WBEZ | Arabic http://www.wbez.org/tags/arabic Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Many Arab cartoonists have responded to the tragedy in Paris with a sense of shared grief http://www.wbez.org/news/many-arab-cartoonists-have-responded-tragedy-paris-sense-shared-grief-113825 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/WALED-TAHER-2478.jpg" alt="" /><p><div><p>The French Tricolour has been emblazoned on landmarks as varied as London&#39;s Tower Bridge to Sydney&#39;s iconic opera house and featured in&nbsp;hundreds of political cartoons drawn in response to the vicious attacks in Paris last Friday. Satirists in the Arab and Muslim world are responding with different visual metaphors.&nbsp;</p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Lebanon looks in the mirror and sees France and says, &amp;quot;Dear Mother, I hope that you heal.&amp;quot; Cartoonist Arman Hamsy is illustrating the close historical ties between Lebanon and France. France ruled Lebanon under the French Mandate from 1920 until the end o" src="http://cdn1.pri.org/sites/default/files/styles/original_image/public/Guyer1_Mirror_0.jpg?itok=f-5ZDbtx" style="height: 310px; width: 310px; float: left; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" title="Lebanon looks in the mirror and sees France and says, &quot;Dear Mother, I hope that you heal.&quot; Cartoonist Arman Hamsy is illustrating the close historical ties between Lebanon and France. France ruled Lebanon under the French Mandate from 1920 until the end of World War II. (Arman Hamsy, Al-Nahar, Lebanon)" typeof="foaf:Image" /></p><div><p>Jonathan Guyer is a fellow with the&nbsp;<a href="http://http//www.icwa.org/" target="_blank">Institute of Current World Affairs</a>&nbsp;and a&nbsp;scholar of satire in the Middle East.&nbsp;&nbsp;&quot;I saw a cartoon in the Lebanese newspaper&nbsp;<a href="http://assafir.com/" target="_blank">As-Safir</a>. It shows a&nbsp;map of&nbsp;Lebanon looking in the mirror and seeing a map of France saying, &#39;Dear Mother, I hope that you heal.&#39;&quot;</p></div></div><p>Some Lebanese have felt slighted by the global embrace of Paris in the wake of the multi-prong attack by ISIS on Friday. Just a day earlier, 45 people died in Beirut in a brazen suicide bombing aimed at&nbsp;people, just like in Paris, who were just&nbsp;going about their daily business.&nbsp;&nbsp;The global response was anemic.&nbsp;Guyer acknowledges the difference in how the world reacted to the two incidents but says anger is not the emotion coming through in Arab&nbsp;political cartoons.</p><p>&#39;&#39;I&nbsp;think this really is about a connection between two cities more than a divisive set of events. It shows that terror, when any place in the world is struck, has an impact globally.&quot;</p><p>One of the most powerful images Guyer has seen was drawn by&nbsp;Anwar, a young cartoonist from Egypt. &quot;It shows a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.almasryalyoum.com/caricatures/details/9669" target="_blank">man wiping blood off of a window.</a>&nbsp;It&#39;s covered in this bright red blood. The caption says: &#39;From Baghdad to Beirut to Paris.&#39;&nbsp;My reading of it is that all blood is the same blood, whether it&#39;s Iraqi blood, Lebanese blood or Parisian blood. And it&#39;s this unifying message of when one of us suffers, we all suffer.&quot;</p><p>Guyer says for the past year or so, Arab and Muslim cartoonists have taken on ISIS, making fun of their so-called piety,&nbsp;their craven tactics and using them as a punchline. &quot;There&#39;s really no red line in the Middle East about making fun of ISIS.&quot; &nbsp;&nbsp;</p><div><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="In this cartoon, two men chat. One says, &amp;quot;How&amp;#039;s it going?&amp;quot; The other answers: &amp;quot;Fine!&amp;quot; The word &amp;#039;terrorism&amp;#039; is superimposed onto their limbs. From the artist’s point of view, terrorism is simply part of daily life." src="http://cdn1.pri.org/sites/default/files/styles/original_image/public/WALED-TAHER-2478.jpg?itok=eYd-1mEP" style="height: 377px; width: 500px;" title="In this cartoon, two men chat. One says, &quot;How's it going?&quot; The other answers: &quot;Fine!&quot; The word 'terrorism' is superimposed onto their limbs. From the artist’s point of view, terrorism is simply part of daily life. (Waled Taher, Al-Shorouk, Egypt) " typeof="foaf:Image" /></p><div><p>Some Arab world cartoons&nbsp;also betray a sense of resignation about terrorism.&nbsp;After Friday&#39;s bloodbath in Paris,&nbsp;Egyptian cartoonist Walid Taher republished a cartoon he originally drew last winter. In the cartoon,&nbsp;the word terrorism is spelled out on the two men&#39;s limbs while they greet each other as if nothing&#39;s happened.