WBEZ | water scarcity http://www.wbez.org/tags/water-scarcity Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Report claims Great Lakes states acting slowly on water law http://www.wbez.org/frontandcenter/2011-06-23/report-claims-great-lakes-states-acting-slowly-water-law-88259 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/archives/images/cityroom/amp_100406-wbh-asian-carp_large.png" alt="" /><p><p>A <a href="http://www.nrdc.org/water/greatlakescompact.asp">new report </a>out Thursday claims the Great Lakes states are moving slowly to meet required deadlines under a federal law that governs water use.</p><p>That compact prohibits water from being diverted outside the Great Lakes basin except for a few exceptions. It also protects the Great Lakes ecosystem and conserves water. It’s part of an agreement between the eight Great Lakes states and two Canadian provinces.</p><p>By December 2010, the compact required the states to develop state water conservation and efficiency goals, and commit to promote water conservation measures. The report <em>“Protecting a Shared Future” </em>by the Natural Resources Defense Council claims no state “fully met the milestones,” although Wisconsin was closest.</p><p>“We look at performance to date where simply filing reports by the states have been ignored, completely treated as if it’s irrelevant,” said Henry Henderson, director of the NRDC’s Midwest program in advance of the report’s release.</p><p>“I don’t see the sense of urgency gripping the community,” he said. “I think that’s what happens with natural resources. People think they’re just going to be there. The fact that they are exhaustible and can be deeply harmed by lazy, inattentive exploitation is an illusion that affects our shared future.”</p><p>But Daniel Injerd, who acts as head of the Compact Council as Illinois Governor Quinn’s delegate, said a number of states have passed laws and started water management programs. Most have begun water conservation programs.</p><p>“While certainly you can examine these and say are they enough or could they do more, to me, the big accomplishment is we’re starting,” Injerd said leading up to the release of the report. “Even in these hard economic times, every jurisdiction is making some progress. To me at the end of the day, that’s what is important and what will help protect the resource.”</p><p>The NRDC report noted it was “important to underscore the difficulty in fully assessing each state’s progress.” The report goes on to give the states recommendations.</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 23 Jun 2011 18:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/frontandcenter/2011-06-23/report-claims-great-lakes-states-acting-slowly-water-law-88259 Great Lakes face increasing pressure for water from world, own backyard http://www.wbez.org/frontandcenter/2011-06-21/great-lakes-face-increasing-pressure-water-world-own-backyard-88159 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/frontandcenter/photo/2011-06-21/88159/189786450_e27dfccfb3.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The Great Lakes hold six quadrillion gallons of water. That’s 20 percent of the world’s fresh surface water. As scarcity grows, there’s concern more and more people are eying that water -- it's&nbsp; been likened to death by a thousand straws.</p><p>"We are leaving the century of oil and we are entering the century of water," said author Peter Annin. "And so in the next 100 years and beyond, I really do think it’s going to be all about water. We really don’t know how much pressure will come in the future on the Great Lakes."&nbsp;</p><p>A historic compact designed to protect the Great Lakes against that pressure from diversions was signed into law in 2008.</p><p>Now it's facing its first big test in a thirsty suburb of Milwaukee.</p><p>To get a sense for just how vast the lakes are, and what is at stake, I went out to the shores of Lake Michigan with Joel Brammeier, head of the <a href="http://www.greatlakes.org/">Alliance for the Great Lakes</a>. We saw a tiny corner of Indiana, and then just the blue horizon.</p><p>"It’s pretty dramatic," Brammeier said.