WBEZ | cancer http://www.wbez.org/tags/cancer Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Once a Catholic priest, now a father of two http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/once-catholic-priest-now-father-two-112313 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/StoryCorps Francis Alicia Riley bh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Francis Riley was a Catholic priest during the late 1960s. Riley later left the priesthood and became a husband and father. He came to the Chicago StoryCorps booth in May with his wife Margaret and their daughter Alicia. Alicia asked her dad about the ways his time in the priesthood changed him.</p><p><em>StoryCorps&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. These excerpts, edited by WBEZ, present some of our favorites from the current visit, as well as from previous trips.</em></p></p> Fri, 03 Jul 2015 15:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/once-catholic-priest-now-father-two-112313 Afternoon Shift: Suntans, skincare and ‘colorism’ http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-06-01/afternoon-shift-suntans-skincare-and-%E2%80%98colorism%E2%80%99-112120 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Flickr%20Alejandro%20Arango.jpg" style="height: 414px; width: 620px;" title="(Photo: Flickr/Alejandro Arango)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208339373&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Cultural attitudes on sun exposure and skincare</span><br />June marks the arrival of sun tanning season and despite years of skin cancer warnings, many of us still can&rsquo;t get enough of the sun&rsquo;s browning rays. But not all cultures have the same love affair with the sun. They go to great lengths to avoid it, and sometimes not just for health reasons. We talk to Dr. June Robinson, a Research Professor of Dermatology at &nbsp;Northwestern&rsquo;s Feinberg School of Medicine, as well as scholars and activists who look at the issue of colorism.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-53dbac79-b126-d4b7-6b40-9815c43487bc"><a href="http://www.feinberg.northwestern.edu/faculty-profiles/az/profile.html?xid=12499">Dr. June Robinson</a></span> is a research professor of dermatology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-53dbac79-b126-d4b7-6b40-9815c43487bc"><a href="http://www.mills.edu/academics/faculty/soc/mhunter/mhunter.php">Margaret Hunter</a></span> is a professor of sociology at Mills College in Oakland, California.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-53dbac79-b126-d4b7-6b40-9815c43487bc"><a href="https://twitter.com/SLWrites">Sarah Webb</a></span> is a writer and activist, who created the site <a href="http://colorismhealing.org/">colorismhealing.org.</a> </em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208339758&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-size: 24px;">Challenges of urban beekeeping</span><br />Who would steal three hives full of live bees? Someone who knows how much they&rsquo;re worth, speculates beekeeper and founder of Bike a Bee, Jana Kinsman. Bee rustlers recently hit one of her hives on Chicago&rsquo;s southwest side in McKinley Park. Jana joins us to talk about the value of bees and their honey amid mass bee deaths around the world.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guest:</strong><em> <a href="http://www.janakinsman.com/">Jana Kinsman</a> is a beekeeper and the founder of <a href="http://www.bikeabee.com/">Bike a Bee</a>.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208341541&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-size: 24px;">Federal legislation to ban microbeads receives bipartisan support</span><br />Those tiny scrubbing beads used in face wash and other cosmetics may soon be banned in the US. Great Lakes environmentalists have been concerned about their presence for years citing, among other concerns, fish confusing the plastic beads for food. The Microbead-Free Waters Act of 2015 has bipartisan support including from Illinois Senator Mark Kirk, and seeks to &ldquo;prohibit the sale or distribution of cosmetics containing synthetic plastic microbeads&rdquo; by January of 2018. Sherri Mason is an associate professor of chemistry at the State University of New York, Fredonia and has been studying this issue. She joins us to discuss the environmental impact of microbeads.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="http://www.fredonia.edu/chemistry/Faculty/Mason.asp">Dr. Sherri Mason</a> is a Professor of Chemistry at The State University of New York at Fredonia.