WBEZ | Criminal Justice http://www.wbez.org/news/criminal-justice Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Disbelief by some in Hammond after accused cops are reinstated http://www.wbez.org/news/disbelief-some-hammond-after-accused-cops-are-reinstated-111159 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/hammond_1.png" alt="" /><p><p><em>Updated 11/25/2014 at 4 p.m.</em></p><p>Two Hammond, Indiana police officers involved in a controversial traffic stop that invited comparisons to Ferguson, Missouri are back on patrol after the mayor asserted they were cleared of any wrongdoing by the FBI.</p><p>But now&nbsp;the FBI agent in charge of the investigation, Bob Ramsey, denies that, saying the case is ongoing and the officers have yet to be cleared.</p><div>&quot;At this point, no,&quot; Ramsey said. &quot;The Hammond police department has been very open with us, very cooperative, very forthcoming through this entire process. They have provided us information pertaining to the events that happened on the day of question. However, we are still in the process of gathering additional information and a review is not complete at this point.&quot;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Asked to respond, Hammond Mayor Tom McDermott Jr. is sticking to his guns.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>He says he received a letter on Sunday from another FBI agent that the officers were cleared and it was appropriate to put them back on patrol.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Officers Patrick Vicari and Charles Turner, who are white, were caught on video smashing a window and tasing an unarmed black passenger during an incident that stirred outrage at both the local and national level.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The news of their reinstatement came just hours before a Grand Jury decided not to indict the police officer at the center of events in Ferguson.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;Now that we received the results back from the FBI, I made the decision, we made the decision to place both of these officers back on duty,&rdquo; McDermott. said Monday afternoon. &ldquo;They will be back on duty immediately.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Lavance Turner, a student at Purdue University Calumet in Hammond, was perplexed by the decision.</div><p>&ldquo;I really do believe that was a complete violation of any and everything regarding [the passenger&rsquo;s] personal well being and how they went about it,&rdquo; Turner said.</p><p>He and fellow student Michael Carson reacted to the news while watching the Ferguson Grand Jury announcement on TV in the student center on campus.</p><p>&ldquo;You see that! They&rsquo;re about to riot. No indictment?&rdquo; said the 22-year-old Carson moments after the decision was read by the prosecutor in St. Louis County, Missouri.</p><p>The two students were equally baffled that criminal charges weren&rsquo;t filed against the two Hammond police officers who had been on desk duty the past few weeks.</p><p>The case stemmed from an incident on Sept. 24 when Lisa Mahone, a black motorist was pulled over for not wearing her seatbelt.</p><p>Officers Vicari and Turner stopped Mahone, 27, on 169th Street near Cline Avenue in the city&rsquo;s Hessville neighborhood.</p><p>The officers&rsquo; attention quickly turned to a front seat passenger in the car, 42-year-old Jamal Jones. They ordered him to produce identification and get out of the car. After Jones spent several tense minutes trying to explain he had no I.D. and refusing to exit the vehicle, officers smashed the passenger window, used a taser and arrested Jones.</p><p>Much of the incident was recorded on a cell phone by Mahone&rsquo;s 14-year-old son in the backseat. A young girl also sitting in the rear of the vehicle is heard crying in the video.</p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="465" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/XsW-QCxXkQA?showinfo=0" width="620"></iframe></p><p>The video went viral and Purdue Cal student Lavance Turner says he watched it dozens of times on social media.</p><p>&ldquo;You can&rsquo;t really resist physically if you&rsquo;re in your own car. So, I don&rsquo;t understand if the officer felt threatened. It was really strange,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>A Hammond police spokesman said the officers feared for their safety when one officer said he saw Jones drop his hands behind the center console of the vehicle.</p><p>Mayor McDermott was steadfast in his defense of Officers Turner and Vicari.</p><p>&ldquo;If we condone this type of behavior and make it so that every time a person who is pulled over for a seat belt violation or anything else that it can drag on for 15 or 20 minutes for something as simple as someone handing over an ID,&rdquo; McDermott said.&nbsp; &ldquo;If that&rsquo;s the America that we&rsquo;re heading towards, that&rsquo;s not going to be an ideal place to live.&rdquo;</p><p>Lisa Mahone and Jamal Jones filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the Hammond Police Department.</p><p>Their attorney, Dana Kurtz, says McDermott is part of the problem.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s not just officers engaging in excessive force, it&rsquo;s police departments and, especially in this case, the mayor of the city of Hammond, condoning what these officers did,&rdquo; Kurtz said. &ldquo;That just encourages this kind of conduct to continue.&rdquo;</p><p>McDermott has long rejected the comparisons to Ferguson by pundits. But he says the incident has impressed upon him that he needs to work closer with the city&rsquo;s African-American population.</p><p>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t think there are any winners or losers in this. I can tell you the Mayor of Hammond has heard the frustrations loud and clear,&rdquo; McDermott said.</p><p>The Hammond chapter of the NAACP is pushing the city to hire more African American police officers. Currently, the Hammond Police Department has 9 black officers out of a force of 151.</p><p>Blacks account for 20 percent of Hammond&rsquo;s 80,000 residents.</p><p>&ldquo;The (African-American) numbers in the Hammond Police Department are too low and I&rsquo;m going to fix that,&rdquo; McDermott said.</p><p>Rev. Homer Cobb, head of Hammond&rsquo;s NAACP, said he always had his doubts about whether the FBI actually cleared the officers, and he still thinks the controversial traffic stop could&rsquo;ve been better handled.</p><p>But Cobb adds he appreciates the dialogue that&rsquo;s been established with the mayor and police department since then.</p><p>&ldquo;I wouldn&rsquo;t consider Hammond to be as volatile as Ferguson but there&rsquo;s every bit of a concern all across the nation because we&rsquo;re dealing with profiling and events happening without accountability,&rdquo; Cobb said. &ldquo;What we want is a better Hammond.