&nbsp;</p></div></div><p>Guyer says one depressing but predictable Arab world response to the Paris attacks are&nbsp;conspiracy comics. &quot;There&#39;s also a whole genre of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.jpost.com/Middle-East/Israel-behind-Paris-attacks-cartoons-on-Palestinian-social-media-insinuate-434254" target="_blank">conspiracy comics</a>&nbsp;which are totally ridiculous that show ISIS as the puppetry of the west or a zionist conspiracy. Obviously these are ridiculous notions but actually appear quite a lot in the Arab press.&quot;</p><div><img alt="Algerian cartoonist Le Hic uses the powerful imagery of Aylan Kurdi, the young boy who was found dead on a Turkish beach after drowning while trying to migrate to Europe. Aylan Kurdi&amp;#039;s image moved the world and Le Hic is making two points: those who died " src="http://cdn1.pri.org/sites/default/files/styles/original_image/public/Guyer_LeHic.jpg?itok=azrq0uGR" style="height: 310px; width: 500px;" title="Algerian cartoonist Le Hic uses the powerful imagery of Aylan Kurdi, the young boy who was found dead on a Turkish beach after drowning while trying to migrate to Europe. Aylan Kurdi's image moved the world and Le Hic is making two points: those who died in Paris are as precious as Aylan Kurdi. He's also suggesting that more people like Aylan Kurdi could die if European countries react to the ISIS attacks in Paris by closing their borders. (Le Hic, Algeria)" typeof="foaf:Image" /><div><p>The aftermath of terrorist attacks is always a tricky time for political cartoonists, says Guyer.&nbsp;&quot;What I would say is it&#39;s very difficult to encapsulate the complexity and nuance of an attack whether it be&nbsp;on Paris, Beirut or Baghdad.&quot;</p></div></div><p>Guyer feels like many artists have dumbed down the meaning of the Paris attacks, making it all about the colors of the French flag.&nbsp;&quot;I would love to see more comics and cartoons that take on personal reactions of what&#39;s happened and how people feel about it, messages&nbsp;that goes beyond simple notions of nation states,&quot; he says.</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://admin.pri.org/stories/2015-11-17/many-arab-cartoonists-have-responded-tragedy-paris-sense-shared-grief" target="_blank"><em> via PRI&#39;s The World</em></a></p></p> Tue, 17 Nov 2015 13:53:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/many-arab-cartoonists-have-responded-tragedy-paris-sense-shared-grief-113825 Dating app helps Muslim millennials find love, parents not included http://www.wbez.org/news/dating-app-helps-muslim-millennials-find-love-parents-not-included-113781 <p><div id="res454005967" previewtitle="Tariq and Ummehaany Azam dance to &quot;Fly Me to the Moon&quot; at their wedding reception."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Tariq and Ummehaany Azam dance to &quot;Fly Me to the Moon&quot; at their wedding reception." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/02/beautiful-dancers-15b631dbcb4c1443ff45387a00f62128ecad73d1-s700-c85.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="Tariq and Ummehaany Azam dance to &quot;Fly Me to the Moon&quot; at their wedding reception. (Courtesy of Tariq Azam)" /></div><div><div><p>Finding someone to spend your life with can be hard under any circumstances, but young observant Muslims will tell you that here in the U.S., it&#39;s doubly so. They have to navigate strict Islamic dating rules while interacting with the opposite gender in a Westernized world.</p><p>Now, a handful of young Muslims think that a new app called Ishqr provides a partial solution.</p></div></div></div><p>Humaira Mubeen is one of the many Muslim millennials who self-identifies as a &quot;Mipster,&quot; or Muslim hipster. &quot;I became part of this community called Mipsters. It was a bunch of proud Muslim Americans coming together talking about a lot of issues,&quot; says Mubeen. &quot;One of the topics of discussion was always trying to get married.&quot;</p><p>Apparently, it&#39;s hard to find someone who is not only compatible, but also shares a mix of Muslim and American values. Mubeen says, &quot;A year into being part of [the Mipster] community, I jokingly said, &#39;Why don&#39;t I make a website to connect all of you, because you all seem really cool?&#39; &quot;</p><p>Then the emails started pouring in with people asking where to sign up. Mubeen tried to explain that she had been joking, but eventually she felt compelled to build Ishqr, a website to help Muslims find each other. &quot;If Instagram and dating apps had a baby, it would be Ishqr,&quot; says Mubeen.