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208341632&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-size: 24px;">Chicago strives for &#39;nerd&#39; status</span><br />Since coming into office, Mayor Emanuel has been pushing to make Chicago one of the nation&rsquo;s major tech hubs. But have we succeeded in becoming a so-called &ldquo;Nerdopolis?&rdquo; Amy Merrick is one of the authors of the article, &ldquo;Welcome to Nerdopolis&rdquo;, this summer&rsquo;s cover article for Capital Ideas, the research magazine for The University of Chicago&rsquo;s Booth School of Business. She joins us to discuss the state of tech in Chicago.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/amyjmerrick">Amy Merrick </a>is the co-author of &ldquo;Welcome to Nerdopolis,&rdquo; in Capital Ideas Magazine.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208341924&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-size: 24px;">Tech Shift: Thousands to take part in National Day of Civic Hacking</span><br />Thousands of people across the country are taking part in the third annual National Day of Civic Hacking. Groups in more than 100 cities will meet to design apps, websites and services to try to solve problems in their communities. Chicago is hosting four events in 2015, with goals from improving &nbsp;neighborhoods to creating more sustainable fisheries. Christopher Whitaker, the Chicago Brigade Captain for Code for America, and Steven Philpott, a Social Ventures Fellow at the Center for Neighborhood Technology, join us along with Kelly Borden, the Citizen Science Education Lead at Adler Planetarium, to fill us in on this year&rsquo;s event.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-53dbac79-b12d-8775-af9a-6da80f3e7ff8"><a href="https://twitter.com/civicwhitaker">Christopher Whitaker</a></span> is the Chicago Brigade Captain for Code for America.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-53dbac79-b12d-8775-af9a-6da80f3e7ff8"><a href="http://www.cnt.org/staff/steven-philpott">Steven Philpott</a></span> is the social ventures fellow for the Center for Neighborhood Technology.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-53dbac79-b12d-8775-af9a-6da80f3e7ff8"><a href="https://twitter.com/bordenkelly">Kelly Borden</a></span> is the citizen science education lead at Adler Planetarium.&nbsp;</em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208341561&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-size: 24px;">Blackhawks head to Tampa for Stanley Cup play</span><br />The Blackhawks left for Tampa Bay on Monday to get ready for the Stanley Cup. Game One against the Lightning is Wednesday night. WBEZ&rsquo;s Cheryl Raye-Stout has more.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/Crayestout">Cheryl Raye-Stout</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s sports contributor.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208341647&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-size: 24px;">Projects abound for Chicago Transit Authority</span><br />The Yellow line is still down, a pilot program for Purple line express service to Evanston begins Monday, and debate continues over the Chicago Transit Authority&#39;s proposed Red and Purple Modernization project. Joining us for an update on some of what&#39;s going on with public transit is CTA spokesperson Brian Steele.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/brianksteele">Brian Steele </a>is a spokesperson for the CTA.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208341639&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-size: 24px;">EPA increase on ethanol impacts Midwest agriculture</span><br />If you thought Bears/Packers or Cubs/White Sox were big rivalries, that&rsquo;s nothing compared to Big Oil vs Big Corn. The two sides are locked in a battle over the amount of ethanol to be blended into the nation&rsquo;s fuel supply. The production of ethanol is vitally important to the agricultural economies of both Illinois and Indiana. The Environmental Protection Agency recently announced it would increase the amount of ethanol used in gasoline but not as much as ethanol producers wanted. WBEZ&rsquo;s Michael Puente joins us to discuss what new limits might mean for agriculture and the oil industry.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/MikePuenteNews">Mike Puente</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s Northwest Indiana Bureau reporter.