WBEZ | NATO summit http://www.wbez.org/tags/nato-summit Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en NATO protest fizzles in final hours http://www.wbez.org/news/nato-protest-fizzles-final-hours-99407 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/RS5835_IMG_0750-scr.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>NATO summit protests ended slowly but peacefully in downtown Chicago Monday evening near Grant Park.&nbsp;In the summit&rsquo;s final hours, protesters moved away from international issues to focus on domestic ones, primarily immigration.</p><p>It marked perhaps for the first time since protest began last week that protesters found a common theme.&nbsp;Monday&rsquo;s protest kicked off in the morning near the headquarters of Boeing.&nbsp;It moved midday outside the campaign headquarters for President Barack Obama at the Prudential Building near Randolph and Michigan.</p><p>Police put the crowd at 300 to 400 people. &nbsp;</p><p>Protesters spent much of the afternoon chanting, dancing and overall held a peaceful demonstration. Around 3:30 p.m., protesters began their march through the streets of the South Loop, snarling traffic and chanting various slogans.</p><p>Marchers paused for several minutes at the Congress Hotel on Michigan Avenue and shouted support to striking union hotel workers.&nbsp;Eventually, protesters made their way outside the offices of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, to protest deportations of illegal immigrants and the proposed building of a detention center in far south suburban Crete.</p><p>Dozens of Chicago police, some riding bikes, some wearing riot gear, surrounded the marchers, but allowed them to move on without incident.&nbsp;The march ended at Michigan and Congress with more speeches about NATO and police brutality.</p><p>One person shouted, &ldquo;The police brutality I witness yesterday (Sunday), was the worst police brutality I had ever experienced. Don&rsquo;t let them get away with it!&rdquo;</p><p>Earlier in the day, police Superintendent Garry McCarthy scoffed at such reports that some of his offices exercised brutality Sunday night following a march at 22<sup>nd</sup> and Cermak.</p><p>&quot;Quite frankly, I think that the department did an amazing job in showing the restraint and professionalism that we expect from officers,&quot; McCarthy said.</p><p>In all, McCarthy said, his officers made about 90 arrests of protesters over the last few days. By comparison, he said, Pittsburgh police arrested more than 140 when the G-8 summit met there a few years ago.</p><p>When asked why he chose to be so visible during the summit, often standing side-by-side with his officers in tense situation, McCarthy said he had no choice.</p><p>&ldquo;At the end of the day, I&rsquo;m a police officer. I&rsquo;m out here with the guys and gals on the line and enjoying it. And, at the same time, if I&rsquo;m responsible for what&rsquo;s happening, I have to lead from the front. I can&rsquo;t behind closed doors saying &lsquo;Oh my god, what&rsquo;s going on,&#39;&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m privileged to be here is what it boils down to.&rdquo;</p></p> Mon, 21 May 2012 22:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/nato-protest-fizzles-final-hours-99407 Chicago, capital of the world http://www.wbez.org/blogs/john-r-schmidt/2012-05/chicago-capital-world-99195 <p><p>The just-concluding NATO summit reminded me of a story I&rsquo;d come across in an old copy of the <em>Tribune</em>. The date was December 6, 1945. On that date, Chicago was in the running to become the headquarters of the brand-new United Nations.</p><p>Let&rsquo;s go back and revisit that time.</p><p>The League of Nations had been unable to prevent World War II. That war had lasted nearly six years and cost tens of millions of lives. The UN was supposed to be an improved replacement for the old League.</p><p>For now, the UN was meeting in London.&nbsp;Most member countries favored putting the permanent headquarters in the United States. But where?&nbsp;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/05-21--Chicago%20UN%20delegation_0.jpg" title="Off to London! Mayor Kelly says good-bye to the delegation who will offer Chicago as permanent UN headquarters. (Author's collection)" /></div></div></div></div><p>Among the sites being considered were Boston, Philadelphia, San Francisco, New York City, Westchester County (New York)&ndash;and Chicago. So a four-man delegation from Chicago traveled to London to meet with UN officials. Before boarding their plane for the trip home, they talked with reporters.