WBEZ | Chinatown http://www.wbez.org/tags/chinatown Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Greek austerity update, 'Only God Forgives' reviewed and a world music festival http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-19/greek-austerity-update-only-god-forgives-reviewed-and-world-music <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP57034231517.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We get an update on Greek austerity measures. Milos Stehlik reviews the French-Danish film &#39;Only God Forgives.&#39; Nari Safavi helps listeners plan a weekend full of international flair.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F101763523&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-only-god-forgives-reviewed-and-internati.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-only-god-forgives-reviewed-and-internati" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Greek austerity update, 'Only God Forgives' reviewed and a world music festival" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Fri, 19 Jul 2013 11:55:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-19/greek-austerity-update-only-god-forgives-reviewed-and-world-music Loss of Red Line service brings changes to Chinatown http://www.wbez.org/news/loss-red-line-service-brings-changes-chinatown-107365 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/chinatown.jpg" title="Near the CTA Red Line stop at Cermak-Chinatown. Workers were out on the tracks Friday getting started on a massive reconstruction project. (WBEZ/Lewis Wallace)" /></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F93713993&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Some business owners are worried about a slow summer near the Cermak-Chinatown Red Line stop, but expanded water taxi service may pick up some of the slack. Nine south side stations are closed until October for reconstruction.</p><p>Just down the street from the Chinatown Red Line, Michelle Zhang was ringing up a steady stream of newspapers and lottery tickets in her gift shop. But she said she&rsquo;s concerned about the Red Line.</p><p>&ldquo;I think it&rsquo;s no good for the business,&rdquo; she said. The street was hopping with locals getting groceries, tea and pastries -- it&rsquo;s tourist shoppers that may be more of a concern. In another gift shop, Yat Wong agrees.</p><p>&ldquo;I think it will affect me a lot since the station is closed for more than 5 months, I guess, but nothing I can do,&rdquo; he said. And he says his daughter&rsquo;s been rerouted to school, as have other kids he knows. &ldquo;Almost affect everyone in Chinatown, I guess. Every family.&rdquo;</p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F94308827"></iframe><p>Starting Tuesday, commuters looking for an alternate to the Red Line have a new way to travel between Chinatown and downtown: a water taxi. The Chinatown taxi has operated on weekends since 2009, and this year they&rsquo;ve added a new black and yellow boat to the fleet that will be used to provide weekday service.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s a great alternative if for no reason other than it&rsquo;s more fun and scenic,&rdquo; said Andrew Sargis, Chief of Operations of the Chicago Water Taxi, which is a private subsidiary of Wendella Sightseeing.</p><p>A boat will depart from Ping Tom Memorial Park every twenty minutes from 10am to 9pm, and tickets are $4 one way. The ride to near Union Station is about 12 to 15 minutes, and a transfer can get you further north or east along the Chicago River.</p><p>But total travel time depends on traffic.</p><p>&ldquo;We can get barge traffic, we can get kayakers, we can get other commercial boat traffic,&rdquo; said Sargis, adding that on the weekends, sailboats can also be trouble.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.15;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;margin-left: -36pt;margin-right: -36pt;"><em><b id="docs-internal-guid-23161088-d872-17fe-5060-74fbae141146" style="font-weight:normal;"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Lew</span></b>is Wallace is a Pritzker Journalism Fellow at WBEZ. Follow him <a href="http://twitter.com/lewispants">@lewispants</a>.</em></p><div>&nbsp;</div><br /></p> Sat, 25 May 2013 06:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/loss-red-line-service-brings-changes-chinatown-107365 Comfort me with minced beef and egg over rice http://www.wbez.org/blogs/louisa-chu/2012-12/comfort-me-minced-beef-and-egg-over-rice-104435 <p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/louisachu/8283017513/"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/mincedbeefgourmet.jpg" style="height: 412px; width: 620px;" title=" Minced beef with egg over rice at May May Gourmet Food Inc. in Chicago's Chinatown (WBEZ/Louisa Chu)" /></a></p><p>Sometimes, all we can do is turn to comfort food &mdash; but what and why?</p><p>According to University of Illinois researcher Brian Wansink, best known as the author of <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0553804340?ie=UTF8&amp;creativeASIN=0553804340&amp;tag=lklchu-20"><em>Mindless Eating</em></a>, our preferences differ across gender and age.&nbsp;&quot;Males preferred warm, hearty, meal-related comfort foods (such as steak, casseroles, and soup), while females instead preferred comfort foods that were more snack related (such as chocolate and ice cream). In addition, younger people preferred more snack-related comfort foods compared to those over 55 years of age,&quot;&nbsp;Wansink and his team wrote in <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031938403002038"><em>Physiology &amp; Behavior</em></a>.