WBEZ | Chicago Housing Authority http://www.wbez.org/tags/chicago-housing-authority Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Morning Shift: July 29, 2015 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-29/morning-shift-july-29-2015-112508 <p><p>The Chicago City Council meets and a group of aldermen is expected to re-introduce an ordinance that aims to bring some reform to the Chicago Housing Authority. Our coverage of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act continues with a conversation about how students with disabilities seem to be disciplined at a higher rate than their peers and what that means for their education. We get a visit from our resident Soul Diva Ayana Contreras. The Reclaimed Soul host brings of the music of Chicago artist McKinley Mitchell.</p></p> Wed, 29 Jul 2015 13:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-29/morning-shift-july-29-2015-112508 CHA ordinance comes in front of city council again http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-29/cha-ordinance-comes-front-city-council-again-112507 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/housing Steve Browne &amp; John Verkleir.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A group of alderman plan to re-introduce an ordinance known as &ldquo;Keeping the Promise.&rdquo; It would give more than 12,000 additional families in Chicago access to affordable housing as well as strengthen the Council&rsquo;s oversight of how the Chicago Housing Authority spends its money. Here to discuss the ordinance are organizer J.L. Gross, who&rsquo;s stepped out of the City Hall press conference kicking off now to talk with us, and WBEZ Southside Bureau Reporter Natalie Moore, who joins in studio.</p></p> Wed, 29 Jul 2015 13:33:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-29/cha-ordinance-comes-front-city-council-again-112507 Morning Shift: The Skin You Live In http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-06-09/morning-shift-skin-you-live-112158 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/The-Skin-You-Live-in-Tyler-Michael-.jpg" title="Photo Courtesy of Pinterest" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/209539449&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Blackhawks come home to fight for the cup</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The Blackhawks head back to the &ldquo;Madhouse on Madison&rdquo; after splitting the first two games of the Stanley Cup Finals in Tampa. WBEZ sports contributor Cheryl Raye Stout brings us all the icy action she&rsquo;ll be viewing from the press box and the locker room this week, starting with a 3-2 loss, Monday night.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/Crayestout">Cheryl Raye Stout</a> is WBEZ&#39;s sports contributor.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/209539446&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Safety on The 606</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The 606 officially opened on Saturday for residents to walk the path alongside a parade, music and vendors. But a shooting early Sunday morning has some area residents asking about safety concerns. What is the city doing to ensure riders and pedestrians are safe on trail? Chicago Fire Dept. Assistant Deputy Chief Paramedic Julie Coy was out there Monday and she details some of the concerns.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em>Julie Coy is&nbsp;</em><em><a href="https://twitter.com/CFDMedia">Chicago Fire Dept</a>. Assistant Deputy Chief Paramedic.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/209539443&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">What are the most pressing issues for CHA residents?</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The Chicago Housing Authority has announced its fourth CEO in as many years. The shift in leadership comes two years after Mayor Rahm Emanuel launched &ldquo;Plan Forward: Communities That Work,&rdquo; an update to former Mayor Richard M. Daley&rsquo;s 1999 overhaul of public housing in Chicago known as the &ldquo;Plan for Transformation.&rdquo; We check in with public housing residents on whether the CHA has delivered on the promises made during the Daley and Emanuel administrations. We also get their perspective on incoming <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/emanuel-nominates-new-housing-authority-ceo-112153">CEO Eugene Jones Jr.</a></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em>Francine Washington is the chairwoman of the <a href="http://tellingourstory.org/">Chicago Central Advisory Council.</a></em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pub/tamiko-holt/3a/9bb/6b4">Tamiko Holt</a> is a member of the <a href="http://www.thecha.org/residents/housing-choice-voucher-hcv-program/">CHA Housing Choice Voucher Resident Participant Council.