</p><p>The Chicagoans were upbeat. Getting the UN headquarters for the city appeared to be a done deal. &ldquo;We are more convinced than ever that Chicago meets every requirement,&rdquo; said Corporation Counsel Barnet Hodes.</p><p>The war had been over less than six months, and much of Europe was still devastated and poor.&nbsp;UN officials were frankly worried about the high cost of living in the United States.&nbsp;That was one area where Chicago had an advantage over other American sites.</p><p>&ldquo;We impressed on these people that they can get more for their money in Chicago,&rdquo; labor leader William McFetridge said.&nbsp;Housing, food, recreation, and education were cheaper than in any of the other cities.&nbsp;Foreign diplomats could live very well in the Windy City.</p><p>The Chicago delegation had another reason to be optimistic about landing the prize.&nbsp;The city had its own &ldquo;inside man&rdquo; at the UN.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/05-21--Stevenson%20%28LofC%29.jpg" style="float: left; height: 389px; width: 300px;" title="Adlai Stevenson: US Ambassador to the UN, 1961-1965 (Library of Congress)" /></div><p>Adlai Stevenson, an up-and-coming Chicago lawyer, was then serving in London as deputy U.S. delegate to the UN.&nbsp;Stevenson wanted to get into politics. Helping make Chicago the Capital of the World would also help young Adlai&rsquo;s career.</p><p>If the UN did come to Chicago, where exactly would it be located?&nbsp;Rumors were already circulating that the site would be Northerly Island. That would be close to downtown, yet separated from the mainland for security purposes. Build an airstrip there, and the delegates could fly in!</p><p>As we all know, Chicago never did become the UN headquarters. But after the experience of the last few weeks, maybe that&rsquo;s just as well.</p></p> Mon, 21 May 2012 07:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/john-r-schmidt/2012-05/chicago-capital-world-99195 NATO doesn't deter tourists from Chicago http://www.wbez.org/news/nato-doesnt-deter-tourists-chicago-99325 <p><p>Some tourists visiting Chicago this weekend say the NATO summit didn&#39;t deter them from their planned vacations. WBEZ went out to Michigan Ave. Saturday to talk to tourists about how the summit was affecting their trip.</p><p>Mary Pope from San Diego said she and her husband only found out about the NATO summit on Thursday, so they couldn&#39;t move their trip.</p><p>&quot;Everybody kept sending us emails saying, &#39;Do you realize what&#39;s going on Chicago?&#39; And we&#39;re like, &#39;Oh well, it will add to the fun,&#39;&quot; Pope said.</p><p>Judy and Joe Rahrig are in town from Michigan celebrating their 45th wedding anniversary, and that can&#39;t really be rescheduled.</p><p>&quot;I bought the Jersey Boy tickets so we really kinda had to come,&quot; Judy Rahrig said.</p><p>Her husband Joe said the couple wasn&#39;t worried about being in any danger during their stay in Chicago.</p><p>&quot;They&#39;ve really built up the security, you see it on every corner, you see it on every corner, you see it on all the waterways, as well as the highways,&quot; he said.</p><p>Many say they actually felt safer in the city because of the event. Toronto native Ljiljani Vojanovicilic said if there are any interruptions, the police can handle it.</p><p>&quot;Chicago is a big city, right, so if Chicago can&#39;t handle it, who can, right?&quot; she said.</p></p> Sat, 19 May 2012 17:55:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/nato-doesnt-deter-tourists-chicago-99325 How the NATO peoples helped settle Chicago, Part 3 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/john-r-schmidt/2012-05/how-nato-peoples-helped-settle-chicago-part-3-99036 <p><p>Today we conclude our capsule look at how peoples from the 28 NATO countries helped build Chicago.</p><p><strong>Belgium</strong>—As early as 1854, the government of Belgium identified 83 Belgians as living in the city of Chicago. What there was of a Belgian neighborhood in the city later developed in the few blocks around St. John Berchmans Catholic Church in Logan Square. Since the 1960s that concentration has dispersed.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Hungary-St.%20Stephen%20King_0.JPG" title="St. Stephen of Hungary Catholic Church--2015 W. Augusta Blvd."></div></div><p><strong>Germany—</strong>Germans were the first ethnic group to come to Chicago in great numbers. In 1850 one-sixth of the city’s population carried the “born in Germany” label. By 1900 a full 25% of Chicagoans were either first- or second-generation German.</p><p>They settled on the North Side and up the Lincoln Avenue corridor. They built churches, schools, social halls. They printed books and newspapers, and organized political clubs. They were determined to keep their culture. When one nativist mayor closed the saloons on Sunday, the city’s Germans rioted.