&nbsp;</p><p>&quot;Men prefer the more &#39;meal&ndash;type&#39; items because this gave them a feeling of being &#39;spoiled&#39; or &#39;taken care of&#39;, whereas those same foods reminded women of all the work that went into preparing the meal,&quot; according to&nbsp;<a href="http://foodpsychology.cornell.edu/outreach/comfort-food.html">Cornell&#39;s Food and Brand Lab</a>, where Wansink now serves as director.</p><p>Me? I do reach for chocolate first. But then, more often than not, I crave a curiously named dish: minced beef and egg over rice.&nbsp;</p><p>It is, in fact, what we now know as ground beef, but its &quot;minced beef&quot; moniker is an etymological clue to its British colonial history, suggesting its place among a treasure trove of Hong Kong diner-style classics.</p><p>I haven&#39;t been able to trace the full origins of this particular dish yet, but I do remember it first appeared in Chicago in the 1980s&nbsp;at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.maymaygourmet.com/">May May Gourmet Food Inc.</a>&nbsp;in Chinatown, along with the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_American_history#Third_wave_.281980s_to_today.29">third major wave</a> of Chinese-American immigration. The owners and cooks may have changed over the years, but the core menu has stayed the same.</p><p>I&#39;m not sure what the comfort food study says about me, but while minced beef and egg is easy enough to make at home, and there are a lot of good looking recipes online, I do prefer to order it out.&nbsp;My current favorite version &mdash; where the egg is actually optional, fried or raw &mdash; can be found next door to May May at relative newcomer <a href="http://www.go4foodusa.com/G4F-v3.0/G4F/Home.aspx">Go 4 Food</a>. (Please note they&#39;re closed on Tuesdays.) But you can find the dish elsewhere, too, now that you know its secret name.</p><p>And with that, I hope you too find comfort.</p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/agashi/5035348340/"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/mincedbeefgo4food.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="Minced beef with raw nest egg over rice at Go 4 Food in Chicago's Chinatown (flickr/agashi)" /></a></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></p> Tue, 18 Dec 2012 10:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/louisa-chu/2012-12/comfort-me-minced-beef-and-egg-over-rice-104435 Elderly expect brunt of postal closures http://www.wbez.org/story/elderly-expect-brunt-postal-closures-94620 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-December/2011-12-05/photo.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The U.S. Postal Service announced that during the busy holidays it will take a break from a controversial plan to close post offices, but the issue is still stewing in some neighborhoods - especially among elderly residents.</p><p>Eleven post offices in Chicago are on the list of potential closures, nearly all on the city’s South and West Sides. Those are the communities where many say that older residents will bear the brunt of the hardship of having to travel farther to use a full-service postal facility.</p><p>Residents near those locations received letters over the summer notifying them of the proposal to close their local post office, and inviting comments. Dorothy Sumpter, a 73-year-old resident of the North Lawndale neighborhood, said as soon as she received the letter, she put the date of a public town hall meeting on the proposal on her calendar.</p><p>“People like me need the post office,” said Sumpter, “so that’s why I wanted to be in on it. I’m a citizen and I use every right that I possibly can.”</p><p>Sumpter uses the Otis Grant Collins Post Office, where revenue dropped $200,000 between fiscal years 2007 and 2010. Throughout the nation, post offices are seeing a decline in revenues and foot traffic, attributed to the shift to online bill-paying and correspondence. But Sumpter says she and many other elderly people like her aren’t part of the internet-using trend.</p><p>“I don’t feel comfortable using it,” she said. “I’m old-fashioned.”</p><p>Sumpter goes to the post office every week because she has a P.O. Box there, but also to buy stamps and mail her bills. She said she feels comfortable going there because it’s easy to access on foot and by bus, and she knows all the workers by name. If the Otis Grant Collins branch closes, the next closest post office would be in Cicero. “Which I don’t even know where the post office is in Cicero,” Sumpter laughed. “And I don’t really want to have to go over there just to go to a post office, because many times I can walk to the post office in less than 15 minutes.”</p><p>Sumpter said she fears that the elderly will become more isolated if they lose their neighborhood post offices, because many are less mobile to begin with, and sometimes walking to the post office is a crucial part of their social interaction and weekly exercise regime. Karen Schenck, Chicago District Manager/Postmaster, said many share Sumpter’s view.</p><p>“That was the largest concern. If you had to ask me what was the biggest concern of all the town hall meetings,” said Schenck, “was people were concerned about the elderly in their own community.”</p><p>The list of proposed closures came from USPS headquarters in Washington, D.C., said Schenck.</p><p>“Nobody took into consideration any other fact except for how much revenue,” she explained, “and if there was another post office within two miles close to it that could service the community.”</p><p>Schenck says the district office is now looking at population data to see how many elderly live near the post offices that may close. She says that’ll help them make a final decision. Schenck says of the 11 offices on the shortlist, some will be spared.