</a></em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/209539439&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">The Skin You Live In</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">When Michael Tyler&rsquo;s son came to him with a story of schoolyard bullying, he knew this would require more than the standard &ldquo;keep your chin up&rdquo; advice. His son had been confronted with a racial epithet and Tyler wanted an illustrative way to explain why that&rsquo;s never appropriate behavior-from anyone. But most children&rsquo;s literature he read that talked about skin color wasn&rsquo;t hitting the mark for him. So Tyler wrote his own book. The Skin You Live In is 10 years old this year, and the author says it&rsquo;s re-emerging as an important option for parents and teachers to pass on the lessons of diversity, self-esteem and race. Tyler details why he thinks the message is different, but even more necessary than ever.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/tsyli">Michael Tyler</a> is author of the book, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/The-Skin-You-Live-In/dp/0975958003">&quot;The Skin You Live In.&quot;</a></em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/209539437&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Stop. Reset.</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Acclaimed Goodman Theatre Artistic Associate Regina Taylor directs her mind-bending, provocative new play about advancing technology&rsquo;s impact on modern society. The rise of e-books and digital technologies may soon force Chicago businessman Alex Ames to shut down his long-standing African American book publishing company. While his employees fret over losing their jobs, Alex finds unlikely inspiration from a mysterious teenager, whose inventive, forward-thinking ideas may provide the solution to preserving Alex&#39;s legacy. <a href="http://reginataylor.com/">Regina Taylor</a> discusses <a href="http://www.goodmantheatre.org/stopreset">Stop. Reset</a>. It runs through June 21 at the <a href="https://twitter.com/GoodmanTheatre">Goodman Theatre.</a></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/TheReginaTaylor">Regina Taylor</a> is a playwright.&nbsp;</em></p></p> Tue, 09 Jun 2015 08:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-06-09/morning-shift-skin-you-live-112158 Morning Shift: Englewood youth baseball http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-06-08/morning-shift-englewood-youth-baseball-112151 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/PMillera4.jpg" style="height: 398px; width: 600px;" title="Flickr/PMillera4" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/209374764&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">New CHA head announced</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Chicago Housing Authority CEO Michael Merchant has stepped down. In his place, Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced the nomination of a veteran public housing leader with recent experience in Detroit - Eugene Jones Jr. WBEZ&rsquo;s Natalie Moore joins us from our South Side Bureau with <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/emanuel-nominates-new-housing-authority-ceo-112153">details.</a></p></div><p><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;"><a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Natalie Moore</a> is WBEZ&#39;s South Side bureau reporter.&nbsp;</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/209374761&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Principal training</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">One week ago, former Chicago Public Schools CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett resigned in the wake of a Federal investigation looking into her involvement with <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-schools-chief-resigns-amid-federal-probe-112114">SUPES Academy</a>. The investigation followed the Board of Education awarding SUPES a $20.5 million no-bid contract to provide training for school principals. What exactly constitutes &quot;principal training,&quot; and how do principals work day-to-day to put various initiatives into practice in their schools? What works and what doesn&#39;t in terms of what makes a principal, well, successful? Clarice Barry, President of Chicago Principals and Administrators Association and a Principal for over 20 years, and Tyson Kane, founding Principal at Chicago Bulls College Prep and an Instructor at Accelerate Institute&rsquo;s principal fellowship program at Kellogg School of Management, join us to discuss best practices.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="http://afsaadmin.org/our-union/staff-board/clarice-berry/">Clarice Berry</a> is&nbsp;</em><em>the president of the <a href="https://twitter.com/AFSAUnion">Chicago Principals and Administrators Association</a>.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="http://chicagobullscollegeprep.noblenetwork.org/about/meet-our-principal">Tyson Kane</a> is&nbsp;</em><em>founding Principal at <a href="https://twitter.com/benoble">Chicago Bulls College Prep</a> and an Instructor at <a href="https://twitter.com/accelerateinst">Accelerate Institute</a>&rsquo;s principal fellowship program at Kellogg School of Management.