</p><p>Then came World War I, and a national wave of anti-Germanism. The local Germans became more assimilated. Today, the Dank Haus in Lincoln Square serves as the city’s German-American cultural center. And along with the Irish and the Poles, Germans remain one of Chicago’s largest European ethnic groups. (Hey—those three are my ancestry!) &nbsp;</p><p><strong>Hungary</strong>—In 1890 there were fewer than 2,000 Hungarians living in Chicago. Within 30 years, that number had swelled to over 70,000. Most of the immigrants took up residence on the South Side, notably in the Burnside neighborhood. There were also Hungarian colonies in East Chicago and Joliet, and in the city around Humboldt Park. Today there is no single concentration of Hungarian settlement.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Germany-Altgeld%20%28State%20of%20Illinois%20photo%29.jpg" style="float: right; width: 300px;" title="A German immigrant to Chicago: John Peter Altgeld (State of Illinois photo)"></div><p><strong>Lithuania</strong>—As anyone who read <em>The Jungle </em>knows, many Chicago Lithuanians lived in the Back of the Yards neighborhood, while working in the Stock Yards itself. The community gradually moved southwest, while struggling to keep its ethnic identity during the years of Soviet incorporation. In the Marquette Park area, a section of 69<sup>th</sup> Street was renamed Lithuanian Plaza Court. About 80,000 people of Lithuanian background now live in Chicagoland. &nbsp;</p><p><strong>Luxembourg</strong>—People from Luxembourg were living on the North Side as early as the 1840s. Within a few decades, a major settlement became established along Ridge Avenue, near St. Henry Catholic Church. A Luxembourger community also sprang up in Niles Center (Skokie). Today about 150,000 Luxembourgers live in various parts of the city and suburbs.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Turkey-TACA.JPG" title="Turkish American Cultural Alliance--3845 N. Harlem Ave."></div><p><strong>Slovakia</strong>—Though there have been Slovaks in Chicago for over 150 years, their numbers can’t be determined with much precision, since Slovakia did not become fully independent until 1993. For much of the 20<sup>th</sup> Century, the major concentration of Slovaks was in the Back of the Yards neighborhood, with another settlement in Joliet. The more recent arrivals have gravitated to Garfield Ridge.</p><p><strong>Slovenia</strong>—Slovenia was first part of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire, and later became a founding state of Yugoslavia, so tracing Chicago’s Slovenians is not always easy. The earliest local colonies were on the Lower West Side and in Joliet. Community life centered around the Catholic parish, though there was also a large secular element. Today there is a Slovenian Cultural Center in suburban Lemont.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-US-American%20Indian%20Center.JPG" title="American Indian Center of Chicago--1630 W. Wilson Ave."></div><p><strong>Turkey</strong>—Chicago’s Turkish population has always been small and dispersed. The Turkish American Cultural Alliance, located in the Dunning neighborhood, has worked to promote art, history, and Turkish heritage.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p><strong>United States</strong>—Before the Europeans came, the largest Native group in current Chicago was the Potawatomi. The tribes were forced to cede their lands during the 1830s, though a few families remained. Since World War II there has been a significant migration from the reservations to urban areas. Today the American Indian Center serves the 40,000 people from nearly 100 tribes living in the Chicago area.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 17 May 2012 07:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/john-r-schmidt/2012-05/how-nato-peoples-helped-settle-chicago-part-3-99036 How the NATO peoples helped settle Chicago, Part 2 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/john-r-schmidt/2012-05/how-nato-peoples-helped-settle-chicago-part-2-99028 <p><p>Today we continue the capsule stories of how people from the 28 NATO countries helped build Chicago. The final part will be posted tomorrow.</p><p><strong>Albania</strong>—Chicago has never had a large Albanian population, and no real Albanian neighborhoods. The most prominent local person of Albanian ancestry was probably comedian John Belushi, who grew up in Wheaton.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Albania-St.%20Nicholas.JPG" title="St. Nicholas Albanian Orthodox Church--2701 N. Narragansett Ave."