WBEZ | Guatemala http://www.wbez.org/tags/guatemala Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Fighting for rights in Guatemala, Syrian clarinetist uses music for peace http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-04/fighting-rights-guatemala-syrian-clarinetist-uses-music-peace-114357 <p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Fighting for better rights in Guatemala</span><br />Every year, the Guatemalan Human Rights Commission awards the Alice Zachmann Human Rights Defender Award. This year the award went to Prensa Comunitaria (Community Press). It&rsquo;s a community media organization in Huehuetenango, Guatemala. We&rsquo;ll speak with Lorenzo Mateo Francisco. He&rsquo;s a Q&rsquo;anjob&rsquo;al indigenous leader and a member of Prensa Comunitaria. He&rsquo;s also director of the community radio station in Huehuetenango. He&rsquo;ll tell us about how the Guatemalan government shuts down media it views as adversarial.</p><p><em>Guest: Lorenzo Mateo Francisco, Q&rsquo;anjob&rsquo;al indigenous leader and member of Prensa Comunitaria</em></p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Syrian clarinetist uses music to work for peace</span><br />Kinan Azmeh is a world renowned clarinetist. He plays in Yo-Yo Ma&rsquo;s Silk Road Ensemble and he&rsquo;s a musical ambassador for the UN&rsquo;s &ldquo;What Does it Take&rdquo; campaign. It&rsquo;s goal is to draw attention to Syria&rsquo;s four year-long civil war. We talked with Azmeh about his life growing up in Damascus, his career and why putting a stop to war in Syria is his current life&rsquo;s mission. He also performed for us in WBEZ&rsquo;s Jim and Kay Mabie Performance Studio.</p><p><em>Guest: Kinan Azmeh, world renowned clarinetist</em></p></p> Mon, 28 Dec 2015 10:43:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-04/fighting-rights-guatemala-syrian-clarinetist-uses-music-peace-114357 The high stakes of Guatemala's election http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-09-11/high-stakes-guatemalas-election-112909 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Luis%20Soto.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Luis Soto) " /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/223424511&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Tough decisions ahead for Guatemala</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>On Tuesday, former Guatemalan president Otto Pérez Molina was jailed on corruption charges and he&rsquo;s now waiting to stand trial on corruption charges. He was put in jail just hours after resigning from office. Molina maintains his innocence and says the United States may be to blame. In the meantime, elections held in Guatemala this past Sunday failed to elect a new president and will now go to a runoff. Protesters continue to take to the streets to demand change. We&rsquo;ll talk about the political turmoil in Guatemala with Adriana Beltrán, senior associate for citizen security at the Washington Office on Latin America.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="http://twitter.com/Adriana_WOLA">Adriana Beltran</a> is a senior associate for citizen security at the Washignton Office on Latin America (WOLA).&nbsp;</em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/223425535&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The 2015 Telluride Film Festival</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Film contributor Milos Stehlik is just back from the 42nd annual Telluride Film Festival. He&rsquo;ll share some of the highlights, along with Tom Luddy, co-founder of the festival.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-68bba60b-bdf7-66fa-636a-a8da8b450501">Tom Luddy is the co-founder and co-director of the Telluride Film Festival.</span></em></li><li><em><a href="http://twitter.com/milosstelik">Milos Stehlik</a> is the WBEZ film contributor and the director of Facets Multimedia.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/223426014&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">An interview with shodo master Seiran Chiba</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>The Japanese calligraphy art form known as Shodo means &ldquo;way of the brush. &rdquo; Seiran Chiba is a &ldquo;large-scale&rdquo; Shodo master. She is also a special ambassador for the city of Fukushima, known for the catastrophic Daiichi nuclear disaster of 2011. Ms. Chiba is in Chicago to display her work and talk about the intricacies and history of Shodo. We&rsquo;ll ask her what motivates her dedication and her desire to teach others about Shodo.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-68bba60b-bdfb-2197-9ccb-12c5a519c91d">Seiran Chiba is a &ldquo;large-scale&rdquo; Shodo master. </span></em></li><li><em>Wataru Inoue interpreted Ms. Chiba&rsquo;s remarks.