</p><div class="inline"><div class="inlineContent"><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/frontandcenter"> <img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-24/FNC_Banner_FINAL.jpg" title="" width="270" height="49"></a></p><ul><li><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/about-front-and-center-%E2%80%93-depth-reporting-great-lakes-87655">About Front and Center – in-depth reporting from the Great Lakes</a></strong></li><li><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/great-lakes-face-increasing-pressure-water-world-own-backyard-88093">Great Lakes face increasing pressure for water from world, own backyard</a></strong></li><li><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/how-likely-fear-west-could-steal-great-lakes-water-88134">How likely is the fear the West could steal Great Lakes water? </a></strong></li><li><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/waukeshas-request-great-lakes-water-complex-first-test-law-88126">Waukesha's request for Great Lakes water is complex first test of law </a></strong></li></ul></div></div><p>"When you stand on the shore of the Great Lakes, you absolutely believe that there’s no way this water could ever all be used up and yet we’ve seen things play out in the Southeast and Southwestern United States where resources that were thought to be inexhaustible eventually found their bottom. We don’t want to get anywhere close to that here in the Great Lakes basin."</p><p>Consider the mighty Colorado River, where so much water’s diverted for irrigation, the river often slows to a trickle by its end.</p><p>That’s why the Great Lakes compact became law. It's part of an agreement between the eight Great Lakes states and two Canadian provinces to decide who gets Great Lakes water. It’s like this invisible international shield that keeps Great Lakes water inside the basin.</p><p>What helped spur the agreement was a fear that Great Lakes water would end up around the world, or out West, filling swimming pools in the desert.</p><p>"To people in the Great Lakes region, suggesting that that water could be transferred to other parts of the continent is like someone suggesting that the Rocky Mountains could be transferred to other parts of the United States," said Peter Annin, the author of “The Great Lakes Water Wars.”</p><p>That fear has a basis in fact. In 1998, Canadian officials OK’d a proposal to let the Nova Group ship tankers of water to Asia.</p><p>"It was seen as the nightmare potential legal precedent because if you can send Great Lakes water to Asia, where can’t you send it?" Annin said.</p><p>Lawmakers realized they had nothing on the books to stop it. After years of negotiations, they announced their agreement. Annin says it did more than just prevent diversions. It contained provisions to conserve water and protect the ecosystem.</p><p>"It wasn’t just copying other compacts in the past," he said. "What this compact was trying to do was recognize the environment had a seat at the table, and that humans weren’t just carving up the water for human’s sake."</p><p>"The compact sets a very high bar for decisions to be made about who gets Great Lakes water and who doesn’t," said Joel Brammeier from the Alliance for the Great Lakes. "If you don’t have strong legal protections in place for Great Lakes water, anybody can come and make a claim and say I want some of that."</p><p>But for now, it’s not Asia or the parched West going after Great Lakes water -- it’s our own suburbs. The compact is getting its first major test in Waukesha, a city just outside the basin. Waukesha is draining down its aquifer. It’s had to build an elaborate system to make its water drinkable.</p><p>Dan Duchniak, the general manager of the <a href="http://www.ci.waukesha.wi.us/waterhome">Waukesha Water Utility</a>, said they have to add a slurry of chemicals here in the well to filter out radium. That's a radioactive element that can increase the risk of bone cancer.</p><p>"As you draw down deeper and deeper in these aquifers, you get to a point where it’s brackish water or higher levels of salt," Duchniak said.</p><p>"Do you have any wells that aren’t a problem?" I asked.</p><p>"No," Duchniak said. "Simple answer? No."</p><p>Under the compact, towns outside the basin aren’t allowed to get Great Lakes water. That’s because the basin is like a giant bathtub, and outside of it, water flows away, so water is lost to the Great Lakes. The compact was designed to keep water in.</p><p>There are a few exceptions. Towns that are right on the basin line or like Waukesha – in a county that is – can apply, but even then it’s a tough process. To get a sense how tough that process is, I went to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Eric Ebersberger showed me Waukesha’s application.&nbsp;</p><p>"Oh, we’ve probably got 8 inches of documentation here," he said.</p><p>"And this isn’t everything?</p><p>"No, it’s not everything," he said. "[The] significance is, it’s the first application for a diversion to a community within a straddling county. So a lot of people see it setting a precedent for future such applications if there are any."</p><p>Waukesha will need approval from all eight Great Lakes governors. From now on, every town that wants to divert Great Lakes water is going to have to go through something like this.</p><p>But does that mean the compact is ironclad? An upcoming <a href="http://www.nrdc.org/">Natural Resources Defense Council</a> report finds some states already missed deadlines for water efficiency and conservation goals. Several environmentalists worried that could put the compact at risk, as water scarcity increases.