></div><p><strong>Croatia</strong>—Because Croatia didn’t become independent until 1991, Chicago’s Croatians were commonly classified as “Yugoslavians.” Most of the local community life was centered around a few parishes, such as St. Jerome’s in Armour Square. Mayor Michael Bilandic and Alderman Ed Vrdolyak are the city’s most famous Croatians.</p><p><strong>Denmark</strong>—Most of the Chicago’s earliest Danish immigrants settled along the axis of Milwaukee Avenue, close to other Scandinavians. By 1910 there were nearly 20,000 Danes in the city, the majority of them located near North Avenue in Humboldt Park. From there the newer generations moved northwest and gradually dispersed.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Denmark-Danish%20Home.jpg" title="The Danish Home--5656 N. Newcastle Ave."></div><p><strong>Greece</strong>—Greeks began arriving in the city as early as 1840. By the turn of the 20<sup>th</sup> Century, a thriving community called the Delta was established around the area of Harrison and Halsted. Unlike most other ethnic groups, a large percentage of Greek immigrants remained in America only long enough to make their fortune, then returned to their native land. But enough of them stayed to make Chicago’s Greek settlement one of the country’s biggest.</p><p>Today over 100,000 people of Greek descent live in metro Chicago. During the 1960s, the new University of Illinois campus displaced many residents, and the Greek community dispersed to such areas as Lincoln Square. However, a remnant of the city’s historic Greektown remains on the Near West Side, along Halsted just north of the university. &nbsp;</p><p><strong>Iceland</strong>—In all the years I’ve been in Chicago, I’ve only known one person of Icelandic descent. It was the early 1970s, and she lived near Diversey and Central—which you might say made Cragin the city’s Icelandic neighborhood. If there are any more Icelanders out there, let me know.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Norway-Rockne%20%28LofC%29.jpg" style="float: right; height: 339px; width: 250px;" title="A Norwegian immigrant to Chicago: Knute Rockne (Library of Congress)"></div><p><strong>Norway</strong>—Norwegians were among the earliest immigrants to put down roots in Chicago. They lived along Milwaukee Avenue, mainly in Logan Square. By 1900 there were over 40,000 Norwegians in Chicago, including future football legend Knute Rockne. Though the community is no longer concentrated in one area, a Norwegian Constitution Day Parade is staged annually in Park Ridge.</p><p><strong>Poland</strong>—Chicago’s first wave of Polish immigrants started arriving in the 1850s. They settled on the near Northwest Side. St. Stanislaus Kostka parish was founded in 1864, and as more people came, other churches were built. Business, cultural, and political organizations sprang up. The area near Milwaukee and Division became known as Polish Downtown.</p><p>During the 20<sup>th</sup> century, Poles began moving up Milwaukee Avenue toward Niles. Meanwhile, Polish enclaves developed in Back of the Yards, South Chicago, Hegewisch, and other areas. The Poles became the city’s largest ethnic group, and Chicago was said to be "the second biggest Polish city in the world."</p><p>Today the Chicago area counts about 1.5 million people of Polish ancestry. The community has dispersed, though many Poles still live along the Milwaukee Avenue corridor. The Polish Museum of America is located near the onetime Polish Downtown.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Poland-family%20group%2C%201907.jpg" title="Polish family group, 1907. (Author's collection)"></div><p><strong>Portugal</strong>—Portugal sent an official delegation to the 1893 Columbian Exposition. Yet as late as 1940 there were only 47 Portuguese residents in all of Cook County. The current metro population is said to be about 3,000.</p><p><strong>Spain</strong>—Though Chicago’s Hispanic community is large, the number of ethnic Spaniards has always been very small. The latest estimate puts the number of Spaniards in the Chicago metro area at about 500.</p></p> Wed, 16 May 2012 07:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/john-r-schmidt/2012-05/how-nato-peoples-helped-settle-chicago-part-2-99028 How the NATO peoples helped settle Chicago, Part 1 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/john-r-schmidt/2012-05/how-nato-peoples-helped-settle-chicago-part-1-99022 <p><p>How about something on the impending NATO summit that's free of controversy? For the next three days, I’ll be doing capsule summaries of how the peoples from the 28 countries each did their part to build Chicago. &nbsp;</p><p><strong>Bulgaria</strong>—The first Bulgarians settled in Chicago during the first years of the 20<sup>th</sup> Century. Their numbers were not great, though distinct enclaves developed in Lincoln Square and Albany Park. Immigration has increased in the last 20 years and some sources claim that over 100,000 Bulgarians currently live in metro Chicago.