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208341651&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-size: 24px;">New cancer trial to focus on genetics</span><br />The details of a groundbreaking cancer study were announced Monday in Chicago, where researchers are meeting for the conference of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Most cancer treatment revolves around the type of cancer a patient has. But in a new trial starting in July, the focus will be on the genes. Patients will have their tumor genes sequenced in order to determine which drugs will be administered. Dr. Jeff Abrams, Acting Director for Clinical Research and Associate Director of the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program in the National Cancer Institute&rsquo;s Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, joins with details on the new trial.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="http://ctep.cancer.gov/branches/oad/bios/abrams.htm">Dr. Jeff Abrams</a> is NCI Acting Director for Clinical Research and also is Associate Director of the CTEP.</em></p></p> Mon, 01 Jun 2015 16:55:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-06-01/afternoon-shift-suntans-skincare-and-%E2%80%98colorism%E2%80%99-112120 Tight-knit family remembers their mom http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/tight-knit-family-remembers-their-mom-111859 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/StoryCorps 150409 Moran Family bh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Susan Moran couldn&rsquo;t leave the country to go to her mother&rsquo;s funeral in England.</p><p>Moran moved to the United States in the mid-nineties with her husband and kids. They tried to get a green card at that time, but when her mom died, Moran still didn&rsquo;t have the&nbsp; paperwork necessary to leave the U.S.</p><p>In May 2013, she was diagnosed with gallbladder cancer. Four rounds of chemotherapy didn&rsquo;t eliminate it and it spread. She was given four months to live.</p><p>When Susan Moran visited the StoryCorps booth in 2013, her son Sean asked her how she wanted to spend the remainder of her life. &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve got an amazing family,&rdquo; she said, &ldquo;that won&rsquo;t let me go anywhere easily. That&rsquo;s for sure.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t want to go,&rdquo; Susan continued. &ldquo;Too many things to see.&rdquo;</p><p>At the time of the 2013 interview, Moran had just received a temporary green card, which enabled her to leave the country for the first time in 20 years, to travel to England to see her father, and her mother&rsquo;s grave.</p><p>As soon as she got back from that trip and touched down at the airport, she was in immense pain. She was driven straight from the airport to the hospital.</p><p>Susan Moran died January 28, 2014.</p><p>A little over a year after her death, her kids came back to the StoryCorps booth with their dad - Kailey Povier, 35, Liam Moran, 30, and Sean Moran, 32.</p><p>&ldquo;She had a very sweet voice,&rdquo; Sean Moran says, after re-listening to their earlier interview.</p><p>Liam says their mom didn&rsquo;t consider her own feelings enough. She was always too concerned with everyone else, and not worried enough about her own well-being, he says.</p><p>Sean Moran remembers the parties the family used to throw at their house. One time, in particular stood out in his mind: His mom&rsquo;s sister Jenny was visiting and they put &ldquo;Crazy&rdquo; by Cee-Lo Green on repeat. They&rsquo;d dance like mad and when it was over, they&rsquo;d hit repeat and start dancing again, trying to get others to dance with them the whole while.</p><p>&ldquo;You&rsquo;d think that it would be quiet,&rdquo; Kailey says, about her mom&rsquo;s last days. &ldquo;But it was a full house of family and friends.&rdquo; Kailey remembers a few days before her mom died, they were passing around a box of chocolates. Her mom could barely communicate, but she managed to lift a finger and point at the nurse. Everyone agrees: That was there mother&rsquo;s way of making sure her family offered the nurse some chocolate too.</p><p>&ldquo;She was always thinking of other people,&rdquo; Kailey says. &ldquo;We need mom here to help get us through this.&rdquo;<br />&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 10 Apr 2015 14:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/tight-knit-family-remembers-their-mom-111859 Grilled meats serve up dangerous compounds, but you can avoid some http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/grilled-meats-serve-dangerous-compounds-you-can-avoid-some-110214 <p><p>For many, Memorial Day weekend means it&rsquo;s finally time to bust out two things: the white shoes and blackened meats.