</em></li></ul><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-4a77ca8b-be12-efff-6ce7-2152f0db3258"><strong>EVENT:&nbsp;</strong></span><em>Seiran Chiba Shodo (calligraphy) showcase</em></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-4a77ca8b-be12-efff-6ce7-2152f0db3258">Japanese Culture Center,&nbsp;</span>1016 W. Belmont</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-4a77ca8b-be12-efff-6ce7-2152f0db3258">Saturday, September 12th, 2 PM to 3 PM. &nbsp;</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-4a77ca8b-be12-efff-6ce7-2152f0db3258">Part of &nbsp;annual Open House &nbsp;from 12 PM - 4 PM. &nbsp;</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-4a77ca8b-be12-efff-6ce7-2152f0db3258">Event is free, donations accepted</span></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/223426682&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The life and times of Thomas Mapfumo</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Thomas Mapfumo is one of Zimbabwe&rsquo;s most well -known musicians. He&rsquo;s recognized not only for his music but his political activism. Through his music he&rsquo;s advocated for equal rights and been an outspoken critic of government corruption. In 2000, facing pressure and censorship from the government of Zimbabwe, he was forced to leave the country and move to the US, where he&rsquo;s continued his musical career and fight for human rights. Banning Eyre, author of the new biography &ldquo;Lion Songs: Thomas Mapfumo and the Music that made Zimbabwe,&rdquo; joins us to talk about Mapfumo&rsquo;s music and his activism. Thomas Mapfumo performs this weekend in Chicago.</p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-68bba60b-bdfd-8dde-9a5f-4cd0010bd896"><a href="http://twitter.com/banningeyre">Banning Eyre</a> is the senior producer of Afro Pop Worldwide and author of the biography &#39;Lion Songs: Thomas Mapfumo and the Music that made Zimbabwe&#39;. </span></em></p><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 11 Sep 2015 14:33:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-09-11/high-stakes-guatemalas-election-112909 Guatemala's political scandal http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-25/guatemalas-political-scandal-112724 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/220870239&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Impeachment beckons for Guatemala&#39;s president</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>A corruption probe has rocked Guatemala&rsquo;s leading officials. President Perez Molina refuses to step down, despite widespread protests and a supreme court ruling urging further prosecution. Adriana Beltran joins us to discuss the political unrest and what&rsquo;s next for Guatemala. She&rsquo;s a senior associate for citizen security at the Washington Office on Latin America.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong><em>&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/Adriana_WOLA"><span id="docs-internal-guid-e7d09f38-66a4-3fb9-13d0-7b1331199dbb">Adriana </span>Beltrán</a> is a senior associate for Citizen Security at the Washington Office on Latin America.&nbsp;</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/220870711&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">World History Minute: The fall of Pompei</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Historian John Schmidt recalls the fall of Pompei, which happened this week in the year AD 79.</p><p><strong>Guest: </strong><em>John Schmidt is a Professor at the University of Chicago, and author of &#39;On This Day in Chicago&#39;.&nbsp;</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/220871783&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Palestinian minors and the Israeli justice system</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>n 2014, we interviewed Military Watch, an organization that monitors the detention of Palestinian children in Israeli military prisons. We&#39;ll revisit this issue with Brant Rosen, Midwest regional director at the American Friends Service Committee and Rabbi of Tzedek Chicago. He&rsquo;s part of a Chicago coalition that&rsquo;s leading an international campaign to bring awareness to the conditions of Palestinian children being detained by the Israeli military called, &ldquo;No Way to Treat a Child.&rdquo; We&rsquo;ll also talk with Brad Parker, an attorney and International Advocacy officer for Defence for Children International Palestine.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li><em><a href="http://twitter.com/RabbiBrant">&nbsp;</a><span id="docs-internal-guid-e7d09f38-66aa-017c-1153-e448adcbb35a"><a href="http://twitter.com/RabbiBrant">Brant Rosen</a> is the midwest regional director of the American Friends Service Committee, a Rabbi at Tzedek Chicago and co-founder and co-chairperson of the Jewish Voice for Peace Rabbinical Council.</span></em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-e7d09f38-66aa-24c0-b7b7-32ace90073c5">Brad Parker is an attorney and International Advocacy officer for <a href="http://twitter.com/DCIPalestine">Defence for Children International Palestine</a>. </span></em></li><li><em>Gerard Horton and Salwa Duaibis are co-founders of Military Court Watch.</em></li></ul><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 25 Aug 2015 15:49:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-25/guatemalas-political-scandal-112724 Unrest in Yemen http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-01/unrest-yemen-110880 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP875148348529.