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/209374756&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Englewood youth baseball</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Strained relationships between the police and the community are unfortunately common in many cities, and Chicago is no different. From the acquittal of Chicago police officer Dante Servin, to the shooting death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald by two Chicago officers, the trust in law enforcement remains shaky. One South Side community group aims to help mend the fences by getting Chicago cops and kids from Englewood playing baseball together. Teamwork Englewood organized the <a href="https://twitter.com/EPYBLeague">Englewood Police/Youth Baseball League</a> earlier this year to get cops in a coaching and mentoring role. The co-ed league is housed at Hamilton Park and the teams are almost ready for opening day on June 24. Representatives from Teamwork Englewood and the police commander of the Englewood district discuss the program.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/forfitchi">Andrea Na&#39;Tay</a> is a league organizer.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="https://twitter.com/tmwkenglewood">Perry Gunn</a> is <a href="http://t.co/5bis9aU1fB">Teamwork Englewood</a>&#39;s Executive Director.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="http://home.chicagopolice.org/community/districts/7th-district-englewood/">Cmdr. Larry Watson</a> represents the Chicago Police Department&#39;s 7th-District.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pub/glen-brooks/10/615/765">Glen Brooks</a> is a&nbsp;</em><em>CAPS coordinator.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/209374751&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">J. Fernandez</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><a href="http://www.jfernandez.org/">The music of J. Fernandez</a> sounds old and new, trippy and straight ahead. Some sounds are found, some are of his own creation. A mapmaker for Rand McNally here in Chicago by day and musician by night, Fernandez&rsquo;s music has been described as &ldquo;a kind of textural, geometric indie rock&rdquo; by The Guardian and &ldquo;proudly intelligent&rdquo; by the New York Times. The debut album <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/many-levels-of-laughter/id984595696">Many Levels of Laughter</a>&nbsp;comes out Tuesday. Before he heads off to continue a tour with Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Morning Shift introduces you to J. Fernandez&rsquo; music and story.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/jnandez">J. Fernandez</a> and his band are Chicago-based.</em></p></p> Mon, 08 Jun 2015 08:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-06-08/morning-shift-englewood-youth-baseball-112151 Housing group wants CHA to slow down Altgeld redevelopment http://www.wbez.org/news/housing-group-wants-cha-slow-down-altgeld-redevelopment-110503 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Altgeld_Gardens.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A social justice nonprofit long involved in desegregating Chicago public housing wants redevelopment on the far South Side to slow down.</p><p>Five hundred units are slated for rehab at Altgeld Gardens, a de-industrialized area with a population that&rsquo;s black and low income. Business and Professional People for Public Interest wants the Chicago Housing Authority to first put in more amenities, such as a community center and an upgraded library.</p><p>&ldquo;Improve the quality of life for the community, for the families that live there now. When you&rsquo;ve done that, make a determination whether it&rsquo;s the right thing or not to bring back 500 units. But CHA&rsquo;s doing it in the reverse order,&rdquo; said Julie Brown, a lawyer with BPI. Motions have been filed in federal court.</p><p>Brown said BPI hasn&rsquo;t asked Judge Marvin Aspen to rule on anything except for the parties to mediate. Aspen is the same judge from the Gautreaux case, a class-action lawsuit BPI filed against CHA to end the segregation of black families in public housing.</p><p>But CHA officials and current Altgeld residents are actually on the same page. Both parties say upgrades to facilities are in the works, and they want more families to move back to a rehabbed Altgeld.</p><p>Resident Cheryl Johnson said BPI is out of touch, and fixing up facilities shouldn&rsquo;t stop CHA from also fixing up apartments.</p><p>&ldquo;As a legal tenant holder I have the right to consultation of what&rsquo;s going to have an impact on my quality of my life. These folks have never lived in public housing,&rdquo; Johnson said.</p><p>CHA officials said work is being done to improve school, transportation and recreational facilities at Altgeld. The housing complex was originally built in 1945. Currently, more than 1,200 units are occupied and CHA is expected to present an implementation strategy to residents in the coming months.