</p><p><em>Correction: A previous version of this story mistakenly stated that the FBI had cleared the two police officers of any wrongdoing. That was according to Hammond mayor Tom McDermott, Jr. The story has now been updated with direct comment from the FBI.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 25 Nov 2014 12:44:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/disbelief-some-hammond-after-accused-cops-are-reinstated-111159 A look at what's ahead in the Ferguson case http://www.wbez.org/news/criminal-justice/look-whats-ahead-ferguson-case-111156 <p><p>WASHINGTON (AP) &mdash; A St. Louis County grand jury declined Monday to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old in Ferguson, Missouri. The decision resolves one aspect of the case, but additional investigations remain and the community for months has been bracing for demonstrations in anticipation of the grand jury&#39;s decision.</p><p>A look at some of the likely next steps in Ferguson:</p><p>Q. What other investigations are underway?</p><p>A: The FBI and the Justice Department are continuing to investigate the shooting for potential civil rights violations. Investigators would need to satisfy a rigorous standard of proof in order to mount a prosecution. Whereas the county grand jury could consider multiple charges, Justice Department lawyers have a single focus: whether it can be shown that Wilson willfully deprived Brown of his civil rights. That is a difficult burden to meet, especially considering the wide latitude given to police officers in using deadly force. Some other past high-profile police shootings, including the 1999 killing of Amadou Diallo in New York City, did not result in federal prosecutions.</p><p>Q. What about broader allegations of racial insensitivity on the part of the Ferguson police department?</p><p>A: Beyond the shooting itself, the Justice Department is conducting a wide-reaching investigation into the practices of the entire department. That investigation is focusing on stops, searches and arrests and generally looking for patterns of discrimination within the overwhelmingly white department. It has the potential to require major changes in the policing methods of the Ferguson force. Such broader reviews typically rely on data and interviews in the community and can take far longer than a criminal investigation.</p><p>The Justice Department has initiated roughly 20 investigations of troubled police departments in the past five years, or more than twice the number undertaken in the five years before that.</p><p>And regardless of the outcome of the criminal investigation, there&#39;s also the potential that Brown&#39;s family could file a wrongful-death lawsuit against Wilson.</p><p>Q: How long might these other investigations go on?</p><p>A: The Justice Department has not set a timeline for either investigation, though outgoing Attorney General Eric Holder has said he expects the federal investigation into the shooting to be concluded before he leaves office.</p><p>Q: How will authorities deal with any protests?</p><p>A: Holder has appealed for calm among police and protesters and President Barack Obama urged the people of Ferguson &quot;to keep protests peaceful.&quot; Police have been bracing for protests in the community, particularly after the unrest that roiled Ferguson in the weeks after the shooting. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon pre-emptively declared a state of emergency and activated the National Guard in anticipation of potentially raucous protests, with the St. Louis County Police Department placed in charge of security. Gun sales surged before the grand jury decision and some shop owners boarded up their stores.</p><p>A federal law enforcement team has been working with top commanders in Ferguson and from neighboring police departments to help reduce tensions and build trust.</p><p>Q: Are there longer-term efforts to deal with underlying problems?</p><p>A: Nixon several days ago named 16 members to a panel aimed at helping the community heal after the shooting. The commission, which will study underlying social and economic conditions, is expected to make recommendations in a report due by September 2015.</p><p>___</p><p>Follow Eric Tucker on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/etuckerAP</p></p> Mon, 24 Nov 2014 21:48:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/criminal-justice/look-whats-ahead-ferguson-case-111156 Key figures in the Ferguson, Missouri, shooting http://www.wbez.org/news/criminal-justice/key-figures-ferguson-missouri-shooting-111154 <p><p>FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) &mdash; A look at some of the key figures in the case of Michael Brown, the black 18-year-old who was shot and killed by a white police officer in August &mdash; a death that stirred weeks of violent unrest in the St. Louis suburb.</p><p>___</p><p>MICHAEL BROWN</p><p>Michael Brown graduated from Normandy High School last spring and was preparing to attend Vatterott College, where he planned to study to become a heating and air conditioning technician. Friends say he eventually wanted to go into business for himself.</p><p>Relatives and friends described Brown, who grew up in a tough neighborhood, as a quiet, gentle giant who stood around 6-foot-3 and weighed nearly 300 pounds. He was unarmed on the day he was killed.</p><p>Police said later that he was a suspect in the &quot;strong-arm&quot; robbery of a convenience store moments before the shooting. A family attorney said Brown may have made mistakes but did not deserve to die.</p><p>&quot;He was just looking forward to getting on with his life,&quot; said his grandmother, Desuirea Harris. &quot;He was on his way.&quot;</p><p>___</p><p>OFFICER DARREN WILSON</p><p>Some descriptions of Ferguson police Officer Darren Wilson are similar to those of Brown. Both men have been described as gentle and quiet. Police Chief Thomas Jackson said Wilson had no previous complaints against him and a good career record.</p><p>&quot;He&#39;s devastated,&quot; the chief said after naming Wilson as the shooter back in August. &quot;He never intended for this to happen. He is, and has been, an excellent police officer.&quot;</p><p>Wilson began his career in nearby Jennings before moving to the Ferguson job several years ago. He was placed on paid administrative leave after the shooting.</p><p>___</p><p>POLICE CHIEF THOMAS JACKSON</p><p>Thomas Jackson was a police veteran long before he came to Ferguson. He spent more than 30 years with the St. Louis County Police Department, at one point serving as commander of a drug task force. Before that he was a SWAT team supervisor, undercover detective and hostage negotiator.</p><p>He heads a department with 53 officers, only three of them black, in a town where nearly 70 percent of the 21,000 residents are African-American.