&nbsp;</p><p>American dads may take pride in their cross-hatch grill marks, but those juicy, charred slabs of meat are coming under incresing scrutiny for the dangerous compounds they develop when protein meets dry blazing heat.</p><p>These include heterocyclic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and advanced glycation end products or HCAs, PAHs and AGEs.</p><p>Peter Guengerich is a biochemistry professor at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He&rsquo;s been studying HCAs and PAHs for 25 years, and he says that, on their own, the compounds aren&#39;t all that dangerous.</p><p>&ldquo;But our bodies have enzyme systems that convert these into reactive compounds,&rdquo; Guengerich said. &ldquo;Things that get stuck irreversibly on your DNA and can cause mutations and potentially cancer, most commonly colon cancer.&rdquo;</p><p>It&rsquo;s important to note that this has little to do with charcoal vs. gas or other fuels.</p><p>Dr Jaime Uribarri of Mount Sinai Medical Center says what matters are the AGEs &mdash; the crispy, browned, tasty bits that form on the outside of grilled meat and other foods.&nbsp; In the kitchen they&rsquo;re considered flavor, but in most medical labs, Uribarri says, they&rsquo;re linked to inflammation that causes &ldquo;diabetes, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, dementia and essentially most of the chronic medical conditions of modern times.&rdquo;</p><p>In fact, recent Mount Sinai research shows that mice fed a diet high in AGEs &mdash; similar to a Western diet &mdash; developed marked cognitive decline and precursors to Alzheimers disease and diabetes. Those fed a low-AGE diet were free of those conditions.&nbsp;</p><p>So does this mean an end to the all-American cookout?&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;If it is something done only once a year it may not be that bad,&rdquo; Uribarri says.</p><p>Only once a year?</p><p>Professor Guengerich won&rsquo;t go that far, but he does urge moderation.</p><p>&ldquo;Well basically if you only eat these things occasionally, [I&rsquo;m] probably not too concerned,&rdquo; the biochemist said. &ldquo;But if you are making a habit of eating these things every other day, grilled at high temperatures, you probably should think about it a little bit more.&rdquo;</p><p>But before you put away the Weber you should know there are lots of ways to cut down on these compounds at your barbecue.</p><p>To reduce the AGE&rsquo;s, Uribarri suggests a few things.</p><p>&ldquo;Make sure the meat is not left for very long periods of time on the grill,&rdquo; he says. &ldquo;Whenever possible, the meat should be marinated or freshened with juices during the cooking. And simultaneously, eat a lot of fruits vegetables and things that will kind of antagonize the bad effects of these compounds.&rdquo;</p><p>These would include antioxidant rich foods like blueberries, pomegranates and cherries &mdash; one Michigan butcher even blends them into his burger meat.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/blueberries.jpg" title="Eating antioxidant rich foods like blueberries, cherries and pomegranates with grilled foods may help reduce the harmful effects of grilling byproducts. (WBEZ/MONICA ENG) " /></div><p>Studies also show that marination in wine, vinegar or lemon juice can lower the meat&rsquo;s pH and cut way down on the formation of AGE and HCA. Another study shows that rubbing meat with fresh rosemary can cut HCA development most entirely.</p><p>Guengerich says you should also cover your grill with foil to avoid carcinogenic flare ups that produce PAHs on the surface.</p><p>&ldquo;And if you are particularly concerned you can preheat [the meat] in a microwave and get the juice out,&rdquo; he says. &ldquo;Then take it out and put it on the grill and you&rsquo;ll actually reduce your exposure by about 90 percent and you won&rsquo;t lose that much in the way of taste either.&rdquo;</p><p>Then there&rsquo;s the low-tech method of simply scraping off what Guengerich calls &quot;the black crud&quot; from the outside of your food. Those grill marks are rich in these carcinogenic compounds.<br /><br />Fans of cole slaw, broccoli and Brussels sprouts may also have more leeway. One study found that regular consumption of these cruciferous vegetables can help clear DNA damage wrought by the grilling process.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>And finally, Uribarri suggests simply swapping the dry high heat cooking for gentler water based methods most of the time.