WBEZ | groundwater http://www.wbez.org/tags/groundwater Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en The 'fountain of youth' at Schiller Woods http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/fountain-youth-schiller-woods-110099 <p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/DaVZUfKT2d0?rel=0" width="640"></iframe></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/151751087&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe><em>Editor&#39;s note: The radio story about the Schiller Woods water pump begins at 8 minutes and 40 seconds in this audio file above.&nbsp;</em></p><p>Curious City recently got two very similar questions about a peculiar pump in the Schiller Woods Forest Preserve, about one mile east of Chicago&rsquo;s O&rsquo;Hare International Airport.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/leslie treece FOR WEB.jpg" style="height: 132px; width: 200px; float: left;" title="Leslie Treece, who drives by the Schiller Woods pump weekly. (WBEZ/Logan Jaffe)" />&ldquo;We pass by it all the time, and there&rsquo;s always a line with people filling up jugs and jugs and jugs of water,&rdquo; said Leslie Treece, a 43-year-old dance teacher from the Portage Park neighborhood. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re thinking we&rsquo;re missing something. What&rsquo;s going on? Are we not clued in to something special?&rdquo;</p><p>Larry Powers, 70, also sees people flocking to the pump on West Irving Park Road while he&rsquo;s traveling from his home in Oak Park to play handball in Des Plaines.</p><p>United by thirst for answers &mdash; if not actual water &mdash; both Larry and Leslie asked us versions of this basic question:</p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align: center;"><em>What&rsquo;s so special about the water in Schiller Woods?</em></p><p>When we first met Leslie and Larry, neither had tried the water, but neither had they had the opportunity to hear directly from people who draw from the pump.</p><p>We brought the two together for a&nbsp;<a href="http://youtu.be/DaVZUfKT2d0" target="_blank">video shoot</a> to face the pump and the hard truth: that the answer to whether there&rsquo;s something special in the park&rsquo;s well water depends on who you ask.<img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/larry FOR WEB.jpg" style="height: 133px; width: 200px; float: right;" title="Larry Powers, who's been curious about the water pump for over 40 years. (WBEZ/Logan Jaffe)" /></p><p><strong>The official line</strong></p><p>From the perspective of the Forest Preserve District of Cook County, it&rsquo;s certainly their most popular pump. In fact, FPDCC Maintenance Supervisor Len Dufkis said they have to repair the creaky metal apparatus every year, or about ten times more often than the rest of district&rsquo;s 212 water pumps. Its allure goes back to 1945, when the pump was first installed.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s many myths, legends, stories &mdash; that this is holy water, this has medicinal qualities to it &mdash; you name it, people have said it,&rdquo; Dufkis said.</p><p>If, as some people claim, the pump taps into a fountain of youth, it&rsquo;s of the <em>Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade</em> variety; &nbsp;the pump itself is nondescript, even a little shoddy-looking. Its metal piping rises about four feet out of the ground, a long handle protruding out towards the paved walkway that connects it to Irving Park Road. Its piston rattles and squeaks as it pumps clear water from a spigot a few feet off the ground.</p><p>So what&rsquo;s special about it, chemically? The water, which comes from an aquifer that begins some 31 feet below ground, is very hard &mdash; about 19 grains per gallon, according to a free testing service at Home Depot. That means its mineral content is off the charts compared to tap water, but it&rsquo;s typical for well water.</p><p>Len Dufkis, who maintains the Forest Preserve&rsquo;s pumps, said the Illinois Department of Public Health tests the water every six months for potentially harmful bacteria, but they don&#39;t delve into its chemical profile. Ten years ago, however, the Forest Preserve did. They found an unusually low iron content in this particular water, which may distinguish it from similar groundwater. But it still doesn&rsquo;t explain why just across the street another pump that draws from the same aquifer fails to draw the crowds.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Image1_3.jpg" style="height: 349px; width: 620px;" title="The particular well, known as the Fountain of Youth, is just west of the model airplane flying field in Schiller Woods Forest Preserve. " /></p><p><strong>How does it taste?