WBEZ | Guatemala http://www.wbez.org/tags/guatemala Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Global Activism: Helping the people and ecosystem of Guatemala's cloud forests http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-helping-people-and-ecosystem-guatemalas-cloud-forests-110287 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/cloud forest_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><div><a href="http://www.cloudforestconservation.org/">Community Cloud Forest Conservation</a> (CCFC) works to alleviate poverty and protect Guatemala&rsquo;s tropical cloud forests. They support projects that include reforestation, agricultural biodiversity, education and bird monitoring. CCFC also teamed up with local bird conservationists like <a href="http://chicagoregion.audubon.org/">Audobon Chicago Region</a>, to protect the winter homes of birds that migrate between Guatemala and Chicago. For our Global Activism segment, Founder and director Rob Cahill gives us an update on what he calls &ldquo;the great progress&rdquo; his group has made in the last few months.</div><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/152998102&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> Thu, 05 Jun 2014 11:01:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-helping-people-and-ecosystem-guatemalas-cloud-forests-110287 Syria re-elects Assad as civil war continues http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-05/syria-re-elects-assad-civil-war-continues-110286 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/barrell bombs hospital_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>In the midst of civil war, Syrian President Bashar-al-Assad was reelected in an election widely condemned by Western governments. Dr Zaher Sahloul, president of the Syrian American Medical Society, tells us whether he thinks the election will impact the country&#39;s ongoing humanitarian crisis.&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-syria-re-elects-assad-as-civil-war-conti/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-syria-re-elects-assad-as-civil-war-conti.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-syria-re-elects-assad-as-civil-war-conti" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Syria re-elects Assad as civil war continues" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Thu, 05 Jun 2014 10:53:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-05/syria-re-elects-assad-civil-war-continues-110286 Immigrant father describes overcoming obstacles http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/immigrant-father-describes-overcoming-obstacles-110078 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/140425_Natalie Cruz and her dad Byron Cruz (1).JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Byron Cruz grew up the oldest of three kids as part of a wealthy family in Guatemala. When Byron was young, his dad died and Byron became the man of the house. He struggled to adjust to his new circumstances and was on the verge of being kicked out of high school, when he met his future wife. She helped him graduate and they married and had a daughter. But still they struggled.</p><p>Byron sat down with his daughter Natalie last week at the Latino Cultural Center at UIC. He told her about life in Guatemala when she was a baby. &ldquo;I got to the point that I had one good pair of shoes but if you would flip the shoe you would see that the shoe has one big hole. One day it was raining and I was walking a lot, I was going back to home and I saw you and I thought: I don&rsquo;t want my daughter to live in this way.&rdquo;</p><p>He decided to move to the United States in order to provide a better life for his family. Byron worked in the U.S. for six months, before sending for his family. He didn&rsquo;t know how to speak English and became frustrated when he was blamed for something he didn&rsquo;t do at a job. He went to school to learn English and wound up going to college. Their family grew and became more stable.</p><p>Byron sees himself as a Guatemalan-American. He tells his daughter, &ldquo;I always think about the day that I die, what is going to happen with me. And I wish that they take my ashes and divide it into the two countries because half of my people is over there but the other half is over here.&rdquo;<br />&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F6250422" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Fri, 25 Apr 2014 14:56:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/immigrant-father-describes-overcoming-obstacles-110078 Global Activism: Community Cloud Forest Conservation update on saving Guatemala's forests http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-community-cloud-forest-conservation-update-saving-guatemalas <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/cloud forest.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><a href="http://www.cloudforestconservation.org/">Community Cloud Forest Conservation</a> says it works to alleviate poverty and protect Guatemala&rsquo;s tropical cloud forests. The organization supports a range of projects that include education, reforestation, community development and bird monitoring. They teamed up with Chicago bird conservationists to protect the winter home of the birds that migrate through Chicago.<em> </em></p><p>For our <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism"><em>Global Activism</em></a> segment, <em>Worldview </em>catches up with Rob Cahill, the organization&#39;s founder and Judy Pollock, the director of <a href="http://chicagoregion.audubon.org/birds-wildlife">Bird Conservation</a> for the <a href="http://chicagoregion.audubon.org/">Audubon Chicago Region</a>.