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Bulgaria-Church.JPG" title="St. John of Rila Bulgarian Orthodox Church--5944 W. Cullom Ave."></div></div><p><strong>Canada</strong>—In 1880, Canadians were Chicago’s third-largest immigrant group, after the Germans and the Irish. Most of them were English-speaking and could easily assimilate into the local culture. Today there are probably a lot of Chicagoans with a Canadian background, but you’d never know it—unless you ask one of them to say “about.”</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Czech-Cermak%20%28LofC%29.jpg" style="float: left;" title="A Czech immingrant to Chicago: Anton Cermak (Library of Congress)"></div><p><strong>Czech Republic</strong>—Czechs were commonly referred to as Bohemians in the earliest census reports. Their homeland was then ruled by foreign powers. In the 1870s, large numbers of Czechs began coming to Chicago.</p><p>Most of the immigrants settled on the Lower West Side, along the axis of 18<sup>th</sup> Street. The neighborhood became known as Pilsen, after a city in Bohemia. The more prosperous Czechs later moved west into South Lawndale and suburban Cicero and Berwyn.</p><p>Anton Cermak was the Czech prototype of the poor immigrant who made good. He entered politics, got rich, became Mayor of Chicago, and had a major street named after him. Though almost all Chicagoland’s 500,000 Czechs now live in the suburbs, the old 18<sup>th</sup> Street area is still known as Pilsen.</p><p><strong>Estonia</strong>—Because their homeland was ruled by their bigger neighbors, early Estonian immigrants were classified as Russian or German. Independence came in 1991 with the collapse of the Soviet Union. Estonian House, in Lake County, serves as a cultural center for Chicago’s Estonian-Americans.</p><p><strong>France</strong>—The first European to reside in Chicago, Fr. Jacques Marquette, was French. Chicago’s founder, Jean Baptiste Pointe Du Sable, was half-French. And yet, the city has never had a significant French colony. Why not? There’s a likely subject for a doctoral dissertation here.</p><p><strong>Italy</strong>—A few Italians began coming to Chicago as early as the 1850s. The great wave of immigration began in the 1880s. Over the next four decades the Italians established a significant presence in the city.</p><p>The main Italian community was on the Near West Side, along the Taylor Street corridor. Smaller settlements developed on the Near North Side, in North Austin, and in Pullman. During this era Mother Frances Xavier Cabrini helped establish a school, two hospitals, and other social agencies among her people.</p><p>The second half of the 20<sup>th</sup> Century saw many Italians leaving the city and moving into suburbs such as Elmwood Park and Oakbrook. In 2012 about 500,000 people in metro Chicago claim Italian ancestry. The historic focus of the community remains Taylor Street’s Little Italy, now home to the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame. And don’t forget the Columbus Day Parade!&nbsp;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Italy-street%201903%20%28LofC%29.jpg" title="Italians on the Near North Side, 1903 (Library of Congress)"></div><p><strong>Latvia</strong>—Latvia is a small country, and Chicago never had a large number of Latvians. The 1990 census counted about 7,000 in the metro area. Independence came the next year, and many Latvians have returned to their homeland.</p><p><strong>Netherlands</strong>—The most obvious reminder of Dutch settlement in metro Chicago is suburban South Holland, founded by immigrant farmers from the Netherlands in 1846. The more urban Dutch people later established an enclave just to the north, in the Roseland neighborhood. The Dutch community is now largely assimilated and dispersed.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Romania-Queen%20Marie%2C%201926%20%28CDN%29.jpg" title="Chicago Romanians greet Queen Marie of Romania, 1926 (Chicago Daily News)"></div><p><strong>Romania</strong>—The earliest of the city’s Romanian settlements were on the North Side, in Lakeview and in Edgewater. As with other immigrant groups, many activities revolved around the ethnic parish. Immigration to America has increased in the last two decades, and the Chicago area now has an estimated 100,000 people of Romanian ancestry.