</strong></p><p>No matter the weather or time of day, it seems, someone is crouched at the pump, collecting water from the spout.</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;ve lived here since 1972, and since then that pump is constantly in use, no matter what the weather,&rdquo; said Larry Szlendak, 64, who moved to the nearby village of Harwood Heights from Bialystok, Poland. &nbsp;</p><p>He started drinking Schiller Woods a few years later.</p><p>Szlendak said the water&rsquo;s mineral taste reminds him of well water he&rsquo;s had in Colorado and in his native Poland. He speculates that might be why many evangelists of Schiller Woods water were born in Eastern Europe, Latin America, or other regions where well water is more common.</p><p>(Interestingly, of the water&rsquo;s supposedly special powers, Szlendak said he once watered half of his plants with Schiller Woods water and half with tap water. He claims the plants with Schiller water grew much better.)<img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/pump%20wide%20shot%20FOR%20WEB.jpg" style="float: left; height: 214px; width: 350px;" title="The water is drawn from an underground aquifer and is a trace bit low on iron. (WBEZ/Shawn Allee)" /></p><p>Neil Parker, who grew up in suburban Detroit, also pegged the taste to childhood memories of feeling close to the land.</p><p>&ldquo;This reminds me of growing up,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;The flavors, it tastes like when you&rsquo;re camping.&rdquo;</p><p>Most Chicago-area tap water comes from Lake Michigan. It&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="https://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/water/supp_info/education/water_treatment.html">filtered and treated</a> with several chemicals typical to drinking water treatment processes in the United States, including chlorine and fluoride. Almost two-thirds of Americans drink fluoridated water,&nbsp;<a href="http://water.epa.gov/drink/contaminants/basicinformation/fluoride.cfm">which since 1945 has helped prevent tooth decay</a> in what The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called &ldquo;one of 10 great public achievements of the 20th century.&rdquo;</p><p><a href="http://www.chemheritage.org/discover/media/magazine/articles/29-2-pipe-dreams-americas-fluoride-controversy.aspx">Its use remains controversial among some communities</a>, however, and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/17/water-fluoridation">several European countries have stopped fluorides under public pressure</a>. Several of the people I talked to at the Schiller Woods pump cited its lack of fluoride as a major motivation for their stockpile of water cooler jugs.</p><p><strong>Water with a reputation</strong></p><p>Word travels fast among well water drinkers, so most people learn about the pump via personal recommendation.</p><p>Others, though, used the Internet to find the Schiller Woods pump. Nick and Sue Chervinko, originally from suburban Cicero and Niles respectively, were among several people who mentioned <a href="http://www.findaspring.com/locations/north-america/usa/fountain-of-youth-shiller-park-il/">FindaSpring.com</a> &mdash; a website that lists this pump as one of only two sources of spring water in the area. (Waterfall Glenn Well in Lemont, Ill. is the other.)</p><p>But in addition to that online following, the pump also fosters a tangible sense of community. Polish-born Elizabeth Osika said she&rsquo;s made many friends while waiting in line for Schiller Woods water.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s like recreation for me,&rdquo; said Osika, who came from Elmhurst to fill up a basketful of plastic jugs. &ldquo;You talk to people waiting in line. We make friends here.&rdquo;</p><p>While we were talking, Osika chatted up two more Polish pump-water enthusiasts who had queued up. She looked at one man toting several plastic bottles and empty gallon jugs and asked, disbelievingly, &ldquo;That&rsquo;s all you have?&rdquo;</p><p>The man, who gave his name only as Rajmund, said he moved to Chicago from Poland 15 years ago and started drinking Schiller Woods spring water soon after. Rajmund said he&rsquo;s seen truck drivers stop off to fill up water bottles for the road.</p><p>Question asker Leslie Treece filled up a bottle, too, before driving off. With her husband John, Leslie said they used to tease their son Jack Gitschlag, saying the water could cure his sunburns. Larry Powers, who also asked us about the water, was similarly impressed.