</p><p>&quot;I&#39;m constantly trying to recruit African-Americans and other minorities,&quot; Jackson has said. &quot;But it&#39;s an uphill battle. The minority makeup of this police department is not where I want it to be.&quot;</p><p>Some of Jackson&#39;s actions in the wake of the shooting have drawn criticism, including his decision to announce that Brown was a suspect in the convenience store robbery, a move that stirred anger in Ferguson&#39;s black community.</p><p>___</p><p>ST. LOUIS COUNTY PROSECUTOR BOB MCCULLOCH</p><p>Since his election in 1991, Bob McCulloch has been the top prosecutor in St. Louis County. A Democrat with a reputation for being tough on crime, he comes from a law enforcement family. He was 12 when his father, a police officer, was shot and killed by a black suspect in 1964.</p><p>Some critics, including St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley, questioned McCulloch&#39;s ability to be objective in the Ferguson case. They wondered if the loss of his father in such circumstances creates a built-in bias.</p><p>___</p><p>MISSOURI STATE HIGHWAY PATROL CAPT. RON JOHNSON</p><p>During a 27-year career, Capt. Ron Johnson rose from patrolman to chief of the 11-county division of the Missouri State Highway Patrol that includes St. Louis and its suburbs.</p><p>Back in August, Gov. Jay Nixon appointed Johnson to take command of security in Ferguson. That decision came after complaints that authorities were too heavy-handed with protesters, when St. Louis County police were in charge.</p><p>Johnson&#39;s calm but commanding presence drew high praise from many observers. When Johnson, who is black, walked down the streets of Ferguson with protesters, many demonstrators shook his hand or posed for photos with him. He reminded locals of his Ferguson roots and suggested that he, too, had lessons to learn from the case.</p><p>&quot;We all ought to be thanking the Browns for Michael, because Michael&#39;s going to make it better for our sons, so they can be better black men,&quot; he said during public remarks in August.</p><p>He also apologized to Brown&#39;s family.</p><p>&quot;I wear this uniform, and I should stand up here and say that I&#39;m sorry,&quot; he said.</p><p>___</p><p>MISSOURI GOV. JAY NIXON</p><p>Events in Ferguson could have a significant effect on the political future of Gov. Jay Nixon, a 58-year-old Democrat.</p><p>His experience in confronting crime includes overseeing Missouri&#39;s long record of executions. During Nixon&#39;s four terms as attorney general and two terms as governor, Missouri has put 66 convicted killers to death, a total few states can match.</p><p>Nixon drew some criticism in the days immediately after the shooting for keeping a low profile, but he soon moved to the forefront, putting state police in charge of security and then calling in the National Guard to help quell the violence.</p><p>___</p><p>ATTORNEY BENJAMIN CRUMP</p><p>Benjamin Crump became a national figure when he represented the family of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teenager fatally shot by a neighborhood-watch organizer in 2012. Now he is back in the spotlight, representing Brown&#39;s family in another racially charged death.</p><p>Crump, 44, was born in North Carolina, one of nine children. Now based in Tallahassee, Florida, he seems to fight back his own emotions as he talks about the loss suffered by Brown&#39;s parents.</p><p>&quot;I don&#39;t want to sugarcoat it,&quot; Crump said in August. Brown &quot;was executed in broad daylight.&quot;</p><p>___</p><p>ATTORNEY GENERAL ERIC HOLDER</p><p>Almost from the outset, Attorney General Eric Holder showed a strong interest in Michael Brown&#39;s death.</p><p>Two days after the shooting, Holder said the case deserved a full review and dispatched a Justice Department team to Ferguson to try to calm tensions. The department soon launched its own civil rights investigation.</p><p>Holder ordered a federal medical examiner to perform a third autopsy on Brown and called the Brown family to express his condolences. He said aggressively pursuing these types of investigations is &quot;critical for preserving trust between law enforcement and the communities they serve.&quot;</p></p> Mon, 24 Nov 2014 15:28:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/criminal-justice/key-figures-ferguson-missouri-shooting-111154 Timeline of events after death of Michael Brown http://www.wbez.org/news/criminal-justice/timeline-events-after-death-michael-brown-111153 <p><p>FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) &mdash; A timeline of key events following the fatal police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson.</p><p>___</p><p>AUG. 9 &mdash; Brown and a companion, both black, are confronted by an officer as they walk back to Brown&#39;s home from a convenience store. Brown and the officer, who is white, are involved in a scuffle, followed by gunshots. Brown dies at the scene, and his body remains in the street for four hours in the summer heat. Neighbors later lash out at authorities, saying they mistreated the body.</p><p>AUG. 10 &mdash; After a candlelight vigil, people protesting Brown&#39;s death smash car windows and carry away armloads of looted goods from stores. In the first of several nights of violence, looters are seen making off with bags of food, toilet paper and alcohol. Some protesters stand atop police cars and taunt officers.</p><p>AUG. 11 &mdash; The FBI opens an investigation into Brown&#39;s death, and two men who said they saw the shooting tell reporters that Brown had his hands raised when the officer approached with his weapon and fired repeatedly. That night, police in riot gear fire tear gas and rubber bullets to try to disperse a crowd.</p><p>AUG. 12 &mdash; Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson cancels plans to release the name of the officer who shot Brown, citing death threats against the police department and City Hall.</p><p>AUG. 14 &mdash; The Missouri Highway Patrol takes control of security in Ferguson, relieving St. Louis County and local police of their law-enforcement authority following four days of violence. The shift in command comes after images from the protests show many officers equipped with military style gear, including armored vehicles, body armor and assault rifles. In scores of photographs that circulate online, officers are seen pointing their weapons at demonstrators.</p><p>AUG. 15 &mdash; Police identify the officer who shot Brown as Darren Wilson, 28. They also release a video purporting to show Brown robbing a convenience store of almost $50 worth of cigars shortly before he was killed, a move that further inflames protesters.</p><p>AUG. 16 &mdash; Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon declares a state of emergency and imposes a curfew in Ferguson.