</p><p>&ldquo;While CHA cannot speak specifically about the motion, it has worked closely with residents and the larger Altgeld community with respect to the revitalization plan. The preferred design concept was the culmination of more than 25 meetings with residents, community members, sister agencies and organizations, including BPI,&rdquo; a statement read.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" rel="author">Natalie Moore</a>&nbsp;is WBEZ&rsquo;s South Side Bureau reporter.&nbsp;<a href="mailto:nmoore@wbez.org">nmoore@wbez.org</a>&nbsp;Follow Natalie on<a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" rel="me">Google+</a>, &nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Twitter</a></em></p></p> Wed, 16 Jul 2014 09:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/housing-group-wants-cha-slow-down-altgeld-redevelopment-110503 New report reveals pervasive discrimination in housing voucher program http://www.wbez.org/news/new-report-reveals-pervasive-discrimination-housing-voucher-program-109946 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/housing-voucher_140331_nm.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The Chicago Lawyers&rsquo; Committee for Civil Rights Under Law spent two years investigating discrimination in the subsidized housing market and found rampant racial discrimination.</p><p>Subsidized housing vouchers, commonly referred to as Section 8, allow families to rent in the private market. <a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fcafha.net%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2014%2F02%2FCLCCRUL-CHA-testing-report.pdf&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNF013SD2bWvufFKrTbwg1pmiD90Kg">A new report outlines the discrimination</a>.</p><p>To assess fair housing practices, trained investigators posing as potential tenants inquire about availability, terms and conditions to assess compliance. White and black testers, with comparable backgrounds, tried to rent from landlords.</p><p>Landlords already participating in the voucher program discriminated against tenants based on race 33 percent of the time, most commonly by steering them to other buildings or neighborhoods. This also happened based on disabilities 44 percent of the time and against families with children 25 percent of the time.</p><p>Landlords in opportunity areas - places with low poverty - who were not participating in the Chicago Housing Authority&rsquo;s voucher program discriminated against white testers with vouchers 55 percent of the time. In 39 percent of the tests, landlords directly refused to rent to them. And a little more than half of the landlords who told white testers that they accepted vouchers discriminated against African American testers who said they had vouchers. Opportunity areas are an important tool to break up segregation in the housing market; voucher holders tend to be clustered in low-income, segregated black communities.</p><p>&ldquo;Race is still a pressing concern within the city of Chicago and within our region. Even though this happened specifically within Chicago, it&rsquo;s probably not a surprise to any of us that it&rsquo;s probably the reality going even beyond that scope,&rdquo; said Morgan Davis, executive director of the Chicago Area Fair Housing Alliance.</p><p>The study was conducted for the CHA. In a statement, the agency said it takes allegations of fair housing violations very seriously and &ldquo;educates owners, property managers and participants to ensure that federal, state and local fair housing laws are adhered upon. CHA also assists the Chicago Commission on Human Relations in its investigations of potential housing discrimination cases and/or fair housing violations.&rdquo;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" rel="author">Natalie Moore</a> is a WBEZ reporter. <a href="mailto:nmoore@wbez.org">nmoore@wbez.org</a><u>&nbsp;</u>Follow Natalie on <a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" rel="me">Google+</a>, &nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Twitter</a></em></p></p> Tue, 01 Apr 2014 07:53:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/new-report-reveals-pervasive-discrimination-housing-voucher-program-109946 CHA launches pilot program for formerly incarcerated http://www.wbez.org/news/cha-launches-pilot-program-formerly-incarcerated-109932 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Cook County Jail Holding Cell_0.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>The Chicago Housing Authority is launching a pilot program so people with criminal backgrounds can live with family members in public housing.</p><p>The family reunification program will allow 50 formerly incarcerated individuals to move back into CHA housing over the next three years. Normally, CHA prohibits anyone with a criminal background to live with relatives. This new program will also include residency in the subsidized housing voucher program, known as Section 8.</p><p>Once people leave prison they often have nowhere to go and return to neighborhoods with high crime and poverty.