</p><p>Having tried the water, our question askers aren&rsquo;t sold on its youth-giving properties. But they do like the taste.</p><p>&ldquo;I was pleasantly surprised,&rdquo; Leslie said. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m going to stop from now on, and maybe get a bigger jug.&rdquo;</p><p><em><a href="http://cabentley.com/">Chris Bentley</a> is a reporter for WBEZ&rsquo;s Curious City, and a freelance journalist. Follow him on Twitter at&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/Cementley">@Cementley</a>.</em></p></p> Tue, 29 Apr 2014 13:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/fountain-youth-schiller-woods-110099 Tritium leaks found at Illinois nuclear sites http://www.wbez.org/story/tritium-leaks-found-illinois-nuclear-sites-88386 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-June/2011-06-27/56873321.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Radioactive tritium has leaked from three-quarters of U.S. commercial nuclear power sites, often into groundwater from corroded, buried piping, an Associated Press investigation shows.</p><div><p>The number and severity of the leaks has been escalating, even as federal regulators extend the licenses of more and more reactors across the nation.</p><p>Tritium, which is a radioactive form of hydrogen, has leaked from at least 48 of 65 sites, according to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission records reviewed as part of the AP's yearlong examination of safety issues at aging nuclear power plants. Leaks from at least 37 of those facilities contained concentrations exceeding the federal drinking water standard — sometimes at hundreds of times the limit.</p><p>While most leaks have been found within plant boundaries, some have migrated offsite. But none is known to have reached public water supplies.</p><p>At three sites — two in Illinois and one in Minnesota — leaks have contaminated drinking wells of nearby homes, the records show, but not at levels violating the drinking water standard. At a fourth site, in New Jersey, tritium has leaked into an aquifer and a discharge canal feeding picturesque Barnegat Bay off the Atlantic Ocean.</p><p>In response to the AP's investigation, two congressman — Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts and Peter Welsh of Vermont, both Democrats — on Tuesday released a study by independent federal analysts who had identified problems with the regulation of underground piping.</p><p>The report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office noted that while the industry has a voluntary initiative to monitor leaks into underground water sources, the NRC hasn't evaluated how promptly that system detects such leaks. "Absent such an assessment, we continue to believe that NRC has no assurance that the Groundwater Protection Initiative will lead to prompt detection of underground piping system leaks as nuclear power plants age," the report's authors concluded.</p><p>Any exposure to radioactivity, no matter how slight, boosts cancer risk, according to the National Academy of Sciences. Federal regulators set a limit for how much tritium is allowed in drinking water, where this contaminant poses its main health risk. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says tritium should measure no more than 20,000 picocuries per liter in drinking water. The agency estimates seven of 200,000 people who drink such water for decades would develop cancer.</p><p>The tritium leaks also have spurred doubts among independent engineers about the reliability of emergency safety systems at the 104 nuclear reactors situated on the 65 sites. That's partly because some of the leaky underground pipes carry water meant to cool a reactor in an emergency shutdown and to prevent a meltdown. Fast moving, tritium can indicate the presence of more powerful radioactive isotopes, like cesium-137 and strontium-90.</p><p>So far, federal and industry officials say, the tritium leaks pose no health or safety threat. Tony Pietrangelo, chief nuclear officer of the industry's Nuclear Energy Institute, said impacts are "next to zero."</p><p>___</p><p><strong>LEAKS ARE PROLIFIC</strong></p><p>Like rust under a car, corrosion has propagated for decades along the hard-to-reach, wet underbellies of the reactors — generally built in a burst of construction during the 1960s and 1970s.</p><p>There were 38 leaks from underground piping between 2000 and 2009, according to an industry document presented at a tritium conference. Nearly two-thirds of the leaks were reported over the latest five years.