The tenth part of &quot;13 Bak&#39;tun&quot; features Chicago poet Carlos Mejia performing a poem in&nbsp;Quiche Mayan. According to Dies, Mejia traveled to Guatemala for Dec. 21, 2012 to join the Bak&#39;tun celebrations.</p><p>&quot;I think the Mayans are seeing it today as a closure of a long cycle, very much as we saw the end of our millenium,&quot; Dies said. &quot;Along with that comes an opportunity to renew yourself, to look back at the achievements of the last four hundreds years, and how you may make changes or improvements or a rebirth in the new Bak&rsquo;tun.&quot;</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 21 Dec 2012 05:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/no-apocalypse-chicago-residents-can-tell-you-why-104520 Worldview 4.26.12 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-04-26/worldview-42612-98571 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/IRAQACTORS10457.sJPG_900_540_0_95_1_50_50.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Turkey is working to block official attempts by Israel to attend the NATO summit. Chicago-area businessman and Turkey scholar <a href="http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/boards/dic/members/celebi.asp" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Mehmet Celebi</a> tells <em>Worldview</em> what’s behind the diplomatic tensions. Also, in Iraqi Kurdistan, a student Shakespeare troupe is becoming internationally recognized for performing the Bard’s plays in their original tongue. <em>Worldview</em> speaks with troupe director Peter Friedrich and actor Ahmad Muhammad Taha about Shakespeare’s role in Iraq. And Rob Cahill teamed up with Chicago bird conservationists to protect the winter home of birds that migrate through Chicago by reforesting a section of a Guatemalan cloud forest. Rob tells <em>Worldview</em> about his group, <a href="http://www.cloudforestconservation.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Community Cloud Forest Conservation</a>.</p></p> Thu, 26 Apr 2012 14:16:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-04-26/worldview-42612-98571 Guatemala’s contemporary artists draw on violence to push boundaries http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-11-11/guatemala%E2%80%99s-contemporary-artists-draw-violence-push-boundaries-93949 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-November/2011-11-10/guatart2.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>With the election of a former army general as the country’s next president, the legacy of Guatemala’s long, bloody civil war doesn’t just disappear overnight.</p><p>Increasingly, Guatemala’s past and present mix not only in politics, but also in its contemporary art. Artists like Regina Galindo and Anibal Lopez combine the nation’s violent history with present-day concerns to produce a distinctly Guatemalan style that has garnered international acclaim.</p><p>Emiliano Valdes, an art curator based in Guatemala City, says Guatemalan artists are challenging the country's reputation for producing brightly-colored crafts and pottery.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Video of Regina Galindo's "Who Can Erase the Traces?"</strong></p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/D46p71QdCTc" width="420" frameborder="0" height="315"></iframe></p></p> Fri, 11 Nov 2011 23:02:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-11-11/guatemala%E2%80%99s-contemporary-artists-draw-violence-push-boundaries-93949