</p><div id="res454245229"><aside aria-label="pullquote" role="complementary"><div><p>Finding someone to spend your life with can be hard under any circumstances, but young observant Muslims will tell you that here in the U.S., it&#39;s doubly so.</p></div></aside></div><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Capture_5.JPG" style="height: 258px; width: 310px; float: right; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" title="" /><em>Ishq&nbsp;</em>is an Arabic word for love, and the &quot;r&quot; was added at the end, Mubeen says, to make it sound more hip. More than 6,000 people have signed up on the Ishqr website since it went up just over a year ago. The app went live on iTunes in October.</p><p>Mubeen explains that when you sign up, Ishqr asks you for some basic information: a username, your religious preference (Shia, Sunni and &quot;Just Muslim, yo&quot; are all options) and why you&#39;ve decided to join. She says people sign up to make friends, test the waters and sometimes to get married.</p><p>Some users come in with the mentality that, &quot;If you don&#39;t want to get married in the next five months, let&#39;s not talk.&quot; Talking about marriage right up front might sound a little pushy, but it can work.</p><p>Tariq and Ummehaany Azam met on Ishqr. He&#39;s a medical resident, and she&#39;s a test development professional. Ummehaany described what led her to Ishqr: &quot;This is the first website for the Muslim community in which the person looking to meet someone is creating their own profile, and they are more involved in what goes into the profile and in talking about what they are looking for.&quot;</p><p>That&#39;s important, because on many Muslim online matchmaking sites, parents play matchmaker, and young people don&#39;t have much of a say. Tariq was on one of those more traditional sites for a couple of weeks. &quot;I actually received a phone call from some girl&#39;s mother,&quot; he says, &quot;being like, &#39;We saw your profile, we really like you.&#39; And I was completely shocked. ... That was way too much.&quot; He deleted his profile the next day.</p><p>Besides keeping parents out of the picture, Ishqr is different from other dating sites in another way: Photos aren&#39;t posted. As cliche as it sounds, it really is about discovering someone&#39;s personality. When he joined Ishqr, Tariq found Ummehaany&#39;s profile and asked her to read his. Evidently she liked what she saw: The two married this past May.</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2015/11/13/453988763/ishqr-helps-muslim-millenials-find-love-parents-not-included?ft=nprml&amp;f=453988763" target="_blank"><em> via NPR&#39;s Code Switch</em></a></p></p> Fri, 13 Nov 2015 13:03:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/dating-app-helps-muslim-millennials-find-love-parents-not-included-113781 Street artists hired by 'Homeland' hide accusations of show's racism in plain sight http://www.wbez.org/news/street-artists-hired-homeland-hide-accusations-shows-racism-plain-sight-113375 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Artists say they took jobs painting graffiti on the set of Homeland to leave subversive messages. They say this one reads, Homeland is racist.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res449047664" previewtitle="Artists say they took jobs painting graffiti on the set of Homeland to leave subversive messages. They say this one reads, &quot;Homeland is racist.&quot;"><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Artists say they took jobs painting graffiti on the set of Homeland to leave subversive messages. They say this one reads, &quot;Homeland is racist.&quot;" src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/15/arabianstreetartists9_wide-5000ce6e7c41182ce5599e11df15db12ade622d3-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 348px; width: 620px;" title="Artists say they took jobs painting graffiti on the set of Homeland to leave subversive messages. They say this one reads, &quot;Homeland is racist.&quot; (Courtesy of the artists)" /></div><div><p>&quot;Homeland is racist.&quot;</p></div></div><p>&quot;There is no Homeland.&quot;</p><p>&quot;Homeland is not a series.&quot;</p><p>For the observant Arabic speakers watching last Sunday&#39;s episode of&nbsp;Homeland,&nbsp;these are some of the messages they may have noticed scrawled on the walls behind main character Carrie Mathison. For the rest of the TV audience, well, they didn&#39;t have to wait long to find out.</p><p>On Thursday, the three artists hired to design the set of a Syrian refugee camp with Arabic graffiti&nbsp;<a href="http://www.hebaamin.com/news/">blogged</a>&nbsp;about &quot;hacking&quot; the show with subversive messages.