</p><p>For example, at the three-unit Browns Ferry complex in Alabama, a valve was mistakenly left open in a storage tank during modifications over the years. When the tank was filled in April 2010, about 1,000 gallons of tritium-laden water poured onto the ground at a concentration of 2 million picocuries per liter. In drinking water, that would be 100 times higher than the EPA health standard.</p><p>And in 2008, 7.5 million picocuries per liter leaked from underground piping at Quad Cities in western Illinois — 375 times the EPA limit.</p><p>Subsurface water not only rusts underground pipes, it attacks other buried components, including electrical cables that carry signals to control operations.</p><p>A 2008 NRC staff memo reported industry data showing 83 failed cables between 21 and 30 years of service — but only 40 within their first 10 years of service. Underground cabling set in concrete can be extraordinarily difficult to replace.</p><p>Under NRC rules, tiny concentrations of tritium and other contaminants are routinely released in monitored increments from nuclear plants; leaks from corroded pipes are not permitted.</p><p>The leaks sometimes go undiscovered for years, the AP found. Many of the pipes or tanks have been patched, and contaminated soil and water have been removed in some places. But leaks are often discovered later from other nearby piping, tanks or vaults. Mistakes and defective material have contributed to some leaks. However, corrosion — from decades of use and deterioration — is the main cause. And, safety engineers say, the rash of leaks suggest nuclear operators are hard put to maintain the decades-old systems.</p><p>Over the history of the U.S. industry, more than 400 known radioactive leaks of all kinds of substances have occurred, the activist Union of Concerned Scientists reported in September.</p><p>Nuclear engineer Bill Corcoran, an industry consultant who has taught NRC personnel how to analyze the cause of accidents, said that since much of the piping is inaccessible and carries cooling water, the worry is if the pipes leak there could be a meltdown.</p><p>"Any leak is a problem because you have the leak itself — but it also says something about the piping," said Mario V. Bonaca, a former member of the NRC's Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. "Evidently something has to be done."</p><p>However, even with the best probes, it is hard to pinpoint partial cracks or damage in skinny pipes or bends. The industry tends to inspect piping when it must be dug up for some other reason. Even when leaks are detected, repairs may be postponed for up to two years with the NRC's blessing.</p><p>"You got pipes that have been buried underground for 30 or 40 years, and they've never been inspected, and the NRC is looking the other way," said engineer Paul Blanch, who has worked for the industry and later became a whistleblower. "They could have corrosion all over the place."</p><p>___</p><p><strong>EAST COAST ISSUES</strong></p><p>One of the highest known tritium readings was discovered in 2002 at the Salem nuclear plant in Lower Alloways Creek Township, N.J. Tritium leaks from the spent fuel pool contaminated groundwater under the facility — located on an island in Delaware Bay — at a concentration of 15 million picocuries per liter. That's 750 times the EPA drinking water limit. According to NRC records, the tritium readings last year still exceeded EPA drinking water standards.</p><p>And tritium found separately in an onsite storm drain system measured 1 million picocuries per liter in April 2010.</p><p>Also last year, the operator, PSEG Nuclear, discovered 680 feet of corroded, buried pipe that is supposed to carry cooling water to Salem Unit 1 in an accident, according to an NRC report. Some had worn down to a quarter of its minimum required thickness, though no leaks were found. The piping was dug up and replaced.</p><p>The operator had not visually inspected the piping — the surest way to find corrosion— since the reactor went on line in 1977, according to the NRC. PSEG Nuclear was found to be in violation of NRC rules because it hadn't even tested the piping since 1988.</p><p>Last year, the Vermont Senate was so troubled by tritium leaks as high as 2.5 million picocuries per liter at the Vermont Yankee reactor in southern Vermont (125 times the EPA drinking-water standard) that it voted to block relicensing — a power that the Legislature holds in that state.</p><p>In March, the NRC granted the plant a 20-year license extension, despite the state opposition. Weeks ago, operator Entergy sued Vermont in federal court, challenging its authority to force the plant to close.