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A group of Houthi rebels are refusing to leave the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, which they took over last month. Nabeel Khoury, a senior fellow of Middle East and national security at The Chicago Council on Global affairs, explains the situation.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-unrest-in-yemen/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-unrest-in-yemen.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-unrest-in-yemen" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Unrest in Yemen" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Wed, 01 Oct 2014 14:08:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-01/unrest-yemen-110880 U.S. begins airstrikes in Syria http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-09-23/us-begins-airstrikes-syria-110835 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP77392218978.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The U.S. and five Arab countries have begun a campaign of airstrikes against the Islamic State in Syria. We&#39;ll take a look at which countries have decided to join the U.S. with Gulf States scholar Joseph Kéchichian.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-u-s-begins-airstrikes-in-syria/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-u-s-begins-airstrikes-in-syria.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-u-s-begins-airstrikes-in-syria" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: U.S. begins airstrikes in Syria" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Tue, 23 Sep 2014 11:41:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-09-23/us-begins-airstrikes-syria-110835 Child migrant expert: The kids will keep coming http://www.wbez.org/news/child-migrant-expert-kids-will-keep-coming-110612 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/unaccompanied minors.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Federal officials recently announced they would close three temporary detention shelters in Oklahoma, Texas and California, in part because the flow of children across the southern U.S. border has slowed. The news comes weeks into a heated debate over what to do about large numbers of unaccompanied minors fleeing Central America.</p><p>But one Chicago expert, recently returned from studying migrant children in Guatemala, believes the slowdown won&rsquo;t last.</p><p>&ldquo;There is a culture of migration where, in many ways, it is a rite of passage that you do start to think about your household, you think about your family, you think about your future at age 13, 14, 15,&rdquo; said Lauren Heidbrink, an anthropologist and Assistant Professor at National Louis University in Chicago.</p><p>Heidbrink has authored a book on the topic, titled <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Migrant-Youth-Transnational-Families-State/dp/0812246047"><em>Migrant Youth, Transnational Families and the State: Care and Contested Interests</em></a>, and recently returned from a field study in the Departments of San Marcos and Quezaltenango in western Guatemala.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s a different cultural context. There are different expectations of young people in Guatemala than we have of a 14-year old in the U.S,&rdquo; said Heidbrink.</p><p>While there, Heidbrink said she witnessed a widespread campaign to dissuade children from making the dangerous journey to the U.S.-Texas border. The U.S. Department of Customs and Border Protection has launched a <a href="http://www.dvidshub.net/unit/USCBP#.U-Kos_ldWSo">multimedia campaign</a> &mdash; which included commissioning a <a href="http://www.dvidshub.net/audio/37278/radio-psa-la-bestia-norte-full-version#.U-Kon_ldWSr">radio tune</a> modeled in the tradition of popular gangster ballads known as <em>narcorridos</em> &mdash; to emphasize the dangers of the journey to children and their families.</p><p>But in the indigenous, subsistence-farm communities where Heidbrink works, the messages are not taking root.</p><p>&ldquo;They know the risks,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;But the risks of remaining outweigh the risks of migration.&rdquo;</p><p>Heidbrink said many children believe subsistence farming won&rsquo;t be enough to support their families &mdash; and that way of life has been further threatened by toxic mining activity nearby. In other parts of Guatemala and Central America, kids may face different hardships. But in most cases, Heidbrink says they decide to leave for the same reason: they see little future where they are.</p><p>&ldquo;People don&rsquo;t want to migrate,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a last resort for many people.&rdquo;</p><p>But Heidbrink said once children make the decision to leave, they&rsquo;re thrown into a vicious cycle. Those that are deported don&rsquo;t bring home the message that they shouldn&rsquo;t make the journey. On the contrary, Heidbrink said it becomes more necessary than ever for the children to try to reach the U.S. again.