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/116888274" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Thu, 24 Oct 2013 09:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-community-cloud-forest-conservation-update-saving-guatemalas No apocalypse? Chicago residents can tell you why http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/no-apocalypse-chicago-residents-can-tell-you-why-104520 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/halseike_mayan.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>You&rsquo;ve heard it all: 2012, apocalypse, end of the world, blah blah blah. But for some Guatemalans and Mexicans in Chicago, December 21 is a time of celebration that has nothing to do with doomsday prophecies.</p><p>In the Mayan tradition December 21 is a major turning of the calendar, the end of an approximately 394-year-long cycle called a Bak&rsquo;tun. It&rsquo;s the 13th Bak&rsquo;tun of the Mayan calendar era, and some say this era will be only 13 Bak&rsquo;tuns long. Translation: time for a new world.</p><p>But in reality, December 21 more closely resembles Y2K than the John Cusack movie &ldquo;2012.&rdquo; It&rsquo;s a big, huge renewal with numeric and astrological significance. Only one Mayan text suggests that it&rsquo;s the end of the world, and people of Mayan descent are more likely to be celebrating than stocking up on bottled water and firearms.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F72090955&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&ldquo;This is a time of reflection and to see what we have done with our lives, with mother nature, and how are we going to move forward in this new era,&rdquo; said Hugo Hun, the Guatemalan consul general of Chicago. He said many Guatemalans will travel to large ceremonies in 13 different cities throughout Guatemala.</p><p>The Bak&rsquo;tun events are also a tourist attraction, but some are concerned that the doomsday hullaballoo is commercializing the Mayan culture.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;The living Mayans are systematically losing the way they used to live and their beliefs as well,&rdquo; Akaze Yotzin said.</p><p>He&rsquo;s the leader of a Chicago group called Nahualli that practices and studies indigenous Mexican traditions. He said poverty and racial stereotypes already endanger Mayan identity in Mexico, and stressed that Mayans are not an ancient people, but a people who are alive today. Nahualli held a ceremony Friday morning at the American Indian Center to celebrate the winter solstice and the turning of the calendar.</p><p><strong>Music and mathematics</strong></p><p>Ancient Mayan culture gave great significance to math and numbers, and the number 13 is considered particularly powerful. The complex numerology of the Mayan calendar system inspired Chicago musician Juan Dies, who produced a song called &quot;13 Bak&#39;tun&quot; with his band Sones de Mexico.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F72124780&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&quot;13 Bak&#39;tun&quot; features 13 parts, each carefully planned to highlight numerology.&nbsp;For example, the second part is in 2/4 time and uses two instruments. The thirteenth has 13 instruments playing in 13/8 time. And guess what - the song is 13 minutes long.</p><p>Dies said the date is important and also misrepresented. His song is part of an effort to correct that. Sones de Mexico has been together for nearly twenty years studying and reinterpreting traditional Mexican music. The tenth part of &quot;13 Bak&#39;tun&quot; features Chicago poet Carlos Mejia performing a poem in&nbsp;Quiche Mayan. According to Dies, Mejia traveled to Guatemala for Dec. 21, 2012 to join the Bak&#39;tun celebrations.</p><p>&quot;I think the Mayans are seeing it today as a closure of a long cycle, very much as we saw the end of our millenium,&quot; Dies said. &quot;Along with that comes an opportunity to renew yourself, to look back at the achievements of the last four hundreds years, and how you may make changes or improvements or a rebirth in the new Bak&rsquo;tun.&quot;</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 21 Dec 2012 05:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/no-apocalypse-chicago-residents-can-tell-you-why-104520 Worldview 4.26.12 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-04-26/worldview-42612-98571 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/IRAQACTORS10457.sJPG_900_540_0_95_1_50_50.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Turkey is working to block official attempts by Israel to attend the NATO summit. Chicago-area businessman and Turkey scholar <a href="http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/boards/dic/members/celebi.asp" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Mehmet Celebi</a> tells <em>Worldview</em> what’s behind the diplomatic tensions. Also, in Iraqi Kurdistan, a student Shakespeare troupe is becoming internationally recognized for performing the Bard’s plays in their original tongue. <em>Worldview</em> speaks with troupe director Peter Friedrich and actor Ahmad Muhammad Taha about Shakespeare’s role in Iraq. And Rob Cahill teamed up with Chicago bird conservationists to protect the winter home of birds that migrate through Chicago by reforesting a section of a Guatemalan cloud forest. Rob tells <em>Worldview</em> about his group, <a href="http://www.cloudforestconservation.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Community Cloud Forest Conservation</a>.