</p><p>At 41-year-old Oyster Creek in southern New Jersey, the country's oldest operating reactor, the latest tritium troubles started in April 2009, a week after it was relicensed for 20 more years. That's when plant workers discovered tritium by chance in about 3,000 gallons of water that had leaked into a concrete vault housing electrical lines.</p><p>Since then, workers have found leaking tritium three more times at concentrations up to 10.8 million picocuries per liter — 540 times the EPA's drinking water limit — according to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. None has been directly measured in drinking water, but it has been found in an aquifer and in a canal discharging into nearby Barnegat Bay, a popular spot for swimming, boating and fishing.</p><p>___</p><p><strong>EXELON'S PIPING PROBLEMS</strong></p><p>To Oyster Creek owner Exelon — the country's biggest nuclear operator, with 17 units — piping problems are just a fact of life. At a meeting with regulators in 2009, representatives of Exelon acknowledged that "100 percent verification of piping integrity is not practical," according to a copy of its presentation.</p><p>Of course, the company could dig up the pipes and check them out. But that would be costly.</p><p>"Excavations have significant impact on plant operations," the company said.</p><p>Exelon has had some major leaks. At the company's two-reactor Dresden site west of Chicago, tritium has leaked into the ground at up to 9 million picocuries per liter — 450 times the federal limit for drinking water. Leaks from Dresden also have contaminated offsite drinking water wells, but below the EPA drinking water limit.</p><p>There's also been contamination of offsite drinking water wells near the two-unit Prairie Island plant southeast of Minneapolis, then operated by Nuclear Management Co. and now by Xcel Energy, and at Exelon's two-unit Braidwood nuclear facility, 10 miles from Dresden. The offsite tritium concentrations from both facilities also were below the EPA level.</p><p>The Prairie Island leak was found in the well of a nearby home in 1989. It was traced to a canal where radioactive waste was discharged.</p><p>Braidwood has leaked more than six million gallons of tritium-laden water in repeated leaks dating back to the 1990s — but not publicly reported until 2005. The leaks were traced to pipes that carried limited, monitored discharges of tritium into the river.</p><p>"They weren't properly maintained, and some of them had corrosion," said Exelon spokeswoman Krista Lopykinski.</p><p>Last year, Exelon, which has acknowledged violating Illinois state groundwater standards, agreed to pay $1.2 million to settle state and county complaints over the tritium leaks at Braidwood and nearby Dresden and Byron sites. The NRC also sanctioned Exelon.</p><p>Tritium measuring 1,500 picocuries per liter turned up in an offsite drinking well at a home near Braidwood. Though company and industry officials did not view any of the Braidwood concentrations as dangerous, unnerved residents took to bottled water and sued over feared loss of property value. A consolidated lawsuit was dismissed, but Exelon ultimately bought some homes so residents could leave.</p><p>___</p><p><strong>PUBLIC RELATIONS EFFORT</strong></p><p>An NRC task force on tritium leaks last year dismissed the danger to public health. Instead, its report called the leaks "a challenging issue from the perspective of communications around environmental protection." The task force noted ruefully that the rampant leaking had "impacted public confidence."</p><p>For sure, the industry also is trying to stop the leaks. For several years now, plant owners around the country have been drilling more monitoring wells and taking a more aggressive approach in replacing old piping when leaks are suspected or discovered.</p><p>But such measures have yet to stop widespread leaking.</p><p>Meantime, the reactors keep getting older — 66 have been approved for 20-year extensions to their original 40-year licenses, with 16 more extensions pending. And, as the AP has been reporting in its ongoing series, Aging Nukes, regulators and industry have worked in concert to loosen safety standards to keep the plants operating.</p><p>In an initiative started last year, NRC Chairman Gregory Jaczko asked his staff to examine regulations on buried piping to evaluate if stricter standards or more inspections were needed.</p><p>The staff report, issued in June, openly acknowledged that the NRC "has not placed an emphasis on preventing" the leaks.</p><p>And they predicted even more.</p></div></p> Mon, 27 Jun 2011 14:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/tritium-leaks-found-illinois-nuclear-sites-88386