WBEZ | Salsa http://www.wbez.org/tags/salsa Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en University of Illinois attempts to break the record for largest serving of salsa http://www.wbez.org/sections/food/university-illinois-attempts-break-record-largest-serving-salsa-108493 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Salsa.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will attempt to break the world record for the largest serving of salsa on Friday.</p><p>The university aims to prepare more than 7,500 pounds of salsa made from local produce. The dish will include 7,000 pounds of tomatoes, 600 pounds of onions, 20 pounds of jalapeno peppers, 375 bunches of cilantro, and 70 gallons of lime juice.</p><p>The current record holder is Asociación de Productores del Tomates de Los Palacios in Spain, which made 5,868 pounds of salsa on 15 June 2013.</p><p>Associate Director of Housing Kirsten Ruby said the U of I&rsquo;s dining staff will prepare the salsa in the middle of their football stadium.</p><p>&ldquo;What people will see will be a large vessel on the field of Memorial Stadium,&rdquo; &nbsp;Ruby said, &ldquo;The vessel is probably about six feet tall and maybe six or seven feet wide. So when you look at it, you may not think that that is something that will be containing 748,000 calories but that is what it will take to break the record.&rdquo;</p><p>The record attempt is part of a university tradition that dates back to 2011, when organizers prepared the world&rsquo;s largest smoothie for new students. The university broke another record the following year for the most number of people husking corn in one location.</p><p>Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Renee Romano said these events give their students a taste of life at the University of Illinois.</p><p>&ldquo;The students say things to one another, like, what did you do your year?&rdquo; Romano said, &ldquo;We did salsa, or we did shucking corn. It makes them feel a part of a tradition.&rdquo;</p><p>The record attempt is being made in conjunction with the new student convocation. Kirsten Ruby said they expect 8,000 people at the event. The salsa will be weighed on Friday, but students will only be able to taste this tangy part of their university&rsquo;s history the following day.</p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-24936aea-a6f8-d5b7-4bfd-282837d59746"><span style="font-size: 16px; font-family: Arial; font-style: italic; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Lee Jian Chung is a WBEZ arts and culture intern. Follow him </span><a href="https://twitter.com/jclee89" style="text-decoration:none;"><span style="font-size: 16px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(17, 85, 204); font-style: italic; text-decoration: underline; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">@jclee89</span></a><span style="font-size: 16px; font-family: Arial; font-style: italic; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">.</span></span></p></p> Thu, 22 Aug 2013 11:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/sections/food/university-illinois-attempts-break-record-largest-serving-salsa-108493 Chicago jazz drummer Frank Rosaly gets in touch with his Puerto Rican roots http://www.wbez.org/blogs/alison-cuddy/2012-06/chicago-jazz-drummer-frank-rosaly-gets-touch-his-puerto-rican-roots-99857 <p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/RS5850_frank_rosaly_photo_johncrawford1-scr.jpg" style="height: 412px; width: 620px;" title="" /></div><div class="mediaelement-audio"><br /><audio class="mediaelement-formatter-identified-1339001507-0" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/Rosaly%20interview%20V3%20AP%20FINAL.mp3">&nbsp;</audio></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><a href="http://frankrosaly.com">Frank Rosaly</a> is known around Chicago as a phenomenally talented and prolific jazz drummer &ndash;he plays in 26 different music ensembles. Rosaly is best known for playing and composing improvised or avant garde jazz music, with occasional forays into rock and other genres. But in his most recent musical research he&#39;s venturing into entirely new terrain &ndash; his Puerto Rican roots.</p><p style="text-align: left;">Rosaly&#39;s parents are both Puerto Rican, but he grew up in Phoenix, Ariz., where he says he was &quot;Americanized&quot; by his family. He&#39;d visit the island as a child but was shy about not speaking Spanish. When he was 11 his parents divorced and he began spending summers with his father in and around San Juan.</p><p style="text-align: left;">Rosaly&#39;s Puerto Rican explorations will be most fully on display this August, when he performs at the Pritzker Pavilion in Millennium Park, with his new ensemble &iexcl;Todos de Pie!&nbsp;&ndash; part of the Made in Chicago jazz series.</p><p style="text-align: left;">You can catch a glimpse of these efforts every Tuesday night in June at <a href="http://whistlerchicago.com/">The Whistler </a>on Milwaukee Avenue in Logan Square. Rosaly just this week kicked off a month-long residency in the Whistler&#39;s Relax Attack Jazz Series.</p><p style="text-align: left;">Rosaly&#39;s group Bootstrap - bassist Nathan McBride, whirlitzer Jim Baker and saxophonist Mars Williams - will play what he calls &quot;rebel music,&quot; or music that responds in some way to social and political situations. Some of the music will be early Puerto Rican salsa. But they&#39;ll also perform music by Bad Brains and others &ndash; it&#39;s sure to be an interesting mix.</p><p style="text-align: left;">For more on Rosaly&#39;s Puerto Rican roots, check out my interview above.</p><p style="text-align: left;"><em>Bootstrap, Whistler Relax Attack Jazz series Tuesdays at 10, 2421 N. Milwaukee Avenue.</em></p><p style="text-align: left;"><em>&iexcl;Todos de Pie!, August 23, Made in Chicago Jazz series. Millennium Park.</em></p></p> Wed, 06 Jun 2012 11:01:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/alison-cuddy/2012-06/chicago-jazz-drummer-frank-rosaly-gets-touch-his-puerto-rican-roots-99857 Musicians from Puerto Rican Congress reunite for a live performance at WBEZ http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-06-17/musicians-puerto-rican-congress-reunite-live-performance-wbez-87998 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-June/2011-06-17/Numero Group.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><em>A correction has been made to this story.</em></p><p>In the 1950s, Carlos “Caribe” Ruis created a gathering for the Humboldt Park community. The Puerto Rican Congress is a civic organization located on North Ave. in Chicago. In the 1970s Ruiz created a music academy there: An outlet for young, aspiring Puerto Rican musicians.<br> <br> Chicago label <a href="http://www.numerogroup.com/" target="_blank">Numero Group</a> recently collected the music of some bands from that period on the CD <em><a href="http://www.numerogroup.com/catalog_detail.php?uid=01227" target="_blank">Cult Cargo: Salsa Boricua De Chicago</a>.</em><br> <br> Members of two of those bands joined <em>Eight Forty-Eight</em>. David Arroyo was a member of Tipica Leal, and Jimmy Hernandez and Alfie Martinez were members of La Justicia. They were joined by Gene Rodriguez on bass. They’ve played together in numerous bands since those days at the academy, but were together again to perform at WBEZ's West Side Bureau.</p><p><strong>Music performed during our segment with David Arroyo, Jimmy Hernandez, Alfie Martinez, Gene Rodriguez:</strong><br> Dizzy Gillespie &amp; Gil Fuller's "Manteca"<br> Tito Puente's "Que Sera Mi China"</p><p><em>Correction: An earlier version of this story and audio misstated the name of the civic organization created by Carlos "Caribe" Ruis.&nbsp; It is the Puerto Rican Congress.</em></p></p> Fri, 17 Jun 2011 15:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-06-17/musicians-puerto-rican-congress-reunite-live-performance-wbez-87998