</p></p> Thu, 26 Apr 2012 14:16:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-04-26/worldview-42612-98571 Guatemala’s contemporary artists draw on violence to push boundaries http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-11-11/guatemala%E2%80%99s-contemporary-artists-draw-violence-push-boundaries-93949 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-November/2011-11-10/guatart2.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>With the election of a former army general as the country’s next president, the legacy of Guatemala’s long, bloody civil war doesn’t just disappear overnight.</p><p>Increasingly, Guatemala’s past and present mix not only in politics, but also in its contemporary art. Artists like Regina Galindo and Anibal Lopez combine the nation’s violent history with present-day concerns to produce a distinctly Guatemalan style that has garnered international acclaim.</p><p>Emiliano Valdes, an art curator based in Guatemala City, says Guatemalan artists are challenging the country's reputation for producing brightly-colored crafts and pottery.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Video of Regina Galindo's "Who Can Erase the Traces?"</strong></p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/D46p71QdCTc" width="420" frameborder="0" height="315"></iframe></p></p> Fri, 11 Nov 2011 23:02:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-11-11/guatemala%E2%80%99s-contemporary-artists-draw-violence-push-boundaries-93949 How did a general accused of genocide win the Guatemalan presidency? http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-11-11/how-did-general-accused-genocide-win-guatemalan-presidency-93950 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-November/2011-11-10/guatpres1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Guatemala’s new president was a military general during the country’s brutal civil war. Otto Perez Molina won 54 percent of the vote despite accusations that he took part in massacres.</p><p>Perez has never been charged with any atrocities and was one of the army's chief representatives in negotiating the 1996 peace accords. During the campaign he promised to bring security to the country, which has seen a steady increase in violent crime. Kelsey Alford-Jones, the director of the <a href="http://www.ghrc-usa.org/" target="_blank">Guatemala Human Rights Commission/USA</a>, explains why the country voted in a former military leader with ties to a dark past.</p></p> Fri, 11 Nov 2011 18:30:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-11-11/how-did-general-accused-genocide-win-guatemalan-presidency-93950 Worldview 11.11.11 http://www.wbez.org/episode/worldview-111111 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/episode/images/2011-november/2011-11-10/guatart1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Otto Perez Molina is the first former military leader to be elected president in Guatemala since the end of military rule. Despite accusations that he took part in massacres, he promises to bring security to the country, which has seen a steady increase in violent crime. We get analysis from Kelsey Alford-Jones, the director of the <a href="http://www.ghrc-usa.org/" target="_blank">Guatemala Human Rights Commission/USA</a>. Since the 1996 peace accords ended 36 years of civil war, artists in Guatemala have been taking advantage of their new liberties. Emiliano Valdes, a curator based in Guatemala City, discusses how violence and creativity have combined to produce a uniquely Guatemalan style of art. Also, <em>Worldview </em>film contributor <a href="http://www.wbez.org/contributor/milos-stehlik" target="_self">Milos Stehlik</a> reviews <em>Le Havre</em>, the new film by Aki Kaurismäki.</p></p> Fri, 11 Nov 2011 16:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode/worldview-111111 Global Notes: Remembering Facundo Cabral http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-07-20/global-notes-remembering-facundo-cabral-89411 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-July/2011-07-20/obit-facundo-cabraljpg-a5cb78257442749d.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Facundo Cabral, the legendary populist Argentinean singer, was killed July 9 while on tour in Guatemala. He and his concert promoter were on the way to the airport when two vehicles opened fire on their car, bringing a shocking end to one of the most unique journeys in Latin American music. First, we'll hear two Chicagoans from Argentina, Claudia Freed and Marta Farion, reflect on Cabral's legacy. Then, Jerome and <em>Radio M </em>host Tony Sarabia talk with <a href="http://www.elbiobarilari.com/" target="_blank">Elbio Barilari</a>, a composer and professor of Latin Music Studies at the University of Illinois-Chicago, about Cabral’s career and legacy in folk music.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>In the live radio version of this segment, it was erroneously stated that Facundo Cabral's promoter was also killed. The mistake is corrected in this online version.</strong></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Track List</strong></p><p>1. No Soy de Aqui, Ni Soy de Alla</p><p>2. Manhatan Nocturno</p><p>3. Entre Pobres</p><p>4. Este es un Nuevo Día</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Watch a live performance of Facundo Cabral's "No Soy de Aqui, Ni Soy de Alla"</strong></p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/xD3G6eM3tPI" frameborder="0" height="349" width="425"></iframe></p></p> Wed, 20 Jul 2011 16:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-07-20/global-notes-remembering-facundo-cabral-89411