</p><p><strong>United Kingdom</strong>—So who are we talking about here? English? Scots? Welsh? Ulster Irish? None of these peoples lived in distinctive ethnic neighborhoods, but all helped build our city. And I’m writing this—and you’re reading it—in English.</p></p> Tue, 15 May 2012 07:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/john-r-schmidt/2012-05/how-nato-peoples-helped-settle-chicago-part-1-99022 For NATO protesters, a welcome mat http://www.wbez.org/news/nato-protesters-welcome-mat-99136 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/LorraineChavez4cropscale.jpg" style="margin: 4px 0px 0px; float: left; width: 356px; height: 223px;" title="Lorraine Chavez is hosting protesters in her McKinley Park home: ‘If we did not have wars, we could have investments for jobs.’ (WBEZ/Chip Mitchell)" /></div><p><em>With Chicago&rsquo;s NATO summit just days away, officials are battening down the hatches for protests that could draw thousands from out of town. But some other Chicagoans are rolling out a welcome mat for those same protesters. They&rsquo;re clearing space in their businesses and churches, allowing tents in their yards, even opening spare bedrooms. We report from our West Side bureau.</em></p><p>Officials are planning to close streets and highways. They&rsquo;re bringing in state police officers and National Guardsmen and preparing for mass arrests. They&rsquo;re ready to roll out a military device that sends ear-piercing tones over long distances. But over in Chicago&rsquo;s McKinley Park neighborhood, there is Lorraine Chavez.</p><p>CHAVEZ: And here is another bedroom if someone has an inflatable mattress. My kids are off to college so I have some empty space.</p><p>Chavez is offering two rooms of her cramped century-old house to some protesters from Florida this weekend.</p><p>MITCHELL: What do you know about these guests?</p><p>CHAVEZ: Not much [laughs] but I requested older guests.</p><p>Chavez says she is taking them in because the protest could bring some attention to joblessness in this country.</p><p>CHAVEZ: I am underemployed myself, despite having a master&rsquo;s, a career path, and doctoral work at the University of Chicago. All of the men in my family who are responsible for college-age kids have all been laid off. If we did not have wars, we could have investments for jobs. This is the moment that these demands are being made and heard and I need to be a part of it.</p><p>Chavez got connected to the Floridians through Occupy Chicago. That group is using its website to collect lodging offers and requests for the NATO protests. A group called CANG8 has a similar site.</p><p>HUNT: If somebody has 20 dogs and someone&rsquo;s allergic to dogs, that would be a bad match.</p><p>Pat Hunt&rsquo;s helping run that system.</p><p>HUNT: If they&rsquo;re providing a warehouse space for 50 to 100 people, they&rsquo;ve asked us to have somebody there just to make sure that [there will be] no drugs, no alcohol, no weapons -- basically that type of thing.</p><p>The anti-NATO groups say they have fielded offers from about 265 potential hosts. They include a homeowner who is installing a wheelchair ramp for a disabled protester. A Latino nonprofit group is taking in guests as long as they don&rsquo;t draw police back to the neighborhood, which is full of undocumented immigrants. A man in DuPage County is letting protesters camp around a house he is losing to foreclosure. An African-American congregation is offering its yard for tents.</p><p>MARSHALL: It was almost a no-brainer for us. It was just a matter of, really, logistics and trying to work out the logistics for it.</p><p>John Marshall serves on the board of that church, Trinity Episcopal. It&rsquo;s just a few blocks from McCormick Place, the site of the NATO summit. He says hosting protesters is not exactly a stand against the military alliance.</p><p>MARSHALL: It&rsquo;s the residue of what happens with war, what happens to refugees, what happens to people who are made poor because of war. Even if they&rsquo;re not within the theater of war, there are lots of people who are poor in the world that we could be helping as opposed to making another B-1 bomber.</p><p>Trinity officials say there hasn&rsquo;t been much fallout for taking that stand but they are hearing from some neighbors. When the church held an educational forum about NATO, some nearby homeowners showed up with questions about the campers.</p><p>NEIGHBOR: How are you going to keep your guests on your property and not coming onto the property of other people who live in the neighborhood?</p><p>MARSHALL: We&rsquo;re going to monitor them. And they&rsquo;re going to be outside at their own Porta-Potties and provide their own stuff.