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;So take for example a piece of meat,&rdquo; he says. &ldquo;You put it on the grill to cook for half an hour, you generate so many AGEs. Then you take the same piece of meat, but now you put it under a lot of water to cook as a stew, you generate much much fewer. &ldquo;&nbsp;</p><p>This may be effective, but will anyone really want to come over to your house this summer for a burger boil?</p><p>Wiviott doesn&rsquo;t think so.<br /><br />&ldquo;No one wants to eat nine ounces of poached chicken or turkey breast,&rdquo; the pitmaster of Barn &amp; Company says.</p><p>&quot;Conversely, if you grill it and you have texture and crunch and flavor and salt and fat, that&rsquo;s when something really tastes good.&quot;</p><p>Wiviott is the author of &ldquo;Low and Slow: Master the Art of Barbecue in FIve Easy Lessons.&rdquo; And he finds&nbsp; it hard to swallow all the recent science deriding his favorite foods.</p><p>&quot;In my lifetime, I&rsquo;ve seen coffee be not good for you; now it&rsquo;s good for you. Red wine not good for you; now it&rsquo;s good for you.&nbsp; Butter, pig fat. Margarine was good for you and now it&rsquo;s not,&rdquo; he says. &ldquo;I mean, since the cavemen started cooking, people have cooked their meat over an open fire and we&rsquo;re still around. So I can&rsquo;t imagine that it&rsquo;s all that bad for you&hellip;.Plus, it&rsquo;s absolutely delicious.&quot;</p><p>So does this mean you have to choose between boiled meat or colon cancer? Between long life and a char-striped hot dog?</p><p>&ldquo;Well it is a carcinogen,&rdquo; Guengerich says. &ldquo;But I don&rsquo;t want people to have a guilty conscience or feel like they are going to get cancer tomorrow. Just be moderate about your consumption of anything. Grilled foods included.&quot;</p><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Farmers-market-cabbage.jpg" style="width: 620px;" title="Regular consumption of cruciferous vegetables like cabbage, broccoli and Brussels sprouts can help clear DNA damage from byproducts of grilled meats. (WBEZ/MONICA ENG) " /></div><p><strong>Tips for Reducing Grilled Food Dangers</strong></p><p>If you don&rsquo;t want to give up grilling meat all together, experts say, there are several ways to reduce the formation and your consumption of heterocyclic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and advanced glycation end products. Here are some of them:</p><ul><li>Pre-cook your meat in a pot of water, a low-temperature oven or microwave before finishing briefly on the grill.</li><li>Cover grill with foil to reduce drips and flare ups, which produce PAHs, or consider wrapping your meat in foil before placing it on the grill.&nbsp;</li><li>Marinate meat with vinegar, lemon juice or wine for at least 10 minutes before grilling. This can alter its pH, thus reducing the formation of AGEs during cooking.</li><li>Rub your meat with rosemary or other antioxidant rich fresh herbs before cooking.</li><li>Before eating, scrape off the carcinogenic &ldquo;black crud&rdquo; that may develop on meat or other foods during grilling.</li><li>Remove browned and blackened chicken skin before eating.</li><li>Eat cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts and other cruciferous vegetables on a regular basis to provide your body with sulforaphane, which has been known to help clear DNA damaging compounds more quickly.</li><li>Eat antioxidant rich, deeply colored fruits and vegetables with your grilled meats to help counter the effects of the compounds.&nbsp;</li><li>Consider a weenie boil rather than a weenie roast. You will produce many fewer AGEs in the process.&nbsp;</li></ul></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 21 May 2014 11:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/grilled-meats-serve-dangerous-compounds-you-can-avoid-some-110214 Morning Shift: Memorable Oscar snubs and surprises http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-02-28/morning-shift-memorable-oscar-snubs-and-surprises <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Cover Flickr lincolnblues.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We take a look at some of the biggest upsets in Oscar history. Also, the writer of a new play about cancer stops by to talk about his dad, games shows and aliens.&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-memorable-oscar-snubs-and-surprises/embed?header=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-memorable-oscar-snubs-and-surprises.