</p><p>Henry Henderson‘s director of the NRDC’s Midwest Program:</p><p>"Clearly Congresses can undo what they have done," he said. "What becomes vulnerable is having a lackadaisical, tattered and underinvested set of institutions. Things that work right don’t invite reform."</p><p>A law professor at Wayne State University, <a href="http://www.greatlakeslaw.org/blog/about-professor-noah-hall.html">Noah Hall</a>, thought it was "very" unlikely though, that the federal government would tamper with the compact:</p><p>"There are dozens of interstate water compacts," Hall said. "Some have been in existence for almost 100 years. And Congress has never disturbed the settled agreements in any of those compacts."</p><p>And if the states do fall behind, he said, there’s a tried-and-true remedy: lawsuits.</p><p>"You rarely get environmental protection without citizens going to court and enforcing it."</p><p>Citizens can be powerful outside of court, too. When the Nova Group wanted to ship water to Asia, it was public outcry that turned the tide. Either way, along with politicians and advocates, vigilance must also come from citizens who have made their lives on the Great Lakes, like&nbsp; a group of retirees who keep a close eye on Lake Superior.</p><p>"I know everyone is trying to take our water away from us," said one of the men. They gather every morning for coffee near the lake's western border.</p><p>"You’ve got to watch these governors from Michigan and Wisconsin and Illinois and Minnesota," one of the other men said. "Once they get in a group in a room together, a lot of things can happen. They’ll go right through their Congressmen and within two years, you can have water trailing out of here faster than you can make it."</p><p>The compact was designed to prevent that -- even in the face of climate change and exploding population counts -- if everyone does their part or is made to do so in court.</p><p>For more information about the compact or Waukesha's application:</p><p><a href="http://www.cglg.org/">Council of Great Lakes Governors</a></p><p><a href="http://www.greatlakeswaterwars.com/">Peter Annin's The Great Lakes Water Wars</a></p><p><a href="http://dnr.wi.gov/org/water/dwg/WaukeshaDiversionApp.htm">Waukesha's application</a></p><p><a href="http://www.ci.waukesha.wi.us/web/guest/springs_era">Waukesha water history</a></p><p><a href="http://www.cglg.org/projects/water/CompactImplementation.asp#State%20Legislative%20Activity">The compact's legislative history</a></p><p><strong>For an international take on water issues, see Worldviews stories on <a href="http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-07-13/year-later-many-pakistan%E2%80%99s-poorest-flood-victims-refuse-return-home-8909">Pakistan's flood victims</a> and <a href="http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-07-14/north-china%E2%80%99s-south-north-water-diversion-project-world%E2%80%99s-largest-divers">China's water diversion.</a></strong></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 21 Jun 2011 23:07:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/frontandcenter/2011-06-21/great-lakes-face-increasing-pressure-water-world-own-backyard-88159 Waukesha's request for Great Lakes water is complex first test of law http://www.wbez.org/story/waukeshas-request-great-lakes-water-complex-first-test-law-88126 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-June/2011-06-21/waukesha 018.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A law that’s designed to prevent other parts of the country and the world from draining the Great Lakes is getting its first big test in our own backyard.</p><p>The water-use compact is part of an agreement between eight Great Lakes states and two Canadian provinces to figure out who can have Great Lakes water. It prohibits diversions, though it makes a few exceptions, including for communities that straddle the Great Lakes basin or for those that are in counties on that line.</p><p>One of those communities, a suburb of Milwaukee called Waukesha, is asking for Great Lakes water because it has too much radium in its water supply.</p><p>Waukesha Water Utility General Manager Dan Duchniak said the city’s had five well failures in the last year. The aquifer it depends on is getting lower.</p><p>“That water is getting older and older and older, and so the radium concentration levels get higher and higher,” Duchniak said. “As you draw down deeper and deeper in the aquifers, you get to a point where it’s brackish water or higher levels of salt. And so what you’re going to have to do then is remove the salt out of the water because people do not want to have water to have a high salt concentration. It’s not aesthetically pleasing and it’s not good to use.”