</p><p>AUG. 17&mdash; Attorney General Eric Holder orders a federal medical examiner to perform another autopsy on Brown.</p><p>AUG. 18 &mdash; Nixon calls the National Guard to Ferguson to help restore order and lifts the curfew.</p><p>AUG. 19 &mdash; Nixon says he will not seek the removal of St. Louis County prosecutor Bob McCulloch from the investigation into Brown&#39;s death. Some black leaders questioned whether the prosecutor&#39;s deep family connections to police would affect his ability to be impartial. McCulloch&#39;s father was a police officer who was killed in the line of duty when McCulloch was a child, and he has many relatives who work in law enforcement.</p><p>AUG. 20 &mdash; Holder visits Ferguson to offer assurances about the investigation into Brown&#39;s death and to meet with investigators and Brown&#39;s family. In nearby Clayton, a grand jury begins hearing evidence to determine whether Wilson should be charged.</p><p>AUG. 21 &mdash; Nixon orders the National Guard to begin withdrawing from Ferguson.</p><p>SEPT. 25&mdash; Holder announces his resignation but says he plans to remain in office until his successor is confirmed.</p><p>SEPT. 25&mdash; Ferguson Chief Tom Jackson releases a videotaped apology to Brown&#39;s family and attempts to march in solidarity with protesters, a move that backfires when Ferguson officers scuffle with demonstrators and arrest one person moments after Jackson joins the group.</p><p>OCT. 10 &mdash; Protesters from across the country descend on the St. Louis region for &quot;Ferguson October,&quot; four days of coordinated and spontaneous protests. A weekend march and rally in downtown St. Louis draws several thousand participants.</p><p>OCT. 13 &mdash; Amid a downpour, an interfaith group of clergy cross a police barricade on the final day of Ferguson October as part of an event dubbed &quot;Moral Monday.&quot; The protests extend beyond Ferguson to sites such as the nearby headquarters of Fortune 500 company Emerson Electric and the Edward Jones Dome in downtown St. Louis, site of a Monday Night Football game between the St. Louis Rams and the San Francisco 49ers.</p><p>OCT. 21 &mdash; Nixon pledges to create an independent Ferguson Commission to examine race relations, failing schools and other broader social and economic issues in the aftermath of Brown&#39;s death.</p><p>NOV. 17 &mdash; The Democratic governor declares a state of emergency and activates the National Guard again ahead of a decision from a grand jury. He places the St. Louis County Police Department in charge of security in Ferguson, with orders to work as a unified command with St. Louis city police and the Missouri Highway Patrol.</p><p>NOV. 18 &mdash; Nixon names 16 people to the Ferguson Commission, selecting a diverse group that includes the owner of construction-supply company, two pastors, two attorneys, a university professor, a 20-year-old community activist and a police detective. Nine of its members are black. Seven are white.</p><p>NOV. 24 &mdash; St. Louis County prosecutor&#39;s office says the grand jury has reached a decision.</p></p> Mon, 24 Nov 2014 15:16:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/criminal-justice/timeline-events-after-death-michael-brown-111153 Grand jury: No indictment for Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson http://www.wbez.org/news/grand-jury-no-indictment-ferguson-police-officer-darren-wilson-111152 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP762329691737.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>FERGUSON, Mo. &mdash; A grand jury declined Monday to indict white police officer Darren Wilson in the death of Michael Brown, the unarmed, black 18-year-old whose fatal shooting sparked weeks of sometimes-violent protests and inflamed deep racial tensions between many African-Americans and police.</p><p>Moments after the announcement by St. Louis County&#39;s top prosecutor, crowds began pouring into Ferguson streets to protest the decision. Some taunted police, broke windows and vandalized cars. Within a few hours, several large buildings were ablaze, and frequent gunfire was heard. Officers used tear gas to try to disperse some of the gatherings.</p><p>Prosecuting Attorney Bob McCulloch said the jury of nine whites and three blacks met on 25 separate days over three months, hearing more than 70 hours of testimony from about 60 witnesses, including three medical examiners and experts on blood, toxicology and firearms.</p><p>&quot;They are the only people that have heard and examined every witness and every piece of evidence,&quot; he said, adding that the jurors &quot;poured their hearts and soul into this process.&quot;</p><p>As McCulloch read his statement, Michael Brown&#39;s mother, Lesley McSpadden, sat atop a vehicle listening to a broadcast of the announcement. When she heard the decision, she burst into tears and began screaming before being whisked away by supporters.</p><p>The crowd with her erupted in anger, converging on the barricade where police in riot gear were standing. They pushed down the barricade and began pelting police with objects, including a bullhorn. Officers stood their ground.</p><p>At least nine votes would have been required to indict Wilson. The grand jury met in secret, a standard practice for such proceedings.</p><p>Speaking for nearly 45 minutes, a defensive McCulloch repeatedly cited what he said were inconsistencies and erroneous accounts from witnesses. When asked by a reporter whether any of the accounts amount to perjury, he said, &quot;I think they truly believe that&#39;s what they saw, but they didn&#39;t.&quot;</p><p>The prosecutor also was critical of the media, saying &quot;the most significant challenge&quot; for his office was a &quot;24-hour news cycle and an insatiable appetite for something &mdash; for anything &mdash; to talk about.&quot;</p><p>In his statement, McCulloch never mentioned that Brown was unarmed when he was killed.</p><p>Brown&#39;s family released a statement saying they were &quot;profoundly disappointed&quot; in the decision but asked that the public &quot;channel your frustration in ways that will make a positive change. We need to work together to fix the system that allowed this to happen.&quot;</p><p>Shortly after the announcement, authorities released more than 1,000 pages of grand jury documents, including Wilson&#39;s testimony.</p><p>Wilson told jurors that he initially encountered Brown and a friend walking in a street and, when he told them to move to a sidewalk, Brown responded with an expletive.</p><p>Wilson then noticed that Brown had a handful of cigars, &quot;and that&#39;s when it clicked for me,&quot; he said, referring to a radio report minutes earlier of a robbery at a nearby convenience store.</p><p>Wilson said he asked a dispatcher to send additional police, then backed his vehicle up in front of Brown and his friend. As he tried to open the door, Wilson said Brown slammed it back shut.