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-memorable-oscar-snubs-and-surprises" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Memorable Oscar snubs and surprises" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Fri, 28 Feb 2014 08:41:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-02-28/morning-shift-memorable-oscar-snubs-and-surprises Couple survives year full of cancer http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/couple-survives-year-full-cancer-109661 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/RS7424_chi000469_g2-scr.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>The year 2002 was difficult for both Carly and Larry Zabinski.</p><p>The year before the couple started dating, Carly learned her mother had brain cancer. And months later, Larry found out he had a form of cancer himself.</p><p>Carly said while she was attending college, she and her parents noticed her Mom was growing forgetful. They didn&rsquo;t make much of it at first &ndash; they just joked that her Mom was getting older.</p><p>Then one day, her Mom woke up screaming: She&rsquo;d lost her sight in one eye. Carly was really sick herself, so her Dad came home from work and took her Mom to the emergency room.</p><p>CARLY: About two hours later, I got a phone call that woke me up out of my sleep, and there was no sound on the other line &hellip;.And then I heard my Dad crying &hellip;. I remember telling myself, &lsquo;This is the start of something big, and it&rsquo;s not good.&rsquo;</p><p><em>To hear how Carly and Larry Zabinski dealt with double cases of cancer in a year, and how humor helped them get through, check out the audio above.</em></p><p><em>WBEZ&rsquo;s Lynette Kalsnes produced this edited excerpt. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/LynetteKalsnes">@LynetteKalsnes</a>.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F6250422" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 07 Feb 2014 16:17:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/couple-survives-year-full-cancer-109661 Illinois governor signs teen tanning ban http://www.wbez.org/sections/lifestyle/illinois-governor-signs-teen-tanning-ban-108428 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/tanning.png" alt="" /><p><p>As a young woman, Donna Moncivaiz would go to tanning salons looking for that perfect summer glow.</p><p>Now 51, Moncivaiz suffers from late-stage melanoma and says the cancer has spread to her lymph nodes, gall bladder, liver and brain. The Beach Park mother also allowed her daughter to tan and, at 25, she too was diagnosed with early-stage melanoma.</p><p>Doctors attribute both women&#39;s melanoma to tanning beds and time spent outside without sunscreen, and that&#39;s why Moncivaiz has been among the most vocal supporters of proposed legislation that Gov. Pat Quinn signed Thursday to ban indoor tanning in Illinois for anyone younger than 18.</p><p>&quot;I don&#39;t want any mom to feel the guilt I feel, or go through what I&#39;m going through,&quot; said Moncivaiz, who testified in favor of the bill during the spring legislative session.</p><p>Quinn signed the bill along with a measure that prohibits anyone under age 18 from smoking electronic cigarettes.</p><p>&quot;I am signing these new laws today so that our youth and their families can be spared the consequences of very serious and preventable health problems that are caused by dangerous habits formed at a young age,&quot; Quinn said. &quot;Together these measures will protect the health of Illinois youth and save lives in the long-run.&quot;</p><p>On the tanning issue, Quinn&#39;s decision meant he agreed with critics that the health concerns merit government prohibition, rather than merely leaving the choice of tanning to youths and their parents, as industry officials had argued as the legislation was debated by lawmakers.</p><p>Dr. Judy Knox, a dermatologist from Springfield, has long advocated for a teen tanning ban, saying sometimes parents don&#39;t know their kids are using tanning beds. She said ten sessions in a tanning bed doubles the risk for melanoma.</p><p>&quot;The younger you are the more time you have then to develop that cancer,&quot; Knox said. &quot;There&#39;s still a huge myth that people think a tan is healthy.&quot;</p><p>The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the World Health Organization say natural and artificial ultraviolet radiation are cancer-causing substances, and in May the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a proposed order for stricter regulations on indoor tanning devices. The American Academy of Dermatology says minors shouldn&#39;t use indoor tanning equipment because overexposure to ultraviolet radiation can lead to skin cancer.