</p><table style="width: 290px;" align="left" border="0" cellpadding="10" cellspacing="10"><tbody><tr><td><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/frontandcenter"><img alt="" class="caption" src="http://www.wbez.org/sites/default/files/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-21/waterspromo.jpg" style="width: 280px; height: 50px; float: left; margin: 5px;" title=""></a></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/about-front-and-center-%E2%80%93-depth-reporting-great-lakes-87655">About Front and Center – in-depth reporting from the Great Lakes</a></strong></p><p><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/great-lakes-face-increasing-pressure-water-world-own-backyard-88093">Great Lakes face increasing pressure for water from world, own backyard</a></strong></p><p><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/how-likely-fear-west-could-steal-great-lakes-water-88134">How likely is the fear the West could steal Great Lakes water? </a></strong></p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Duchniak said the city is looking to lake water because there are no other good alternatives.&nbsp; He said other water sources aren’t as reliable long-term or would cause more harm to the environment.</p><p>Local environmentalists aren’t convinced.</p><p>Cheryl Nenn, the Milwaukee Riverkeeper, is worried about the impact on Underwood Creek, where Waukesha would return its treated wastewater, as required by the compact. The creek empties into Menominee River, then into the Milwaukee River and finally into Lake Michigan.</p><p>This river already has flooding issues.</p><p>"It can rise by 5 to 6 feet within 15 to 30 minutes,” Nenn said. “It can be pretty scary to be out there right at the beginning of a rain event. It’s pretty dramatic how fast the creek can change.”</p><p>Nenn said the discharge from Waukesha would increase that flooding dramatically. The city proposes to divert its water during the worst storms and make up for the lost water by bringing in water from another system later.&nbsp; Nenn said blending water like that appears to violate the compact and ups the risk of introducing invasive species or disease.</p><p>“We’re certainly worried about any impacts to water quantity that cause a flooding issues for folks downstream, but (we’re) also looking at impacts to water quality not only for fish and critters that live in the stream but for kids who play here in the summer,” Nenn said. “A very high percentage of that river water is going to have treated wastewater in it.”</p><p>Peter Annin, the author of “The Great Lakes Water Wars,” said Waukesha’s solution to this has been described as “Rube Goldberg like.” &nbsp;Getting water under the compact is a complex process by design. Annin said Waukesha’s application is so complicated, it would take at least two trips up the Willis Tower (formerly the Sears Tower) to explain it.</p><p>That’s a concern to some lawmakers, officials and environmental advocates. They said they’d hoped that this first big test would have been, well, a little cleaner, a little less complicated.</p><p>That’s because they’re concerned this case will set precedents that could determine how high – or low – the bar will be set for future diversions from the Great Lakes.</p><p>“By setting the bar too low, by ignoring the fact this is the first big precedent set, would just open the door to a bunch of mediocre, subpar applications around the region,” said lawyer Jodi Habush Sinykin with Midwest Environmental Advocates. “If we have this first application meet a high bar, we can have a far better chance &nbsp;that the rest of the region will follow likewise.”</p><p>To give you an idea just how complicated this application is, consider the fact the city’s own mayor is arguing the city has other alternatives than lake water. He won election partly by arguing against the need for Milwaukee water.</p><p>The rest of the council has pretty much voted to say, hey, no, we don’t have other alternatives. That’s a key requirement under the compact. Waukesha needs to get an OK from all eight Great Lakes governors, and it’s easy to see at least one set of gubernatorial eyebrows wagging over the mayor’s stance.</p><p>One hundred years ago, Waukesha used to have so much water, it bubbled from the ground all over the city. The famous springs fed lavish resorts and one of the nation’s largest bottling companies.</p><p>Duchniak took me to Hobo Springs to show me part of what’s left. Hobo Springs is now just a small stone fountain with a little water and a lot of pennies, like a wishing well.</p><p>“It is kind of ironic that the once water capital of the world is now looking for water and is looking at the Great Lakes as their water supply,” Duchniak said.</p></p> Tue, 21 Jun 2011 17:09:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/waukeshas-request-great-lakes-water-complex-first-test-law-88126 Great Lakes face increasing pressure for water from world, own backyard http://www.wbez.org/story/great-lakes-face-increasing-pressure-water-world-own-backyard-88093 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-June/2011-06-20/waukesha 021.