WBEZ | UniVerse of Poetry http://www.wbez.org/tags/universe-poetry Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Parneshia Jones shares a poem for her stepfather http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/parneshia-jones-shares-poem-her-stepfather-107773 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/2photo credit Rachel Eliza Griffiths.jpg" alt="" /><p><div>This week we hear from Chicago poet Parneshia Jones, who reminds us that poetry is about connection <em>&ndash; </em>with those who have gone before and with the parents, grandparents and friends who surround us. Listen as she remembers the sweetness of sleeping beneath her grandmother&#39;s quilts and shares a poem for her stepfather <em>&ndash; </em>a poem never heard before.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Parneshia Jones</strong>&#39; debut poetry collection, <em>Vessel</em>, is forthcoming from Milkweed Additions. Parneshia is the recipient of the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Award, the Margaret Walker Short Story Award, and the Aquarius Press Legacy Award. Her work has anthologized in publications including, <em>She Walks in Beauty: A Woman&#39;s Journey Through Poems</em> edited by Caroline Kennedy, and <em>The Ringing Ear: Black Poets Lean South</em> edited by Nikky Finney. Jones is a member of the <a href="http://www.affrilachianpoets.org/">Affrilachian Poets</a> and serves on the board of Cave Canem and Global Writes. She currently holds positions as Sales and Subsidiary Rights Manager and Poetry Editor at Northwestern University Press.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>First launched in April 2013 to celebrate National Poetry Month, WBEZ now continues our weekly series, </em>The Gift<em> &ndash; produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of </em>September: Poems<em>. This project is a collaboration with UniVerse of Poetry, a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world. &nbsp;Each piece drops us into a poets&rsquo; inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Wed, 19 Jun 2013 14:24:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/parneshia-jones-shares-poem-her-stepfather-107773 Kwame Dawes sings of Jamaica http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/kwame-dawes-sings-jamaica-107343 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/dawes.png" alt="" /><p><p>Imagination is the seed of empathy &ndash; a centrally important function &ndash; and both the gift and burden of the writer. &nbsp;Here <em>The Gift</em> series producer Stanzi Vaubel talks to poet Kwame Dawes, who writes in many voices, and who laughs that this is the curse of the writer. &ldquo;I live in you, I feel everything,&rdquo; he says to his brother. &nbsp;Here he shares a poem called &ldquo;Impossible Flight&rdquo; in which he observes the 1980 Revolution in Jamaica and tries to hold his brother to earth &ndash; to its beauty and its pains.</p><p><br /><strong>Kwame Dawes</strong> is the author of 16 award-winning books of poetry, including <em>Wisteria</em>, <em>Hope&rsquo;s Hospice</em>, <em>Wheels</em>, and his most recent book of selected poems, <em>Duppy Conquerer</em>, which he reads from here. Dawes has also written novels and scholarly work and plays, fifteen of which have been produced. &nbsp;He has won an Emmy Award for his Pulitzer-supported project &ldquo;LiveHopeLove.com,&rdquo; in which he reported on H.I.V., Aids in post-earthquake Haiti. &nbsp;Dawes was born in Ghana and raised in Jamaica.</p><p><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">First launched in April 2013 to celebrate National Poetry Month, WBEZ now continues our weekly series, </em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/gift" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">The Gift</a><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;&ndash; produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of&nbsp;</em><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">September: Poems</span><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">. This project is a collaboration with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.universeofpoetry.org/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">UniVerse of Poetry</a>, a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world. &nbsp;Each piece drops us into a poets&rsquo; inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.</em></p></p> Thu, 23 May 2013 16:52:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/kwame-dawes-sings-jamaica-107343 Lois Lowry shares the pain and pleasure of memory http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/lois-lowry-shares-pain-and-pleasure-memory-107193 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/lowry310x230.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>In an interview with <em>The Gift</em> series producer Stanzi Vaubel, writer Lois Lowry talked about memory. In her novel,&nbsp;<em>The&nbsp;</em><em>Giver</em>, one person holds the memories for the entire community. When the Giver grows old, someone must be chosen to receive the memories. Jonah, the new receiver, is confused. &quot;I thought there was only us. I thought there was only now,&quot; &nbsp;he says. &nbsp;The Giver replies &quot;No, there&#39;s so much more. &nbsp;There&#39;s all that is elsewhere. All that goes back and back and back. It&#39;s how wisdom comes. It&#39;s how we shape our future.