</p><p>The officer said he then pushed Brown with the door and Brown hit him in the face. Wilson told grand jurors he was thinking: &quot;What do I do not to get beaten inside my car.&quot;</p><p>&quot;I drew my gun,&quot; Wilson told the grand jury. &quot;I said, &quot;Get back or I&#39;m going to shoot you.&quot;</p><p>&quot;He immediately grabs my gun and says, &quot;You are too much of a pussy to shoot me,&quot; Wilson told grand jurors. He said Brown grabbed the gun with his right hand, twisted it and &quot;digs it into my hip.&quot;</p><p>Asked why he felt the need to pull his gun, Wilson told grand jurors he was concerned another punch to his face could &quot;knock me out or worse.&quot;</p><p>After shots were fired in the vehicle, Brown fled, and Wilson gave chase. At some point, Brown turned around to face the officer.</p><p>Witness accounts were conflicted about whether Brown walked, stumbled or charged back toward Wilson before he was fatally wounded, McCulloch said. There were also differing accounts of how or whether Brown&#39;s hands were raised. His body fell about 153 feet from Wilson&#39;s vehicle.</p><p>Thousands of people rallied in other U.S. cities, including Los Angeles and New York, to protest Monday&#39;s decision, leading marches, waving signs and shouting chants of &quot;Hands Up! Don&#39;t Shoot,&quot; the slogan that has become a rallying cry in protests over police killings across the country.</p><p>President Barack Obama appealed for calm and understanding, pleading with both protesters and police to show restraint.</p><p>&quot;We are a nation built on the rule of law, so we need to accept that this decision was the grand jury&#39;s to make,&quot; Obama said. He said it was understandable that some Americans would be &quot;deeply disappointed &mdash; even angered,&quot; but echoed Brown&#39;s parents in calling for any protests to be peaceful.</p><p>Monday night&#39;s violence initially resembled the unrest during the days that followed Brown&#39;s death, when business windows were smashed and police vehicles damaged. But the destruction soon widened, with several large fires burning out of control and reports of frequent gunfire.</p><p>At least 10 St. Louis-bound flights were diverted to other airports because of concern about gunfire being aimed into the sky over Ferguson. Only law-enforcement aircraft were permitted to fly through the area, the Federal Aviation Administration said.</p><p>The Justice Department is conducting a separate investigation into possible civil rights violations that could result in federal charges, but investigators would need to satisfy a rigorous standard of proof in order to mount a prosecution. The department also has launched a broad probe into the Ferguson Police Department, looking for patterns of discrimination.</p><p>Regardless of the outcome of those investigations, Brown&#39;s family could also file a wrongful-death lawsuit against Wilson.</p><p>The Aug. 9 shooting heightened tensions in the predominantly black St. Louis suburb that is patrolled by an overwhelmingly white police force. As Brown&#39;s body lay for hours in the center of a residential street, an angry crowd of onlookers gathered. Rioting and looting occurred the following night, and police responded with armored vehicles and tear gas.</p><p>Protests continued for weeks &mdash; often peacefully, but sometimes turning violent, with demonstrators throwing rocks and Molotov cocktails and police firing smoke canisters, tear gas and rubber bullets. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon briefly summoned the National Guard.</p><p>Throughout the investigation, some black leaders and Brown&#39;s parents questioned McCulloch&#39;s ability to be impartial. The prosecutor&#39;s father, mother, brother, uncle and cousin all worked for the St. Louis Police Department, and his father was killed while responding to a call involving a black suspect in 1964.</p><p>McCulloch was 12 at the time, and the killing became a hallmark of his initial campaign for elected prosecutor.</p><p>A Democrat, McCulloch has been in office since 1991 and was re-elected to another term earlier this month.</p><p>___</p><p>Link to grand jury documents</p><p>___</p><p>Associated Press writers Alan Scher Zagier in Clayton, Andale Gross and Jim Suhr in Ferguson and Catherine Lucey in Des Moines, Iowa, contributed to this report.</p><p>Chicago reaction to Ferguson verdict -</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/chicago-reacts-to-ferguson-grand-jury-decision/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/chicago-reacts-to-ferguson-grand-jury-decision.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/chicago-reacts-to-ferguson-grand-jury-decision" target="_blank">View the story "Chicago reacts to Ferguson grand jury decision" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 24 Nov 2014 14:14:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/grand-jury-no-indictment-ferguson-police-officer-darren-wilson-111152 Alderman says police overtime is main reason he voted against mayor's budget http://www.wbez.org/news/alderman-says-police-overtime-main-reason-he-voted-against-mayors-budget-111140 <p><div>Just four out of 50 aldermen voted not to approve Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s $7.3 billion budget for next year. 32nd Ward Ald. Scott Waguespack said the main reason he voted against it was unanswered questions about the Chicago Police Department&rsquo;s portion of the pie. More specifically, the department&rsquo;s growing overtime costs&mdash;and the lack of information on the expense.<p>Waguespack said over the last couple of years, he and other members of the self-titled Progressive Caucus repeatedly have asked both the budget office and the police department for more information on police overtime. And, during budget hearings last month, Waguespack directly asked Supt. Garry McCarthy for a month-by-month breakdown of overtime costs. The superintendent and budget committee chair agreed it was a request the police department could fulfill&mdash;but it didn&rsquo;t.</p>&ldquo;What we&rsquo;re just gonna vote yes, even though we don&rsquo;t know about $100 million worth of budgeting and specifics on it? That is unacceptable,&rdquo; Waguespack said. &ldquo;We actually have to vote on it, which really puts us in a horrible position.&rdquo;<p>Waguespack said he didn&rsquo;t receive anything from CPD or the city budget office on the issue before he cast his vote Wednesday. Waguespack also said he and others were mocked by fellow aldermen for asking about hiring more officers in lieu of spending millions on overtime. Other members of the council echoed the superintendent&rsquo;s stance that it would cost more to employ additional officers.