</p><p>The new law bans teens from using equipment that emits ultraviolet radiation, including sun lamps and tanning booths. They also cannot use tanning beds that emit certain electromagnetic radiation wavelengths. The bill doesn&#39;t apply to devices used in private residences, phototherapy devices used by physicians or spray tans.</p><p>Some tanning industry officials say the focus of government intervention should be on teaching moderation and that it&#39;s unfair to blame salons for overexposure that might lead to cancer, warning that a teen tanning ban would damage business.</p><p>Nick Patel, CEO of Lincolnshire-based L.A. Tan, which has about 65 salons in Illinois, said he has closed a number of locations over the last 18 months and that the new law could mean more lost jobs. Patel said his employees are trained to coach customers to tan wisely.</p><p>&quot;People just need to be educated more than anything else,&quot; he says.</p><p>The Indoor Tanning Association, which represents thousands of salon operators, contests the links between tanning and cancer.</p><p>&quot;Proponents of these laws always exaggerate the risks of exposure to ultraviolet light in order to get the attention of the public, the media and the government,&quot; the ITA said in a May 2012 statement. The group supports parental or guardian consent for those under age 18 who want to tan.</p><p>Illinois law already banned tanning by anyone younger than 14 but had allowed minors between 14 and 17 to tan with parental permission. Salons that violate the rules can be fined $250. Teen tanning already was banned altogether in Chicago and Springfield, and sponsors said the new law will level the playing field for salons across the state.</p><p>Sen. Christine Radogno, a Lemont Republican, said she co-sponsored the bill as a mother of three daughters, one who worked in a salon. She said she hated it when her daughters would tan.</p><p>&quot;We just have to make pale beautiful again,&quot; Radogno said.</p><p>For Moncivaiz, it&#39;s personal.</p><p>&quot;I think the bill will save countless lives,&quot; she said.</p></p> Thu, 15 Aug 2013 13:38:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/sections/lifestyle/illinois-governor-signs-teen-tanning-ban-108428 A father decides to be a different kind of father than his was http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/father-decides-be-different-kind-father-his-was-107790 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/storycorps dave and tom.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>After losing his mother to cancer, David Wartowski is finding his relationship with his father, Tom, even more important.</p><p>Tom has had his own struggles with cancer and depression.</p><p>The pair visited the Chicago StoryCorps booth to remember David&rsquo;s mother, whom they affectionately called Musiu, and to talk about their own relationship.</p><p>Tom: &hellip; My father was very, very strict (crying). He would always criticize what I did, and he thought by calling me lazy and stupid that I would turn out to be industrious and hardworking and smart. But really, it had the counter effect. He pretty much convinced me that I wasn&rsquo;t bright and that I was lazy.</p><p>David: You know, it turned out your relationship with me, with your son, was very little, I think, like the relationship you had with your father.</p><p>Tom: Yeah, there were some things I said I wasn&rsquo;t going to do - corporal punishment my father used a lot. I wasn&rsquo;t going to use that.</p><p>Tom tells his son he struggled with depression, but that his wife, David&rsquo;s mother, changed his life.</p><p>David: You were diagnosed with cancer in..</p><p>Tom: 2001</p><p>David: Shortly after Musiu died of cancer &hellip; I was in my roughly mid-20s thinking I would lose both of my parents without any siblings.</p><p>Listen to the audio above to hear more of David and Tom&rsquo;s story.</p><p><em>Katie Mingle is a producer for WBEZ and the Third Coast Festival.&nbsp;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F6250422" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Fri, 21 Jun 2013 08:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/father-decides-be-different-kind-father-his-was-107790 Is cancer funny? http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-11/cancer-funny-103636 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Scott%20Beale.jpg" title="Tig Notaro (Flickr/ Scott Beale)" /></p><p>Tig Notaro is in great demand in the comedy world. After doing stand up for more than 15 years, she&rsquo;s finally made it to the big time. She&rsquo;s got a new job with Comedy Central and a book deal; her debut album is high on the charts on iTunes, and lots of magazine editors want her in their pages. So, you may ask: &ldquo;What is the secret to Notaro&#39;s sudden success?