&quot;</p><div>Jonah&#39;s confusion and the Giver&rsquo;s response speaks to us, reflecting the negotiation that must always take place between the present and the past. Can we have one without the other? Can we appreciate the immediacy of the now if we don&#39;t feel the echoes and shouts, insights and wisdom of those who came before?</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The Giver is weighted with his memories. He has been made old and tired by them. But as Jonah begins to receive, he realizes that there is pleasure mixed with pain, that opposite emotions are inextricably linked. That&#39;s what a memory is. &nbsp;Jonah doesn&#39;t understand why the community has sterilized themselves from memory, leading to a one-dimensional existence. What he has experienced from the Giver has changed him, but it is a change that is awakening, and one that he wishes to share.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Lois Lowry</strong> is the author of more than thirty children&rsquo;s books, and an autobiography. She won the Newberry Award for <em>Number the Stars</em> (1989) and <em>The Giver</em> (1993). Two years after <em>The Giver</em> was published, Lowry&rsquo;s son Grey was killed in a fighter plane crash, allowing her to more poignantly examine the pain &ndash; and beauty &ndash; of memory. Lowry continues to write and read from her work. &quot;I am a grandmother now,&rdquo; she wrote on her blog. &ldquo;For my own grandchildren &ndash; and for all those of their generation &ndash; I try, through writing, to convey my passionate awareness that we live intertwined on this planet and that our future depends upon our caring more, and doing more, for one another.&quot;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">First launched in April 2013 to celebrate National Poetry Month, WBEZ now continues our weekly series, </em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/gift" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">The Gift</a><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;&ndash; produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of&nbsp;</em><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">September: Poems</span><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">. This project is a collaboration with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.universeofpoetry.org/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">UniVerse of Poetry</a>, a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world. &nbsp;Each piece drops us into a poets&rsquo; inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.</em></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 17 May 2013 05:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/lois-lowry-shares-pain-and-pleasure-memory-107193 Poet Kate Daniels remembers her delicious baby girl http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/poet-kate-daniels-remembers-her-delicious-baby-girl-107080 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Kate_Daniels_310x230.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Kate Daniels describes herself &ldquo;as a poet who has always been interested in what could not or should not be said.&rdquo; Just in time for Mother&rsquo;s Day, she talks about the truth of motherhood &ndash; its strangeness, its wonder, and its lusciousness. She fearlessly tells of her experiences breast feeding, raising children, and falling in love &ndash; and trusts that these stories of gritty, juicy living have a collective significance. They are not meant to be kept secret but joyously shared.</p><div><strong>Kate Daniels</strong> is a recent recipient of a Guggenheim Award, a Professor of English at Vanderbilt University and author of four volumes of poetry: <em>The White Wave</em> and <em>The Niobe Poems,</em> from the Pitt Poetry Series, and <em>Four Testimonies </em>and <em>A Walk in Victoria&rsquo;s Secret</em>, from LSU Press. Her poetry explores aspects of gender-based and Southern working-class experience.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">First launched in April 2013 to celebrate National Poetry Month, WBEZ now continues our weekly series, </em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/gift" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">The Gift</a><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;&ndash; produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of&nbsp;</em><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">September: Poems</span><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">. This project is a collaboration with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.universeofpoetry.org/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">UniVerse of Poetry</a>, a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world. &nbsp;Each piece drops us into a poets&rsquo; inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Fri, 10 May 2013 06:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/poet-kate-daniels-remembers-her-delicious-baby-girl-107080 Rachel Webster makes the past a destination http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/rachel-webster-makes-past-destination-106962 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/webster_headshot310.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>After a year of conversation about poets and poetry, <em>The Gift</em> poetry series Producer Stanzi Vaubel recorded Rachel Jamison Webster reading from her book, <em>September</em>, and decided to produce this piece not as a conversation but as a direct drop into the poems. &ldquo;I Know Why I Make the Past a Destination,&rdquo; Rachel begins, reminding us of the mystery of time &ndash; how sometimes we can &ldquo;almost, but not quite, remember the future,&rdquo; how we can live days that feel layered with earlier lives, earlier selves. It makes us think about presence, how presence is a kind of fullness of time that suggests the future and past even as it remakes them.