</p><div id="res449047134" previewtitle="Artists hired to paint Arabic graffiti on sets for the TV show Homeland say this message reads, &quot;Homeland is not a series.&quot;"><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Artists hired to paint Arabic graffiti on sets for the TV show Homeland say this message reads, &quot;Homeland is not a series.&quot;" src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/15/arabianstreetartists1_wide-ced2369501363fa9ebd0448319a42ea7720a8ebc-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 349px; width: 620px;" title="Artists hired to paint Arabic graffiti on sets for the TV show Homeland say this message reads, &quot;Homeland is not a series.&quot; (Courtesy of the artists)" /></div><div><div><p>The &quot;Arabian Street Artists,&quot; as they refer to themselves in the post, are Heba Amin, Caram Kapp and Stone. They say they were initially reluctant to be a part of the show, because they see the show&#39;s portrayal of the Middle East and its people, particularly Muslims, as racist. But they decided to use the opportunity to make a statement.</p></div></div></div><p>And make a statement they did.</p><p>In the blog post revealing their actions, they wrote that they wanted to undercut the message of the show:</p><blockquote><div><p><em>&quot;The series has garnered the reputation of being&nbsp;<a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2014/10/02/homeland-is-the-most-bigoted-show-on-television/" target="_blank">the most bigoted show on television&nbsp;</a>for its inaccurate, undifferentiated and highly biased depiction of Arabs, Pakistanis, and Afghans, as well as its gross misrepresentations of the cities of Beirut, Islamabad- and the so-called Muslim world in general. For four seasons, and entering its fifth, Homeland has maintained the dichotomy of the photogenic, mainly white, mostly American protector versus the evil and backwards Muslim threat.&quot;</em></p></div></blockquote><div id="res449049207" previewtitle="Graffiti artists say this hidden-in-plain-sight insult says, &quot;Homeland is a watermelon,&quot; meaning it shouldn't be taken seriously."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Graffiti artists say this hidden-in-plain-sight insult says, &quot;Homeland is a watermelon,&quot; meaning it shouldn't be taken seriously." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/15/arabianstreetartists4_wide-100607570f4d928b8e2e3c8a73ae2677fe04c43a-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 349px; width: 620px;" title="Graffiti artists say this hidden-in-plain-sight insult says, &quot;Homeland is a watermelon,&quot; meaning it shouldn't be taken seriously. (Courtesy of the artists)" /></div><div><p>&nbsp;</p></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 16 Oct 2015 11:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/street-artists-hired-homeland-hide-accusations-shows-racism-plain-sight-113375 After 25-year hiatus, first Arabic-language "Sesame Street" opens again http://www.wbez.org/news/after-25-year-hiatus-first-arabic-language-sesame-street-opens-again-113071 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/iftah-muppets.png" alt="" /><p><div id="res438081246" previewtitle="Gargur, No'maan, Melsoon and Shams — four of the Muppet stars of Iftah Ya Simsim, the first Arabic-language version of Sesame Street. The show went off the air 25 years ago, and other Arabic-language Sesame Street spinoffs have launched since — but now, the original is debuting again."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Gargur, No'maan, Melsoon and Shams — four of the Muppet stars of Iftah Ya Simsim, the first Arabic-language version of Sesame Street. The show went off the air 25 years ago, and other Arabic-language Sesame Street spinoffs have launched since — but now, the original is debuting again." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/09/06/iftah-muppets_slide-3b18efa2a6c3b9e1252a7ec9159281fc19c2b185-s800-c85.png" style="height: 399px; width: 600px;" title="Gargur, No'maan, Melsoon and Shams — four of the Muppet stars of Iftah Ya Simsim, the first Arabic-language version of Sesame Street. The show went off the air 25 years ago, and other Arabic-language Sesame Street spinoffs have launched since — but now, the original is debuting again. (Courtesy of Sesame Workshop)" /></div><div><p>Iftah Ya Simsim, the Arabic-language version of Sesame Street, has re-debuted in the Middle East after a 25-year hiatus.</p></div></div><p>Cairo Arafat remembers watching the show with her younger siblings back in the 1980s.</p><p>&quot;If you were in Morocco, or in Egypt, or in Syria, and in all the countries throughout the Middle East, children were able to watch the show weekly, or even daily, as the show began to progress season after season,&quot; she explains.