</p><p>&ldquo;Youth and families are being returned to the very situations that they fled, and nothing has changed,&rdquo; she explained. &ldquo;And in fact, layered on top of that, for many youth, is the added debt it takes to migrate.&rdquo;</p><p>Heidbrink said many families pay smugglers between $7,500 and $10,000 to get their children to the U.S. safely, with whopping monthly interest rates as high as 15 percent. Even with a college education, Heidbrink said most Guatemalans can&rsquo;t earn that kind of money. So many kids feel their only way to pay the debt is to <em>re-</em>migrate.</p><p>Heidbrink believes the U.S.&rsquo;s renewed focus on deporting migrant children faster will only make the problem worse. That&rsquo;s because the stigma of returning to their home without having successfully made it in the U.S. means they feel pressured to try again.</p><p>Additionally, Heidbrink said boys typically face ridicule for wearing different clothes, more hair gel, or listening to different music, upon being deported back to their communities. For girls, there&rsquo;s an assumption that they had to sleep their way to the U.S. &mdash; or that they were raped.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s one family that I&rsquo;m working with who let their community members know their daughter had migrated to Guatemala City to work as a domestic laborer in someone&rsquo;s home, when in fact, she had migrated to the U.S.,&rdquo; said Heidbrink. &ldquo;And when she was apprehended and removed, they met her in Guatemala City&hellip; brought her traditional clothing and told her what story to tell the community so that she could avoid that type of stigmatization in her community.&rdquo;</p><p>She said the children see the U.S. as one of their only ways out of poverty, and emphasizing the dangers of the trip isn&rsquo;t enough to deter them. Instead, she said they might give the decision more pause if they realized how difficult life in the U.S. could be when they get here.</p><p>Daniel Restrepo can attest to that.</p><p>&ldquo;I remember my couple first days, I was so happy because I was made it in the United States,&rdquo; he said. Restrepo was 17 when he made the journey from Colombia three years ago.</p><p>Unlike the children that Heidbrink studies in Guatemala, Restrepo had an easy journey to the U.S.: he came on a plane with a tourist visa.</p><p>But Restrepo said he overstayed that visa because he felt Colombia was too violent and corrupt. He never thought life in the U.S. would also be hard.</p><p>Restrepo said he jumped at the opportunity to be a dishwasher in a restaurant, because his weekly paycheck of $300 was more than he&rsquo;d make in one month in Colombia.</p><p>&ldquo;But I came again to the real world that $300 is nothing,&rdquo; he continued, &ldquo;And I started to owe money, and that&rsquo;s when started the nightmare in the United States.&rdquo;</p><p>Restrepo works two jobs now, as a cook and a valet parking attendant, at downtown Chicago restaurants. He&rsquo;s barely making it. Last week the gas was shut off at his Logan Square studio because he owes $600 in unpaid bills. Restrepo said there are still no opportunities back home, but he&rsquo;s not making much headway here, either.</p><p>Heidbrink said it&rsquo;s been left to other parties &mdash; like non-profits in Guatemala &mdash; to share stories of struggle like Restrepo&rsquo;s.</p><p>&ldquo;People don&rsquo;t talk about those experiences, don&rsquo;t talk about the challenges and poverty that exists in the U.S.,&rdquo; she explained. &ldquo;So there is this idealized image of what it is to be living in America and working in America.&rdquo;</p><p>Heidbrink said, rather than emphasizing the dangers of the journey, the more effective way to convince Central American children to stop migrating to the U.S. may be to tell them what happens once they get here.</p><p><em>Odette Yousef is WBEZ&rsquo;s North Side Bureau reporter. Follow her </em><a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef"><em>@oyousef</em></a><em> and </em><a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud"><em>@WBEZoutloud</em></a><em>.</em></p></p> Thu, 07 Aug 2014 10:51:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/child-migrant-expert-kids-will-keep-coming-110612 Global Activism: Helping the people and ecosystem of Guatemala's cloud forests http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-helping-people-and-ecosystem-guatemalas-cloud-forests-110287 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/cloud forest_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><div><a href="http://www.cloudforestconservation.org/">Community Cloud Forest Conservation</a> (CCFC) works to alleviate poverty and protect Guatemala&rsquo;s tropical cloud forests. They support projects that include reforestation, agricultural biodiversity, education and bird monitoring. CCFC also teamed up with local bird conservationists like <a href="http://chicagoregion.audubon.org/">Audobon Chicago Region</a>, to protect the winter homes of birds that migrate between Guatemala and Chicago. For our Global Activism segment, Founder and director Rob Cahill gives us an update on what he calls &ldquo;the great progress&rdquo; his group has made in the last few months.