</p><div><strong><a href="http://www.racheljamisonwebster.com">Rachel Jamison Webster</a></strong> curator of this series, <em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/gift">The Gift</a></em>, is Artist in Residence at Northwestern University. Her poems and essays have been published in many journals and anthologies, including <em>Poetry</em>, <em>The Paris Review</em> and <em>The Southern Review</em>. Her book of poems,<em> September</em>, was just published by Northwestern University Press.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">First launched in April 2013 to celebrate National Poetry Month, WBEZ now continues our weekly series, </em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/gift" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">The Gift</a><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;&ndash; produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of&nbsp;</em><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">September: Poems</span><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">. This project is a collaboration with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.universeofpoetry.org/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">UniVerse of Poetry</a>, a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world. &nbsp;Each piece drops us into a poets&rsquo; inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.</em></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 03 May 2013 07:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/rachel-webster-makes-past-destination-106962 Jennifer Steele and the poetry of self-discovery http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/jennifer-steele-and-poetry-self-discovery-106845 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Jennifer_The _Gift_310x230.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago is home to many organizations that help young people to express themsleves, including Young Chicago Authors, After School Matters, Street-Level Youth Media, Free Write Jail Arts, and YOUmedia, a learning space housed in Chicago Public Library&rsquo;s Harold Washington Library Center that gives teens access to countless books, innovative technology and mentorship with working artists. &nbsp;</p><div>Series producer Stanzi Vaubel traveled to YOUmedia to talk to young poets and their instructors, which led her into a conversation with teaching artist Jennifer Steele. &nbsp;While they were talking, Jennifer discovered that poetry is a kind of prophecy for her, a way to discover what she does not yet know about herself. &nbsp;Jennifer reminds us of the voice that can speak &ndash; and illuminate &ndash; a little of our own mystery. &nbsp;When we write, we come into contact with memories and &nbsp;feelings &ndash; and also the future selves that are still dreaming, and writing, us into existence. &nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>YOUmedia</strong> was created as an innovative, 21st century teen learning space that works to connect young adults, books, media, mentors, and institutions throughout the city of Chicago in one dynamic space designed to inspire collaboration and creativity. &nbsp;Mentors from Digital Youth Network as well as Chicago Public Library librarians lead workshops to help teens build their skills and create digital artifacts &ndash; from songs to videos to photography to blogs. &nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Jennifer Steele</strong> is a teaching artist for various organizations around the city of Chicago including Hands On Stanzas, Camp of Dreams, and Young Chicago Authors. Her poems have appeared in <em>Columbia Poetry Review</em>, <em>Caduceus</em>, <em>Warpland Journal</em>, and <em>Beltway Quarterly Online</em>. She received her B.M. from Howard University and her M.F.A. from Columbia College Chicago.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>In celebration of National Poetry Month, WBEZ presents </em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/gift">The Gift</a><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/gift"> </a>&ndash; produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of September: Poems. This project is a collaboration with <a href="http://www.universeofpoetry.org/">UniVerse of Poetry</a>, a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world. &nbsp;Each piece drops us into a poets&rsquo; inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Fri, 26 Apr 2013 09:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/jennifer-steele-and-poetry-self-discovery-106845 Linda Hogan sees the return of the buffaloes http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/linda-hogan-sees-return-buffaloes-106714 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Hogan310x230.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>This interview with Chickasaw poet Linda Hogan was one of the first that was done for <em>The Gift</em> poetry series. It dropped producers Stanzi Vaubel and Rachel Webster immediately into the depths <em>&ndash; </em>into the roots of hunger, where we are connected to life and to the animals.