</p>&ldquo;I found that pretty offensive,&rdquo; Waugespack said, &ldquo;especially when the police department superintendent himself could not provide details about how his budget worked from month to month.&rdquo;<p>Waguespack believes the lack of transparency on the subject shows that the police department is &ldquo;out of control&rdquo; in the way it&rsquo;s budgeting for overtime. In 2013, CPD budgeted $32 million for overtime but wound up spending over $100 million. This year&rsquo;s projected expense is $95 - $100 million, more than $20 million over what was budgeted.</p><p>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t think they&rsquo;re providing evidence to the people of the city that shows they should be allowed to continue doing this,&rdquo; Waguespack said, adding that it&rsquo;s bad policy to carry on this way.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/chart.PNG" style="height: 172px; width: 620px;" title="" /></div></div><p>Waguespack was part of a group that last year supported an amendment to spend $25 million to hire 500 new cops to deal with violent crimes&mdash;but the plan was blocked in committee. Fellow Progressive Caucus member Ald. John Arena (45th) voted for that amendment too.&nbsp; He pointed out the trend to overspend on overtime during budget hearings last month&mdash;and asked Supt. Garry McCarthy if [the proposed] $71 million was going to be sufficient for next year?</p><p>&ldquo;You know what, alderman, I can&rsquo;t answer that...I really can&rsquo;t,&rdquo; McCarthy said. &ldquo;I can&rsquo;t answer that next year we&rsquo;re going to do that much better. We&rsquo;re trying to knock it down. We&#39;re putting systems in place to do that, and slowly but surely I anticipate we&#39;re going to bring it under control.&rdquo;</p><p>WBEZ pressed the police department for an explanation as to why Waguespack&rsquo;s request was not fulfilled before the budget was called for a vote. CPD spokesman Martin Maloney wrote in a statement that the CPD receives numerous information request during the budget process. And that &ldquo;if any of these responses have not yet made it to the inquiring aldermen, they will be delivered soon.&rdquo; &nbsp;</p><p><em>Katie O&#39;Brien is a WBEZ reporter and producer. Follow her <a href="http://twitter.com/katieobez" target="_blank">@katieobez</a>.</em></p></p> Thu, 20 Nov 2014 18:09:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/alderman-says-police-overtime-main-reason-he-voted-against-mayors-budget-111140 Siblings detained in Islamic State case http://www.wbez.org/news/siblings-detained-islamic-state-case-111053 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/isis.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A young Bolingbrook man accused of trying to leave the U.S. to join ISIS allegedly brought two younger siblings with him, federal prosecutors said during a hearing Monday.</p><p>Hamzah Khan, 19, was detained with a brother and sister at O&rsquo;Hare International Airport in early October. He&rsquo;s charged with attempting to provide material support to a terrorist group. His brother and sister, who were 16 and 17 at the time, have not been charged nor have their names been released.</p><p>Assistant U.S. Attorney Matt Hiller said Khan and his siblings were trying to fly to Vienna, and then to Turkey, where they allegedly planned to sneak into Syria to join ISIS.</p><p>&quot;He tried to take his high school-aged siblings halfway around the world to a war zone,&quot; Hiller said, portraying Khan as the main instigator of the plan.</p><p>He told the judge that Khan had a &ldquo;sophisticated&rdquo; plan to get himself and his siblings to ISIS. Khan allegedly planned the journey for months, including getting a job at a retail store and a credit card to raise money to purchase plane tickets costing nearly $2,700 for himself and his siblings. He also allegedly applied for their passport renewals and visas.</p><p>At the detention hearing Monday, a federal judge ruled that Khan could not be released on bond because he poses a flight risk and is a potential danger to the community.</p><p>The court arguments and exhibits released by both prosecutors and the defense Monday offered a first glimpse into details of the case.</p><p>Hiller said letters, notebooks and other evidence found in the Khan home made it clear that the siblings planned to engage in violence if they got to Syria. The siblings wrote and doodled about ISIS on school notes and an academic calendar, too.</p><p>They &quot;not only had barbaric rhetoric ... they tried to carry it out,&quot; Hiller said.</p><p>All three children left letters for their parents that offer a window into the minds of other young people like them who are allegedly fleeing the U.S. to join ISIS and other terror groups.</p><p>Khan&rsquo;s sister wrote to her parents that her heart was &ldquo;crying with the thought that I left you and that I will probably never see you again &hellip;&rdquo;</p><p>They all begged their parents not to call the police. Prosecutors said Monday the parents didn&rsquo;t know about the activities. In fact, Hiller said, when agents arrived to search the home, the mother thought at least one of the kids was upstairs sleeping and led agents to the bedroom, to find it empty.</p><p>In their letters, the kids wrote of watching Muslims being killed overseas, of not wanting their tax money to fund these military actions, of disenchantment and even disgust with the values of the Western world.</p><p>They wrote, too, that they believe there&rsquo;s an obligation for Muslims to join ISIS now that the group has a self-declared Islamic state, or caliphate.</p><p>Hamzah Khan said he couldn&rsquo;t live under a system in which he couldn&rsquo;t speak about jihad or other beliefs.</p><p>&ldquo;Me living in comfort with my family while my other family are getting killed is plain selfish of me,&quot; he wrote, adding he didn&rsquo;t want his future children raised &ldquo;in a filthy environment like this. We are all witness that the Western societies are getting more immoral day by day.&rdquo;</p><p>In another notebook entry, one of his siblings allegedly writes that when talk of Jihad came up, men turned away and said, &lsquo;&ldquo;The time has not come yet, our elders are not doing it, if the scholars have not said it, who are you to? It is pointless, Islam does not preach violence &hellip; I swear by the one who holds my soul in his hands, I will not give this up even if the entire world turns against me.&rsquo;&rdquo; That sibling allegedly used the Twitter handle @DeathIsVNear.</p><p>Hiller called the writings &ldquo;a far cry from misguided youth with overzealous religious beliefs.&quot;</p><p>But defense attorney Tom Durkin argued the opposite. He said prosecutors don&#39;t have the evidence to prove Hamzah Khan actually sought to provide material support to militants from the so-called Islamic State.