</p><p>Recently, <a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wbez.org%2Fnews%2Fback-old-neighborhood-parolees-struggle-fresh-starts-109685&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNF84CwnJ3U0mSOlyQbLwesWEK3lbA">WBEZ analyzed 2012 data from the Illinois Department of Corrections</a>, and found that thousands of adults return to just a handful of Chicago zip codes after they get out of prison. For example, four West Side zip codes &ndash; 60651, 60644, 60624 and 60612 &ndash; had more than 2,400 parolees return in that one year alone. Many of these neighborhoods already have high rates of violence, unemployment and poverty. The large number of parolees living there becomes a collective burden increasingly hard to bear.</p><p>CHA CEO Michael Merchant said the family reunification program is important because it can &ldquo;support these ex-offenders coming out making sure they have stable environments. I think it&rsquo;s a win-win for everybody. The main thing is we want to make sure the ex-offenders don&rsquo;t become re-offenders out in our neighborhoods.&rdquo;</p><p>Those selected must be on a path toward self-sufficiency and rehabilitation. The Safer Foundation, Lutheran Family Services and St. Leonard&rsquo;s House are the service providers that will recommend the 50 people.</p><p>&ldquo;This is a big step for the city of Chicago to partner with people with criminal records...it will help them reintegrate into the communities,&rdquo; said Anthony Lowery, the policy and advocacy director at the Safer Foundation.</p><p>Sex offenders and people convicted of arson, production of methamphetamine in public housing and fraud with federal housing will not be allowed in the program. They are banned by federal policy.</p><p>The CHA board and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development must first approve the pilot program.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" rel="author">Natalie Moore</a> is a WBEZ reporter. <a href="mailto:nmoore@wbez.org">nmoore@wbez.org</a><u>.&nbsp;</u>Follow Natalie on <a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" rel="me">Google+</a>&nbsp;and &nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Twitter</a></em></p></p> Fri, 28 Mar 2014 07:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/cha-launches-pilot-program-formerly-incarcerated-109932 Cabrini-Green ready for final phase of redevelopment http://www.wbez.org/sections/work/cabrini-green-ready-final-phase-redevelopment-109609 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/CHA.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">The Chicago Housing Authority is speeding up construction of the final 65 acres at Cabrini-Green still open for redevelopment.</p><p>Cabrini-Green started its transformation from public to mixed-income housing in 1994 when the federal government awarded a <a href="http://tellingourstory.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/CONSENT-DECREE.pdf" target="_blank">$50 million HOPE VI Grant </a>to facilitate redevelopment of the Cabrini Extension North site. Over the years high- and mid-rise apartments fell to demolition. Two decades later, the once-poor Near North Side neighborhood now teems with luxury condos and new businesses like Starbucks.</p><p>Next week, CHA officials will hold open houses for developers who will learn what parameters the agency has designed for construction of new housing and retail. The land boundaries are North Avenue to Chicago Avenue and Halsted to Orleans.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;ve gathered this approach so that we could be able to work with multiple developers at one time and to have multiple parcels delivered in an expedient fashion,&rdquo; said Sharnette Brown, development manager for CHA.</p><p>Brown said this will give CHA more control of redevelopment.</p><p>Cabrini&rsquo;s revamping was a prelude to CHA&rsquo;s 1999 Plan for Transformation, the $1.6 billion blueprint to build or rehab 25,000 public housing units with mixed-income housing as the centerpiece. That formula is one-third market rate, one-third affordable and one-third public. The plan &ndash; scheduled for 2015 completion &ndash; has run into economic and housing slump roadblocks.</p><p>Last spring CHA unveiled <a href="http://www.wbez.org/cha-reveals-next-phase-massive-public-housing-redevelopment-106757" target="_blank">Plan Forward </a>as a way to wrap up the final stretch. Former CHA CEO Charles Woodyard <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/former-cha-ceo-woodyard-resigned-amid-sexual-harassment-allegations-109182" target="_blank">resigned last fall amid sexual harassment allegations</a>, but also because City Hall became disenchanted with the slow pace of progress.</p><p>The goal is for Cabrini construction to start by 2015 on the mostly vacant 65 acres. The Cabrini rowhouses will remain but not be 100 percent public housing &ndash; much to the chagrin of many residents. Of the 583 units, 146 have been redeveloped into public housing and will stay that way. The others are empty. Originally, CHA had planned to keep the row houses all public housing.