&nbsp; Soon after, these words by philosopher Martha Nussbaum were discovered by them:</p><p>&quot;We do not automatically see another human being as spacious and deep, having thoughts,&nbsp;spiritual longings, and emotions. It is all too easy to see another person as just a body which we&nbsp;might just think we can use for our ends, bad or good. It is an achievement to see a soul in that&nbsp;body and this achievement is supported by poetry and the arts which asks us to wonder about the&nbsp;inner world of that shape we see <em>&ndash;</em> and too, to wonder about ourselves and our own depths.&quot;</p><p>And in this way, Linda Hogan became the embodiment of soul <em>&ndash; </em>by sharing so much, by telling stories of dolphins and horses, and by living her belief in each creature&#39;s fullness.</p><p><strong><a href="http://www.lindahoganwriter.com/">Linda Hogan</a></strong> is Writer in Residence for the&nbsp;Chickasaw Nation and author of several award-winning works of fiction, poetry and non-fiction, including&nbsp;the memoir, <em>The Woman Who Watches Over the World</em>.&nbsp; Here she reads from her book of&nbsp;poetry, <em>The Book of Medicines</em>.</p><p><em>In celebration of National Poetry Month, WBEZ presents&nbsp;</em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/gift">The Gift</a><em>&nbsp;&ndash; produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of&nbsp;</em>September:&nbsp;Poems<em>. This project is a collaboration with<a href="http://www.universeofpoetry.org/">&nbsp;UniVerse of Poetry</a>, a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world.&nbsp; Each piece drops us into a poets&rsquo; inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 19 Apr 2013 09:01:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/linda-hogan-sees-return-buffaloes-106714 The 6th Annual Spring Writers' Festival - A Reading by D.A. Powell http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/6th-annual-spring-writers-festival-reading-da-powell-107109 <p><p><strong>D.A. Powell</strong>&nbsp;gives a reading as part of the Northwestern University English Department 6th Annual Creative Writers&#39; Festival. D. A. Powell is the author of a trilogy of books, including <em>Tea</em> (Wesleyan, 1998);<em> Lunch</em> (2000); and <em>Cocktails</em> (Graywolf, 2004), which was nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His most recent book, <em>Chronic</em> (2009) received the Kingsley Tufts Award and was nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award.</p><div>His subjects range from movies, art, and other trappings of contemporary culture to the AIDS pandemic. Powell&rsquo;s work often returns to AIDS, and his three collections have been called a trilogy about the disease. As Carl Phillips wrote, in his judge&rsquo;s note for Boston Review&rsquo;s Annual Poetry Award, of Powell&rsquo;s work, &quot;No fear, here, of heritage nor of music nor, refreshingly, of authority. Mr. Powell recognizes in the contemporary the latest manifestations of a much older tradition: namely, what it is to be human.&quot;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Powell has received a Paul Engle Fellowship from the James Michener Center, a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Lyric Poetry Award from the Poetry Society of America, among other awards. He has taught at Columbia University, the University of Iowa, Sonoma State University, San Francisco State University, and served as the Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in Poetry at Harvard University. He currently teaches at the University of San Francisco, and edits the online magazine <em>Electronic Poetry Review</em>.</div><p>D. A. Powell was born in Albany, Georgia on May 16, 1963. He attended the University of San Francisco, obtaining his bachelor&#39;s degree in 1991, and his master&#39;s in 1993. He then went on to receive his M.F.A. from the Iowa Writer&rsquo;s Workshop in 1996.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/UNV-webstory_14.jpg" style="float: left;" title="" /></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Recorded live Tuesday, April 16, 2013 at the&nbsp;Hilton Orrington.&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 16 Apr 2013 14:50:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/6th-annual-spring-writers-festival-reading-da-powell-107109 A tribute to poet Richard Fammerée http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-05-11/tribute-poet-richard-fammer%C3%A9e-86375 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-May/2011-05-11/00-fammeree_schulman.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><a href="http://fammeree.com/" target="_blank">Richard Fammerée</a> died on Thursday, May 5, of Lou Gehrig’s disease. The poet, composer and singer founded <a href="http://www.universeofpoetry.org/" target="_blank">UniVerse of Poetry</a>. The group’s mission is universal dialogue, compassion and peace.</p><p>On Sunday, May 15, members of UniVerse will gather at the <a href="http://www.explorechicago.org/city/en/supporting_narrative/attractions/dca_tourism/Chicago_Cultural_Center.html" target="_blank">Chicago Cultural Center</a> to celebrate Fammerée. The ceremony won’t be traditional, which is fitting, because Fammerée was known for being a bit of a wanderer. A few years ago, he spoke to freelance radio producer Stanzi Vaubel.</p><p><em>Music Button: Joel Styzens, "It Was", from the CD Relax Your Ears, (A Sharp)</em></p></p> Wed, 11 May 2011 14:06:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-05-11/tribute-poet-richard-fammer%C3%A9e-86375