&rdquo; Well, her answer is an unusual one &mdash; she&rsquo;s got cancer!</p><p>Nataro was diagnosed with cancer earlier this year, and underwent a double mastectomy, chemo-therapy and radiation treatment. This was not long after she contracted a serious bacterial infection, lived through the sudden, unexpected death of her mother, and suffered a bitter break up with her girlfriend. What did she do with this bad luck and medical agony? She made fun of it, by turning it into a stand-up routine:&nbsp;&quot;Good evening. Hello. I have cancer. How are you? Is everybody having a good time?&quot;</p><p>Macabre? Indeed! Shocking? You bet! Cynical? Absolutely! Angry? A little? Funny? Well, yes! After you let it all sink in. Notaro is really not being irreverent. She&rsquo;s not talking about other people&rsquo;s cancer, she&rsquo;s talking about her cancer and trying, through laughter, to take away the fear, dread and stigma of having cancer. Her routine is a bit of &ldquo;gallows humor.&rdquo; It&rsquo;s an attempt to detox her own fears, and perhaps help others to deal with their fears of illness and death.</p><p>Notaro is clearly a student of Joan Rivers, that great American philosopher who once said, &ldquo;If you can laugh at it, you can live with it.&rdquo; Humor prevents us from perceiving reality as a personal attack or a personal affront. Humor is about the ability to transcend self. It&rsquo;s the ability to celebrate our collective experiences and essential sameness. Humor allows us to laugh at our personal and collective vulnerability.</p><p>Humor has to do with transcending the absurdity and fragility of life. Nietzsche suggested that to gaze too long into the &ldquo;gapping abyss&rdquo; leads to despair and futility. Notaro&#39;s work suggests that humor, laughter and joke-telling are a way to gaze into the abyss, confront the unknowable and unanswerable, and perhaps find comfort and perspective: Humor allows us to gaze into the abyss and not be defeated.</p><p>Now Notaro has both gazed into the abyss and descended into it. But she is not defeated. She has survived and is in remission. She is laughing herself well!</p><p><em>Al Gini is a Professor of Business Ethics and Chairman of the Management Department in the Quinlan School of Business at Loyola University Chicago.</em></p></p> Thu, 15 Nov 2012 05:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-11/cancer-funny-103636 Cardinal George ‘fearful’ about cancer but vows to keep working http://www.wbez.org/sections/culture/cardinal-george-%E2%80%98fearful%E2%80%99-about-cancer-vows-keep-working-101958 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/CardinalGeorge2.jpg" style="margin: 4px 0px 0px 0px; float: left; height: 306px; width: 250px; " title="The leader of more than 2 million Chicago-area Catholics expects to hear next week about treatment options. (WBEZ/Chip Mitchell)" />The spiritual leader of more than 2 million Chicago-area Roman Catholics says he is expecting to hear more next week about cancer found in his body and about treatment options.</p><p>Cardinal Francis George on Friday night made his first public appearance since finding out a week earlier that cancerous cells were in his liver and kidney.</p><p>&ldquo;We all live with the Lord as much as possible,&rdquo; he told reporters before attending a fundraiser for his archdiocese&rsquo;s Hispanic ministry. &ldquo;If this is a call to be with him for eternity, then that&rsquo;s a welcome call in that sense. But it&rsquo;s also a fearful call, because there&rsquo;s so much that&rsquo;s unknown.&rdquo;</p><p>George, 75, looked healthy but said medical tests had weakened him. He said Mayo Clinic physicians would help analyze the test results.</p><p>A 2006 cancer battle led to the removal of his bladder, prostate and part of a ureter. &ldquo;I had felt I&rsquo;d licked something and I didn&rsquo;t,&rdquo; the cardinal said. &ldquo;And so that isn&rsquo;t a good feeling.&rdquo;</p><p>George grew up in St. Pascal Parish on Chicago&rsquo;s Northwest Side. He has headed the Chicago archdiocese, which covers Cook and Lake counties, for 15 years. From 2007 to 2010, he was also president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.</p><p>The cardinal said he would keep his public schedule unless treatment affected his immune system. He said he was waiting for more information about his condition before informing Pope Benedict XVI.</p></p> Fri, 24 Aug 2012 21:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/sections/culture/cardinal-george-%E2%80%98fearful%E2%80%99-about-cancer-vows-keep-working-101958