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The Great Lakes hold six quadrillion gallons of water. That’s 20 percent of the world’s fresh surface water. As scarcity grows, there’s concern more and more people are eying that water -- it's&nbsp; been likened to death by a thousand straws.</p><p>"We are leaving the century of oil and we are entering the century of water," said author Peter Annin. "And so in the next 100 years and beyond, I really do think it’s going to be all about water. We really don’t know how much pressure will come in the future on the Great Lakes."&nbsp;</p><p>A historic compact designed to protect the Great Lakes against that pressure from diversions was signed into law in 2008.</p><p>Now it's facing its first big test in a thirsty suburb of Milwaukee.</p><p>To get a sense for just how vast the lakes are, and what is at stake, I went out to the shores of Lake Michigan with Joel Brammeier, head of the <a href="http://www.greatlakes.org/">Alliance for the Great Lakes</a>. We saw a tiny corner of Indiana, and then just the blue horizon.</p><p>"It’s pretty dramatic," Brammeier said.</p><br> <table style="width: 290px;" align="left" border="0" cellpadding="10" cellspacing="10"><tbody><tr><td><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/frontandcenter"><img alt="" class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-21/waterspromo.jpg" style="width: 280px; height: 50px; float: left; margin: 5px;" title=""></a></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/about-front-and-center-%E2%80%93-depth-reporting-great-lakes-87655">About Front and Center – in-depth reporting from the Great Lakes</a></strong></p><p><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/great-lakes-face-increasing-pressure-water-world-own-backyard-88093">Great Lakes face increasing pressure for water from world, own backyard</a></strong></p><p><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/how-likely-fear-west-could-steal-great-lakes-water-88134">How likely is the fear the West could steal Great Lakes water? </a></strong></p><p><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/waukeshas-request-great-lakes-water-complex-first-test-law-88126">Waukesha's request for Great Lakes water is complex first test of law </a></strong></p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>"When you stand on the shore of the Great Lakes, you absolutely believe that there’s no way this water could ever all be used up and yet we’ve seen things play out in the Southeast and Southwestern United States where resources that were thought to be inexhaustible eventually found their bottom. We don’t want to get anywhere close to that here in the Great Lakes basin."</p><p>Consider the mighty Colorado River, where so much water’s diverted for irrigation, the river often slows to a trickle by its end.</p><p>That’s why the Great Lakes compact became law. It's part of an agreement between the eight Great Lakes states and two Canadian provinces to decide who gets Great Lakes water. It’s like this invisible international shield that keeps Great Lakes water inside the basin.</p><p>What helped spur the agreement was a fear that Great Lakes water would end up around the world, or out West, filling swimming pools in the desert.</p><p>"To people in the Great Lakes region, suggesting that that water could be transferred to other parts of the continent is like someone suggesting that the Rocky Mountains could be transferred to other parts of the United States," said Peter Annin, the author of “The Great Lakes Water Wars.”</p><p>That fear has a basis in fact. In 1998, Canadian officials OK’d a proposal to let the Nova Group ship tankers of water to Asia.</p><p>"It was seen as the nightmare potential legal precedent because if you can send Great Lakes water to Asia, where can’t you send it?" Annin said.</p><p>Lawmakers realized they had nothing on the books to stop it. After years of negotiations, they announced their agreement. Annin says it did more than just prevent diversions. It contained provisions to conserve water and protect the ecosystem.</p><p>"It wasn’t just copying other compacts in the past," he said. "What this compact was trying to do was recognize the environment had a seat at the table, and that humans weren’t just carving up the water for human’s sake."</p><p>"The compact sets a very high bar for decisions to be made about who gets Great Lakes water and who doesn’t," said Joel Brammeier from the Alliance for the Great Lakes. "If you don’t have strong legal protections in place for Great Lakes water, anybody can come and make a claim and say I want some of that."