</p><p>Durkin said there was an &ldquo;enormous amount of evidence&rdquo; Khan wanted to go live in a caliphate, and considered it a religious obligation, but that act alone was not a crime. He said there wasn&rsquo;t &ldquo;clear cut evidence&rdquo; Khan wanted to fight with ISIS.</p><p>He said Hamzah Khan was being accused of a &ldquo;thought crime,&rdquo; and that the government was trying to use statements of religious belief to infer Khan was dangerous.</p><p>He described Khan as a devout, sensitive, thoughtful kid committed to his faith. He said Khan and young people like him are being &ldquo;brainwashed&rdquo; by slick marketing and social media campaigns by ISIS into believing they need to join or otherwise be un-Islamic.</p><p>Durkin was sharply critical of U.S. policy to charge young people who are trying to join ISIS with criminal acts, rather than trying to deprogram them and correct &ldquo;misguided&rdquo; thoughts and information, as some other countries have done.</p><p>He said Khan is now wishing he hadn&rsquo;t decided to go.</p><p>Last Friday, the judge denied the government&rsquo;s request to partially close Monday&#39;s detention hearing. Federal prosecutors had argued the need to protect the identity of two minors who they intended to bring up at the hearing. Durkin heralded the judge&#39;s decision.</p><p>Khan is charged with seeking to provide material support to a foreign terrorist group, which carries a maximum 15-year prison sentence.</p></p> Mon, 03 Nov 2014 16:41:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/siblings-detained-islamic-state-case-111053 Aldermen skip chance to ask about city's handling of police commander http://www.wbez.org/news/aldermen-skip-chance-ask-about-citys-handling-police-commander-111016 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Scott Ando HORIZONTAL.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The Chicago City Council on Wednesday heard testimony from the head of the city agency that investigates police-brutality complaints. But the aldermen skipped the&nbsp;chance to ask him about the city&rsquo;s handling of a police commander who faces felony charges in a case that began with one of those complaints.</p><p>The occasion was the annual Independent Police Review Authority budget hearing. IPRA Chief Administrator Scott Ando (see photo) testified about a reduction in a&nbsp;backlog of open investigations and about new community outreach. Ando said the most important new outreach vehicles are IPRA&rsquo;s first two satellite offices, one on the West Side and another coming soon on the South Side.</p><p>The few aldermen who spoke at the hearing congratulated Ando. &ldquo;You&rsquo;re doing more with less,&rdquo; Ald. Matthew O&rsquo;Shea (19th Ward) said.</p><p>More notable was what did not come up. Aldermen asked no questions about IPRA&rsquo;s performance investigating fatal shootings by Chicago officers or about the number of excessive-force complaints the agency has sustained.</p><p>And they did not ask about Glenn Evans, the embattled commander, who allegedly rammed his service pistol down an arrested man&rsquo;s throat last year. In April, a test showed the arrestee&rsquo;s DNA on the gun. The test led Ando to recommend that police Supt. Garry McCarthy strip Evans of his police powers, pending the investigation&rsquo;s outcome. WBEZ revealed the case in July.</p><p>Despite IPRA&#39;s recomendation, McCarthy, backed by Mayor Rahm Emanuel, continued to publicly support Evans. They left him in command of the Harrison District until the criminal charges August 27.</p><p>Outside the hearing, Ald. Howard Brookins Jr. (21st) said the Emanuel administration&rsquo;s handling of Evans &ldquo;sends a signal to the community that things have not changed since the Burge era,&rdquo; referring to former Chicago police Cmdr. Jon Burge, implicated in the torture of dozens of African-American men.</p><p>&ldquo;This behavior appears to be a systemic problem in the police department,&rdquo; Brookins said. &ldquo;The superintendent of police and all of the authorities have to show that this conduct will no longer be tolerated. And until there are outward expressions and actions to back that up, it is going to be hard to get away from that impression of the community just by opening a few satellite offices.&rdquo;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/cmitchell-0">Chip Mitchell</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s West Side bureau reporter. Follow him on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/ChipMitchell1">@ChipMitchell1</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>, and connect with him through <a href="https://www.facebook.com/chipmitchell1">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://plus.google.com/111079509307132701769" rel="me">Google+</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/in/ChipMitchell1">LinkedIn</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 29 Oct 2014 19:16:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/aldermen-skip-chance-ask-about-citys-handling-police-commander-111016 Ex-felon informs formerly incarcerated of right to vote http://www.wbez.org/news/ex-felon-informs-formerly-incarcerated-right-vote-110994 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Ex-Felon2.png" style="height: 210px; width: 280px; float: left; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" title="FORCE members and ex-offenders Marlon Chamberlain and Teleza Rodgers meet at a McDonald’s on the city’s west side. They work to notify ex-felons of the right to vote. (WBEZ/Yolanda Perdomo)" />In a back corner at a Chicago McDonald&rsquo;s, Marlon Chamberlain sits and goes through papers under a movie poster. It&rsquo;s from the film &ldquo;The Hurricane&rdquo; the true story of Rubin &ldquo;Hurricane&rdquo; Carter, the famed boxer turned prisoner right&rsquo;s activist.</p><p>There, Chamberlain meets those recently incarcerated who want a new start. Chamberlain is with FORCE, or Fighting to Overcome Records and Create Equality. Chamberlin&rsquo;s job is to talk to ex-prisoners about everything from how to get a job to how to become a community leader. Part of his work includes talking about his past. Specifically the events leading up to September 2002.</p><p>&ldquo;I have a federal offense. I was arrested with conspiracy with intent to distribute and sentenced to 240 months,&rdquo; says Chamberlain. &ldquo;With the Fair Sentencing Act, I ended up serving 10 and a half years.&rdquo;</p><p>He was in federal prison when Barack Obama was elected president in 2008. Chamberlain remembered watching the event and cheering along while the other inmates. But even then, the political process that moved Obama to the presidency was something Chamberlain didn&rsquo;t care much about.</p><p>&ldquo;I didn&rsquo;t believe voting mattered. I didn&rsquo;t see how things could be different or how the mayor or certain state representative could change things in my community. That connection wasn&rsquo;t there.