</p><p>Someone peeing in a neighbor&rsquo;s yard isn&rsquo;t the worst thing that could happen. Pat Hunt, the protester who is running one of the housing websites, says what worries her is theft or any sort of attack.</p><p>HUNT: Either one of the guests takes advantage of the host or a host takes advantage of one of the guests. Somebody would get hurt. That&rsquo;s always my fear.</p><p>Hunt says these logistical considerations go beyond this protest against NATO. She says her movement has to start creating the sort of world it&rsquo;s demanding.</p><p>HUNT: If what we&rsquo;re saying is shared resources then we have to model shared resources.</p><p>Hunt thinks this model can work. And, this weekend, we might see if she&rsquo;s right.</p></p> Tue, 15 May 2012 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/nato-protesters-welcome-mat-99136 Worldview 4.26.12 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-04-26/worldview-42612-98571 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/IRAQACTORS10457.sJPG_900_540_0_95_1_50_50.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Turkey is working to block official attempts by Israel to attend the NATO summit. Chicago-area businessman and Turkey scholar <a href="http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/boards/dic/members/celebi.asp" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Mehmet Celebi</a> tells <em>Worldview</em> what’s behind the diplomatic tensions. Also, in Iraqi Kurdistan, a student Shakespeare troupe is becoming internationally recognized for performing the Bard’s plays in their original tongue. <em>Worldview</em> speaks with troupe director Peter Friedrich and actor Ahmad Muhammad Taha about Shakespeare’s role in Iraq. And Rob Cahill teamed up with Chicago bird conservationists to protect the winter home of birds that migrate through Chicago by reforesting a section of a Guatemalan cloud forest. Rob tells <em>Worldview</em> about his group, <a href="http://www.cloudforestconservation.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Community Cloud Forest Conservation</a>.</p></p> Thu, 26 Apr 2012 14:16:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-04-26/worldview-42612-98571 Ahead of NATO summit in Chicago, Turkey looks to thwart Israel’s attendance http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-04-26/segment/ahead-nato-summit-chicago-turkey-looks-thwart-israel%E2%80%99s-attendance-98586 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Flotilla_Gaza_pic_1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The United States wants to see the best possible relationship between Turkey and Israel. But tensions left&nbsp; after Israel&#39;s 2010 raid on a Turkish flotilla are stifling any friendly banter. A series of news reports have said Turkey is attempting to veto any Israeli participation in next month&rsquo;s NATO summit in Chicago. <em>Worldview </em>talks with Chicago-area businessman and Turkey scholar <a href="http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/boards/dic/members/celebi.asp" target="_blank">Mehmet Chelabi</a> aboutTurkey&#39;s growing influence in Middle East politics.</p></p> Thu, 26 Apr 2012 14:08:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-04-26/segment/ahead-nato-summit-chicago-turkey-looks-thwart-israel%E2%80%99s-attendance-98586 Jackson backs anti-NATO march: ‘Our agenda will be heard’ http://www.wbez.org/news/jackson-backs-anti-nato-march-%E2%80%98our-agenda-will-be-heard%E2%80%99-98116 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/JesseJacksonCROPPEDSCALED_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Organizers of a protest march during next month’s NATO summit in Chicago are adding a powerful voice to their ranks. Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr., is backing the walk to McCormick Place, a convention center where some 50 heads of state will hold their two-day meeting.</p><p>“Our world has become jilted by war, too much concentrated wealth and too much poverty,” said Jackson, an internationally known civil-rights activist and a two-time candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination. “I’m hoping on May 20 there will be a large demonstration. And, if it’s nonviolent and disciplined and focused, our agenda will be heard.”</p><p>In this five-minute interview, I ask Jackson how he could march against NATO after supporting its 1999 bombing campaign against Serbian forces. I also ask whether the protest could damage President Barack Obama’s international standing or his reelection bid. The interview begins with Jackson’s take on the march’s significance.</p></p> Tue, 10 Apr 2012 18:13:15 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/jackson-backs-anti-nato-march-%E2%80%98our-agenda-will-be-heard%E2%80%99-98116