</p><p>When it launched in 1979,&nbsp;Iftah Ya Simsim&nbsp;(&quot;Open Sesame&quot;) was one of the earliest foreign language spinoffs of&nbsp;Sesame Street &mdash;&nbsp;and the first Arabic-language version. But the show&#39;s studio in Kuwait City was partially destroyed by fighting from the Gulf War, and&nbsp;Iftah Ya Simsim&nbsp;went off the air.</p><p>It stayed dark even as the Gulf War came to an end, and Western television shows took off.</p><p>Over the years, new shows came out that were popular with kids &mdash; but often they were Western programs, dubbed into Arabic or just subtitled.</p><p>&quot;Ten years ago there started to be a movement within the region as people began to ask, &#39;Well, what&#39;s happening to Arabic?&#39; &quot; Arafat says. &quot;There&#39;s been a really great emphasis on ensuring that our children can speak proper Arabic.&quot;</p><p>Nostalgia probably had a role too: many of the kids who grew up watching and learning Arabic from&nbsp;Iftah Ya Simsim&nbsp;are parents themselves.</p><p>It was clear to Cairo Arafat and others that the time was right for&nbsp;Iftah Ya Simsim&nbsp;to return. Her production company, Bidaya Media, is producing the new version from Abu Dhabi. The first episode premiered on Friday on ten stations around the Middle East and North Africa, and segments are being released on the show&#39;s&nbsp;<a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC48pfslXOUx-PZTLQxZjS4g">Youtube channel</a>.</p><p>Its opening is similar &mdash; the same theme song, still children playing &mdash; but now it&#39;s shot in high definition.</p><div id="res437829953"><div>&nbsp;</div><div style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YZhSGo8XzGs?rel=0" width="560"></iframe></div></div><p>But in the premiere, a sand storm has just hit, and the place is a dusty mess. The Muppet Gargur &mdash; or as Western audiences may know him, Grover &mdash; comes to help the children clean, and everyone learns a lesson about recycling.</p><p>There are plenty of elements unique to&nbsp;Iftah, including its two local human stars and No&#39;maan, the huge friendly camel that lumbers around the set. But American viewers would see a lot that they recognize. There&#39;s Elmo, Ernie and Bert &mdash; and a Cookie Monster who doesn&#39;t love cookies, but biscuits.</p><p>&quot;He loves the date biscuits,&quot; Arafat explains. &quot;Dates are common here, so he&#39;s into the date biscuits.&quot;</p><p>She says that the differences between the two shows aren&#39;t what&#39;s important.</p><p>&quot;Children are curious. They want to feel loved,&quot; she says. &quot;They want to learn new things. They want to see funny things. They love music.</p><p>&quot;I think those are the things that unify children across all countries,&quot; she says.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/09/06/437821382/after-25-year-hiatus-first-arabic-language-sesame-street-opens-again?ft=nprml&amp;f=437821382" target="_blank"><em> via NPR</em></a></p></p> Fri, 25 Sep 2015 16:09:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/after-25-year-hiatus-first-arabic-language-sesame-street-opens-again-113071 Worldview 9.1.11 http://www.wbez.org/episode/worldview-9111 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//episode/images/2011-september/2011-09-01/fta2.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>After the August recess ends next week, Congress plans to vote on new free trade agreements with South Korea, Panama and Colombia. We’ll sift through the facts and myths of free trade agreements with Laura Carlsen, director of the <a href="http://www.cipamericas.org/" target="_blank">Americas Program at the Center for International Policy</a> in Mexico City. Also, WBEZ’s South Side Bureau Reporter Natalie Moore reports on a South Side public school that wants to create an Arabic language and culture center. And on <em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/globalactivism" target="_blank">Global Activism</a></em>, we speak with <a href="http://www.jesuits-chgdet.org/">Jesuit</a> priest Father Terry Charlton, founder of <a href="http://www.sagnairobi.org/">St. Aloysius Gonzaga</a> High School in the Kibera slums of Nairobi, Kenya. This massive squatter community is home to nearly one million people, including more than 30,000 children who are orphans of the AIDS epidemic.</p></p> Thu, 01 Sep 2011 14:26:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode/worldview-9111 Writer Karen Brenner sees friendship in Chicago's melting pot http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-30/writer-karen-brenner-sees-friendship-chicagos-melting-pot-91237 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//segment/photo/2011-August/2011-08-30/4981347986_bcb5cf89c2_b.