&rdquo;</p><p>After his release, a FORCE member talked to Chamberlain at a halfway house. That&rsquo;s when he started to understand that local lawmakers and not the president decide whether money gets allocated to ex-offender programs and how sentencing guidelines are outlined.</p><p>Chamberlain also learned that ex-felons could vote. In several states, if you&rsquo;re convicted of a felony, you lose the right to vote. Permanently. But in Illinois, an ex-offender can vote upon release. Chamberlain didn&rsquo;t know that. He says lots of people with records don&rsquo;t know that either. Which is why now he&rsquo;s working overtime to get the word out before election day.</p><p>Tucked away between a dead end road and railroad tracks on the city&rsquo;s southwest side, Chamberlain meets with a group of men from the Chicagoland Prison Outreach. They&rsquo;re in a work study program and Chamberlain visits with them on Thursdays. It&rsquo;s part classroom, part bible study and part welding work study. Chamberlain starts the discussion by asking &lsquo;When was the last time anyone voted?&rsquo;</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Ex-Felon1.png" title="Marlon Chamberlain talks to a group from the Chicagoland Prison Outreach about the importance of voting (WBEZ/Yolanda Perdomo)" /></p><p>One person pipes up and says he voted while in jail. He too was told he couldn&rsquo;t vote, but while in the Cook County Jail, inmates awaiting trial can vote. They&rsquo;re given applications for absentee ballots. This year, the Board of Elections processed tens of thousands of new applications. Many inmate applications are rejected, mainly because addresses can&rsquo;t be verified. Out of the more than 9,500 inmates requesting ballots, around 1,300 were deemed eligible.</p><p>A person who goes by the name of Kris says even though he can vote, he&rsquo;s not interested.</p><p>&ldquo;I never cared who was in office,&rdquo; says Kris, &ldquo;I wouldn&rsquo;t even know who to vote for.&rdquo;</p><p>The class tells him he needs to do some homework to know the candidates&rsquo; platforms. Chamberlain echoes the notion of doing a little homework and cautions the class about political stereotypes. Like that all African Americans vote the Democratic ticket.</p><p>&ldquo;Because you got Democrats who won&rsquo;t do nothing. I don&rsquo;t believe in befriending politicians. You know, no permanent friends, no permanent enemies,&rdquo; says Chamberlain. He points to the very room they sit in as a result of some kind<br />of political action.</p><p>&ldquo;So what would happen if people don&rsquo;t vote for the elected official who signed off on this? Then this program goes away,&rdquo; Chamberlain notes. Kris does not care.</p><p>&ldquo;All I see is a lot of squad cars coming around. Our neighborhood, how it was in the past, it was better than how it is now,&rdquo; says Kris. &ldquo; At least we had stuff we could do. We didn&rsquo;t have to stand on the block to have fun. We actually had places.&rdquo; Chamberlain asks Kris if he&rsquo;s ever spoken to his alderman about the problems he sees. Kris shrugs, admitting he&rsquo;s never bothered to make contact. &ldquo;The city is so fou-fou right now. The city ain&rsquo;t right.&rdquo;</p><p>While most people heard a person complaining about problems, Chamberlain heard someone much like himself. A person aware of problems, who knows things could be better. Back at the McDonalds, Chamberlain meets up with FORCE worker Teleza Rodgers. She too, is an ex-felon and covers the city&rsquo;s North Lawndale neighborhood. They talk about how hard it is to get ex-felons motivated to vote. Especially since many of them live the misconception that their voting rights were taken away from them when they went to prison.</p><p>&ldquo;People who don&rsquo;t know us are making decisions about our lives or livelihoods and our neighborhoods. They don&rsquo;t live where we live at,&rdquo; says Rodgers. &ldquo;They (ex-felons)<br />tend to have an ear to that. I say we can&rsquo;t expect to have anyone do anything for us if we&rsquo;re not doing it.&rdquo;</p><p>Rodgers says there&rsquo;s no way around the impact of voter representation. And that several questions on November&rsquo;s ballot can directly impact ex-felons and others in Chicago. Like whether the state should increase funding for mental-health services, whether a school-funding formula for disadvantaged children should be reset, and whether to increase the minimum wage.<br />&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 27 Oct 2014 10:03:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/ex-felon-informs-formerly-incarcerated-right-vote-110994 Prosecutors want more of indicted police commander's 'bad acts' in court http://www.wbez.org/news/prosecutors-want-more-indicted-police-commanders-bad-acts-court-110987 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/glen_evans8 SQUARE.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><br />Cook County prosecutors on Thursday told a judge they would try to bring other &ldquo;crimes and bad acts&rdquo; into a felony case against a Chicago police commander.</p><p>Glenn Evans, photographed on his way out of the hearing by Charlie Billups for WBEZ, allegedly jammed his gun into an arrested man&rsquo;s mouth last year, pressed a taser to his crotch and threatened his life. Last month Evans pleaded not guilty to nine counts of aggravated battery and official misconduct.</p><p>During his 28 years in the police department, Evans has drawn at least 52 brutality complaints. Two led to 15-day suspensions from duty. Six others have led to federal lawsuits that the city paid to settle.</p><p>Evans&rsquo; attorney, Laura Morask, calls that history irrelevant. She says what matters are the allegations in the case&rsquo;s indictment, which focuses on the incident last year.</p><p>The commander, meanwhile, is trying to find out how a DNA report in the case went public. Morask is demanding records from WBEZ and the Independent Police Review Authority, one of several government entities that had the report. At the hearing, Morask said the records would show bias on the part of the case&rsquo;s investigators.</p><p>The judge, Rosemary Grant Higgins, pushed back. She said she would hear more from all sides but warned, &ldquo;It&rsquo;s not this court&rsquo;s job to plug leaks or interfere with the press.&rdquo;</p><p>From our West Side bureau, WBEZ&#39;s Chip Mitchell joined the&nbsp;&ldquo;Afternoon Shift&rdquo;&nbsp;with this update (click the photo above). For background, see all <a href="http://www.wbez.org/tags/glenn-evans">our coverage about the Evans case</a>.</p></p> Fri, 24 Oct 2014 09:16:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/prosecutors-want-more-indicted-police-commanders-bad-acts-court-110987