</p><p>&ldquo;We felt that in order for Plan Forward to work, in order to have a very vibrant community and what works for the residents to move toward self sufficiency, it was important to do mixed income. Not to leave that area to be the only secluded area that remained 100 percent public housing,&rdquo; Brown said.</p><p>Carol Steele is an activist who lives in the row houses, which she said have more bedrooms and can better accommodate families.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re adamant that the row houses be rehabbed to 100 percent public housing like it was supposed to be,&rdquo; Steele said.</p><p>Steele said residents are less concerned about amenities and retail because they have now come to the community, including a recent Target. But they still want more public housing and the opportunity for displaced low-income Cabrini residents to return to the now-flourishing community.</p><p>&ldquo;We have an abundance of stores. We want what was promised,&rdquo; she said.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" rel="author" target="_blank">Natalie Moore</a> is a WBEZ reporter. <a href="mailto:nmoore@wbez.org">nmoore@wbez.org</a>.</em><em>&nbsp;Follow Natalie on <a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" rel="me" target="_blank">Google+</a>, &nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore" target="_blank">Twitter</a></em></p></p> Thu, 30 Jan 2014 17:40:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/sections/work/cabrini-green-ready-final-phase-redevelopment-109609 Sisters sue Chicago Housing Authority over drug testing http://www.wbez.org/news/sisters-sue-chicago-housing-authority-over-drug-testing-109466 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/cha drug_140106_nm (2).jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Two sisters who live in a Chicago Housing Authority mixed-income development are suing the agency over its practice of suspicionless drug testing.</p><p>DeAnn and Jessica Stubenfield live with their mother in a townhouse in Oakwood Shores off Pershing Road, surrounded by black-and-white photography and their school awards. DeAnn attends Harold Washington College and Jessica is a recent Columbia College graduate.</p><p>Each year, during lease renewal, they are required under CHA rules to take a drug test. Jessica has taken it once, but now refuses.</p><p>&ldquo;I shouldn&rsquo;t have to be violated and have my rights be violated to try to prove to people that I&rsquo;m this clean person,&rdquo; said Jessica Stubenfield, who is 23 years old. Her sister DeAnn is 19.</p><p>The Stubenfields filed a lawsuit in federal court last fall to stop the CHA from testing residents in mixed-income housing projects for drugs. They are also seeking unspecified damages for residents who have been subjected to drug testing.</p><p>&ldquo;I almost backed out [of the lawsuit], but I said, &lsquo;Let me go through with it,&rdquo; DeAnn Stubenfield said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;ll be worth it in the end. It will be better for everybody else, not just for me, not just for my family. I was thinking about the future.&rdquo;</p><p>Over the past decade, <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/housing/cha-not-living-promises-mixed-income-housing-102522">mixed-income communities have replaced high-rise public housing</a> buildings around the city. Oakwood Shores is where the Ida B. Wells and Darrow Homes once stood.</p><p>The new developments have public-, affordable-, and market-rate housing renters. All of them are subject to drug testing.</p><p>And that is a concern to advocates. Last August, the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois filed its own <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/aclu-sues-chicago-housing-authority-over-drug-testing-policy-108422">lawsuit</a> against CHA on behalf of public housing residents in mixed-income communities who are drug-tested. These cases will have a joint hearing in May.</p><p>CHA is the only public housing agency in the country that tests for drugs, lawyers say. In 2011, ACLU filed a Freedom of Information Act request to find out the number of CHA residents who have tested positive for drugs. Attorneys learned that of approximately 1,600 residents 18 years and older who lived in mixed-income public housing, 51 tested positive over a period of several years.</p><p>But CHA stands by the policy.</p><p>&quot;Through the CHA&#39;s mixed-income program, public housing families reside in new, privately owned and privately operated alongside market-rate and affordable renters. One of the requirements of all the renters is that they follow property rules. And if those rules happen to include drug testing, then public housing families - like their market-rate and affordable renter neighbors - must adhere to those rules,&rdquo; CHA said in a statement.</p><p>A common criticism is that CHA residents do not have the right to complain about drug testing because they live in subsidized housing. The Stubenfields&rsquo; attorney chafes at that logic.</p><p>&ldquo;If people are in favor of this drug testing because the CHA residents receive government funds, you have to look at all the people who receive government funds,&rdquo; said Samantha Liskow, referring to varied groups of people such as college students.