</div><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/152998102&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> Thu, 05 Jun 2014 11:01:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-helping-people-and-ecosystem-guatemalas-cloud-forests-110287 Syria re-elects Assad as civil war continues http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-05/syria-re-elects-assad-civil-war-continues-110286 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/barrell bombs hospital_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>In the midst of civil war, Syrian President Bashar-al-Assad was reelected in an election widely condemned by Western governments. Dr Zaher Sahloul, president of the Syrian American Medical Society, tells us whether he thinks the election will impact the country&#39;s ongoing humanitarian crisis.&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-syria-re-elects-assad-as-civil-war-conti/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-syria-re-elects-assad-as-civil-war-conti.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-syria-re-elects-assad-as-civil-war-conti" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Syria re-elects Assad as civil war continues" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Thu, 05 Jun 2014 10:53:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-05/syria-re-elects-assad-civil-war-continues-110286 Immigrant father describes overcoming obstacles http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/immigrant-father-describes-overcoming-obstacles-110078 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/140425_Natalie Cruz and her dad Byron Cruz (1).JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Byron Cruz grew up the oldest of three kids as part of a wealthy family in Guatemala. When Byron was young, his dad died and Byron became the man of the house. He struggled to adjust to his new circumstances and was on the verge of being kicked out of high school, when he met his future wife. She helped him graduate and they married and had a daughter. But still they struggled.</p><p>Byron sat down with his daughter Natalie last week at the Latino Cultural Center at UIC. He told her about life in Guatemala when she was a baby. &ldquo;I got to the point that I had one good pair of shoes but if you would flip the shoe you would see that the shoe has one big hole. One day it was raining and I was walking a lot, I was going back to home and I saw you and I thought: I don&rsquo;t want my daughter to live in this way.&rdquo;</p><p>He decided to move to the United States in order to provide a better life for his family. Byron worked in the U.S. for six months, before sending for his family. He didn&rsquo;t know how to speak English and became frustrated when he was blamed for something he didn&rsquo;t do at a job. He went to school to learn English and wound up going to college. Their family grew and became more stable.</p><p>Byron sees himself as a Guatemalan-American. He tells his daughter, &ldquo;I always think about the day that I die, what is going to happen with me. And I wish that they take my ashes and divide it into the two countries because half of my people is over there but the other half is over here.&rdquo;<br />&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F6250422" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Fri, 25 Apr 2014 14:56:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/immigrant-father-describes-overcoming-obstacles-110078 Global Activism: Community Cloud Forest Conservation update on saving Guatemala's forests http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-community-cloud-forest-conservation-update-saving-guatemalas <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/cloud forest.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><a href="http://www.cloudforestconservation.org/">Community Cloud Forest Conservation</a> says it works to alleviate poverty and protect Guatemala&rsquo;s tropical cloud forests. The organization supports a range of projects that include education, reforestation, community development and bird monitoring. They teamed up with Chicago bird conservationists to protect the winter home of the birds that migrate through Chicago.<em> </em></p><p>For our <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism"><em>Global Activism</em></a> segment, <em>Worldview </em>catches up with Rob Cahill, the organization&#39;s founder and Judy Pollock, the director of <a href="http://chicagoregion.audubon.org/birds-wildlife">Bird Conservation</a> for the <a href="http://chicagoregion.audubon.org/">Audubon Chicago Region</a>.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/116888274" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Thu, 24 Oct 2013 09:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-community-cloud-forest-conservation-update-saving-guatemalas