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><audio class="mejs mediaelement-formatter-identified-1332483678-1" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/sites/default/files/neighbors essay.mp3">&nbsp;</audio></p><p>Writer Karen Brenner no doubt heard Arabic and many other languages in her Northwest Side neighborhood. Everyday, her neighbors remind her that Chicago is the ultimate melting pot. She shared notes on her neighbors on <em>Eight Forty-Eight</em>.</p><p>Two very different families live next door to us on our street of two flats. One family has a young daughter with hair the color of the sun; hair that streams across her face so that she is constantly pushing it out of her eyes and mouth. Upstairs lives her best friend, who has hair the color of night; hair that hangs down past her knees when it is not gathered into a long, thick, braided rope.</p><p>During the bitter winter months we barely see them. Now that it is summer, they are constantly out of doors, riding their bikes, or playing in the little garden that their families share.</p><p>The girl with the dark hair has a large family. They have planted strawberries and tomatoes in their side of the yard. We give them some of our bean plants; they give us a kabob hot off the grill, dusky with spices. Her family cooks out almost every night, accompanied by smoke and laughter.</p><p>The girl with the blond hair has only one little brother. Her family gives us pirogues, fat with sweet, mild cheese or pillowed with potatoes. We give them bouquets of roses. To both families we smile and nod over the fence to say, “as-salamu alaykum” or “dzien dobry."&nbsp; Those are the only words we can speak to our neighbors.</p><p>But the little girls switch effortlessly from one language to the other. When their mothers call them, they answer back--without missing a beat--in the staccato of Arabic, or tongue-twisting Polish. Then they turn to each other and continue their conversation in the broad, flattened-A of Midwestern American English.</p><p>They call to us as they fly by on their bikes--best friends; bold adventurers. Their hair streams out behind them--one the color of sun; one the color of night. They wave and shout, “Hello neighbors!”&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>We wave back, smiling, watching what is special and wonderful about America ride by.&nbsp; Here, in this great city, in this good land, there is a child of the Middle East and a child of Europe who daily cross the cultural chasms of religion, world view and language with complete ease and grace. As we watch their bikes disappear into the distance we know that they carry with them the promise of our country and the legacy of our city; the world comes here and becomes our neighbors, and sometimes our best friend.</p><p><em>Music Button: Second Sky, "Hourglass", from the album The Art of Influence, (Rhythm &amp; Culture)</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 30 Aug 2011 14:37:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-30/writer-karen-brenner-sees-friendship-chicagos-melting-pot-91237 Global Notes: Eclectic New York outfit finds the funk in Arabic music http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-07-13/global-notes-eclectic-new-york-outfit-finds-funk-arabic-music-89092 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//segment/photo/2011-July/2011-07-13/ShusmoMumtastic.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>On this week’s <a href="http://www.wbez.org/globalnotes"><em>Global Notes</em></a>, Jerome and <a href="http://www.wbez.org/radio-m"><em>Radio M</em></a> host Tony Sarabia listen to the new album, <em><a href="http://www.shusmo.com/Albums.html" target="_blank">Mumtastic</a></em>, by the eclectic New York outfit <a href="http://www.shusmo.com/Home.html" target="_blank">Tareq Abboushi &amp; Shusmo</a>. Tony calls them a sonic "United Nations," making Arabic music out of funk and vice versa.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Track List</strong></p><p>1. Longa Nakreez</p><p>2. Georgina</p><p>3. The Wall</p><p>4. Rasty George</p><p>5. Reprise 2</p><p>6. Dal'ona</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Watch a live performance of "Apologies to Brahms" from <em>Mumtastic</em></strong></p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ROAvpxt0EJc" width="560" frameborder="0" height="349"></iframe></p></p> Wed, 13 Jul 2011 16:17:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-07-13/global-notes-eclectic-new-york-outfit-finds-funk-arabic-music-89092