</p><p>But for now, it’s not Asia or the parched West going after Great Lakes water -- it’s our own suburbs. The compact is getting its first major test in Waukesha, a city just outside the basin. Waukesha is draining down its aquifer. It’s had to build an elaborate system to make its water drinkable.</p><p>Dan Duchniak, the general manager of the <a href="http://www.ci.waukesha.wi.us/waterhome">Waukesha Water Utility</a>, said they have to add a slurry of chemicals here in the well to filter out radium. That's a radioactive element that can increase the risk of bone cancer.</p><p>"As you draw down deeper and deeper in these aquifers, you get to a point where it’s brackish water or higher levels of salt," Duchniak said.</p><p>"Do you have any wells that aren’t a problem?" I asked.</p><p>"No," Duchniak said. "Simple answer? No."</p><p>Under the compact, towns outside the basin aren’t allowed to get Great Lakes water. That’s because the basin is like a giant bathtub, and outside of it, water flows away, so water is lost to the Great Lakes. The compact was designed to keep water in.</p><p>There are a few exceptions. Towns that are right on the basin line or like Waukesha – in a county that is – can apply, but even then it’s a tough process. To get a sense how tough that process is, I went to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Eric Ebersberger showed me Waukesha’s application.&nbsp;</p><p>"Oh, we’ve probably got 8 inches of documentation here," he said.</p><p>"And this isn’t everything?</p><p>"No, it’s not everything," he said. "[The] significance is, it’s the first application for a diversion to a community within a straddling county. So a lot of people see it setting a precedent for future such applications if there are any."</p><p>Waukesha will need approval from all eight Great Lakes governors. From now on, every town that wants to divert Great Lakes water is going to have to go through something like this.</p><p>But does that mean the compact is ironclad? An upcoming <a href="http://www.nrdc.org/">Natural Resources Defense Council</a> report finds some states already missed deadlines for water efficiency and conservation goals. Several environmentalists worried that could put the compact at risk, as water scarcity increases.</p><p>Henry Henderson‘s director of the NRDC’s Midwest Program:</p><p>"Clearly Congresses can undo what they have done," he said. "What becomes vulnerable is having a lackadaisical, tattered and underinvested set of institutions. Things that work right don’t invite reform."</p><p>A law professor at Wayne State University, <a href="http://www.greatlakeslaw.org/blog/about-professor-noah-hall.html">Noah Hall</a>, thought it was "very" unlikely though, that the federal government would tamper with the compact:</p><p>"There are dozens of interstate water compacts," Hall said. "Some have been in existence for almost 100 years. And Congress has never disturbed the settled agreements in any of those compacts."</p><p>And if the states do fall behind, he said, there’s a tried-and-true remedy: lawsuits.</p><p>"You rarely get environmental protection without citizens going to court and enforcing it."</p><p>Citizens can be powerful outside of court, too. When the Nova Group wanted to ship water to Asia, it was public outcry that turned the tide. Either way, along with politicians and advocates, vigilance must also come from citizens who have made their lives on the Great Lakes, like&nbsp; a group of retirees who keep a close eye on Lake Superior.</p><p>"I know everyone is trying to take our water away from us," said one of the men. They gather every morning for coffee near the lake's western border.</p><p>"You’ve got to watch these governors from Michigan and Wisconsin and Illinois and Minnesota," one of the other men said. "Once they get in a group in a room together, a lot of things can happen. They’ll go right through their Congressmen and within two years, you can have water trailing out of here faster than you can make it."</p><p>The compact was designed to prevent that -- even in the face of climate change and exploding population counts -- if everyone does their part or is made to do so in court.</p><p>For more information about the compact or Waukesha's application:</p><p><a href="http://www.cglg.org/">Council of Great Lakes Governors</a></p><p><a href="http://www.greatlakeswaterwars.com/">Peter Annin's The Great Lakes Water Wars</a></p><p><a href="http://dnr.wi.gov/org/water/dwg/WaukeshaDiversionApp.htm">Waukesha's application</a></p><p><a href="http://www.ci.waukesha.wi.us/web/guest/springs_era">Waukesha water history</a></p><p><a href="http://www.cglg.org/projects/water/CompactImplementation.asp#State%20Legislative%20Activity">The compact's legislative history</a></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 21 Jun 2011 10:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/great-lakes-face-increasing-pressure-water-world-own-backyard-88093