</p><p>On Dec. 31 a federal judge struck down a law that required drug testing of all welfare recipients. Liskow said that has an enormous impact on the federal CHA case.</p><p>&ldquo;We believe that will apply in full force here,&rdquo; Liskow said.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" rel="author">Natalie Moore</a> is a WBEZ reporter. <a href="mailto:nmoore@wbez.org">nmoore@wbez.org</a></em></p><p><em>Follow Natalie on <a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" rel="me">Google+</a>, &nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Twitter</a></em></p></p> Mon, 06 Jan 2014 11:10:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/sisters-sue-chicago-housing-authority-over-drug-testing-109466 Former CHA CEO Woodyard resigned amid sexual harassment allegations http://www.wbez.org/news/former-cha-ceo-woodyard-resigned-amid-sexual-harassment-allegations-109182 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/cha_131118_nm.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Charles Woodyard, the former CEO of the Chicago Housing Authority, left the agency amid sexual harassment allegations, WBEZ has learned.</p><p>On Oct. 15, Woodyard abruptly&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-housing-authority-ceo-resigns-108927">resigned</a> after two years on the job. At the time CHA released a statement that quoted Woodyard as saying &ldquo;I am pursuing other opportunities that I hope will benefit my family and my career.&rdquo; Woodyard added he wanted to &ldquo;spend more time guiding&rdquo; his teenage son. But on Oct. 14, CHA signed a $99,000 settlement agreement with a former employee. WBEZ obtained the confidential agreement.</p><p>The female employee &ndash; whose name is redacted in records &ndash; alleges that she was a victim of sexual harassment, including physical contact by Woodyard. She alleges that she continues to require medical treatment for physical and emotional distress.</p><p>CHA and Woodyard deny the allegations.</p><p>&quot;The allegations are false. I never sexually harassed anyone,&quot; Woodyard told WBEZ.</p><p>The agreement says that one of the public housing agency&rsquo;s reasons for settling is to avoid the expense and inconvenience of defending itself. The $99,000 includes back wages, attorneys&rsquo; fees and medical treatment for the former employee.</p><p>&ldquo;The board took this allegation seriously, and determined it was in the best interest of the agency to settle it,&rdquo; CHA board chair Z. Scott said in a statement.</p><p>In August, the female employee filed a charge of discrimination with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission that said &ldquo;during my employment, I was subject to sexual harassment. I complained to Respondent. Subsequently, I was disciplined and discharged. I believe that I have been discriminated against because of my sex, female, and in retaliation for engaging in protected activity.&rdquo; She indicated that the latest discrimination took place in June.</p><p>Mayor Rahm Emanuel appointed Woodyard in 2011. Lewis Jordan, the previous CEO, was pushed out amid questions surrounding CHA credit card use. Woodyard had run the public housing authority in Charlotte, N.C. and has an extensive real estate background. His resignation from CHA took effect Nov. 1.</p><p>Beyond the sexual harassment allegations, there had also been concerns about how quickly Woodyard was getting things done. CHA is two years from supposedly finishing its massive original $1.6 billion Plan for Transformation, the blueprint for tearing down public housing and replacing some developments with mixed-income communities. CHA revealed Plan Forward, the second phase of the plan, this past spring. It focuses on acquiring homes in neighborhoods across the city for rehab and boosting economic activity around CHA sites.</p><p>The economy and fickle housing market have slowed down progress especially for selling market-rate units. Meanwhile, CHA promised it would rehabilitate or redevelop 25,000 units for public housing families. For fiscal year 2014, CHA plans to deliver 562 public housing units, but none of them will be on mixed-income sites. Originally, the Plan for Transformation was a five-year plan. Today, it&rsquo;s supposed to be completed by 2015. That would mean the CHA would have to deliver a whopping 7,000 units by then.</p><p>Michael Merchant, former commissioner of the city Department of Buildings, is the new CEO.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" rel="author">Natalie Moore</a> is a WBEZ reporter. Email:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:nmoore@wbez.org">nmoore@wbez.org</a>&nbsp;Follow Natalie on <a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" rel="me">Google+</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Twitter</a></em></p></p> Mon, 18 Nov 2013 14:24:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/former-cha-ceo-woodyard-resigned-amid-sexual-harassment-allegations-109182