</p><p>But concern for the elderly may be loudest in Chicago’s Chinatown. Of the zip codes where offices may close, Chinatown’s is the one with the greatest portion of residents over age 65, with several senior housing high rises in the immediate vicinity of the post office. Chinatown’s elderly also say they have an unique need - a place where people are bilingual.</p><p>“The employees, they don’t speak Chinese,” said 60-year old Harry Wong.</p><p>Wong is like many elderly Chinese immigrants in Chicago who speak limited English. He uses the Chinatown post office because if there’s a language barrier, he can turn to other customers in the store for help translating. That’s the reason that many elderly Chinese who live in other places will often bypass a closer post office to go to Chinatown’s.</p><p>Chinatown organizers have gathered hundreds of handwritten letters from residents to protest the potential closure of their post office. USPS is still accepting those comments, and says no post offices will close before March.</p></p> Tue, 06 Dec 2011 23:17:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/elderly-expect-brunt-postal-closures-94620 Chicago post offices facing potential closures and service cuts http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-09-21/chicago-post-offices-facing-potential-closures-and-service-cuts-92256 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-September/2011-09-21/Post Office.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The <a href="http://www.usps.com/" target="_blank">U.S. Postal Service</a> clearly faced a severe cash flow problem - what wasn’t so clear was how to solve it. In an effort to reduce costs, more than 3,000 post offices have been considered for closure nationwide, including 14 in and around Chicago. But <em>Eight Forty-Eight</em> wondered how the public felt about the potential plans. To find out, <em>Eight Forty-Eight</em> visited two of the post offices targeted for closure: the <a href="http://usps.whitepages.com/service/post_office/haymarket-postal-store-168-n-clinton-st-chicago-il-1366551" target="_blank">Haymarket </a>station at Clinton and Lake streets and the <a href="http://usps.whitepages.com/service/post_office/chinatown-postal-store-2345-s-wentworth-ave-ste-a-chicago-il-1357957" target="_blank">Chinatown</a> station.</p><p>Then, for more details from within the U.S. Postal Service, host Alison Cuddy was joined by Mark Reynolds, the Chicago District spokesperson for <a href="http://www.usps.com/" target="_blank">USPS</a>, and Mack Julion<strong>, </strong>president of the <a href="http://nalcbr11.org/" target="_blank">National Association of Letter Carriers’ Branch 11</a> in Chicago.</p><p><em>Music Button: Pablo Sanches feat. Colonel Red, "Release da Freak", from the CDX Nickodemus Presents: Turntables on the Hudson Vol. 8, (ESL)</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 21 Sep 2011 13:25:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-09-21/chicago-post-offices-facing-potential-closures-and-service-cuts-92256 Solis hangs on in 25th after power plant flip-flop http://www.wbez.org/story/25th-ward/solis-hangs-25th-after-power-plant-flip-flop-84808 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-April/2011-04-06/1Solis.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago Ald. Danny Solis hung on in his 25th Ward runoff Tuesday. But the defeated candidate says he too has reason to celebrate.<br> <br> Solis did not support a proposal for the city to regulate emissions from coal-fired power plants — he didn't, that is, until he fell short in the election’s first round and landed in the runoff.<br> <br> Solis says he needed to get in tune with constituents upset about the Fisk Generating Station, a coal-fired plant in Pilsen, a largely Mexican neighborhood in the ward. The flip-flop seems to have sealed his reelection.<br> <br> “I am committed to passing the Clean [Power] Ordinance in the city of Chicago,” Solis told his supporters Tuesday night after winning about 54 percent of the runoff vote.<br> <br> The losing candidate, Cuahutémoc Morfin, took credit: “We made him come to the right side of the issue in the environmental issue, which is the coal plant here, which pollutes the air that we breathe.”<br> <br> With Solis behind the power-plant proposal, it has a better chance of passing the City Council.</p></p> Wed, 06 Apr 2011 08:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/25th-ward/solis-hangs-25th-after-power-plant-flip-flop-84808 As Illinois redistricting begins, public gets say http://www.wbez.org/story/chinatown/illinois-redistricting-begins-public-gets-say-84382 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-March/2011-03-28/IMG_0008.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Illinois state senators are hearing from Chicago area residents who want a say in redistricting, the once-a-decade, highly contentious and political process that determines boundaries for legislative districts. It is about power and influence, and on Monday afternoon dozens of people showed up to tell senators how they want the boundaries drawn.<br /> <br /> Kyle Hillman lives in Chicago's Rogers Park neighborhood, and said the community is a poor fit for its current district.<br /> <br /> &quot;There's a high crime rate and it has one of the largest food kitchens in the metro area, and yet it is included in a district that is mostly consisting of lakefront homes in Evanston in New Trier,&quot; Hillman told the Senate Redistricting Committee.<br /> <br /> Others complained their neighborhoods span several districts, watering down the community's influence.<br /> <br /> &quot;The greater Chinatown community area is a vibrant and cohesive community. Its interests are not served by being split into multiple districts, as it is currently,&quot; said Bernie Wong of the Chinese American Service League.</p><p>C. Betty Magness with the group IVI-IPO urged the senators to ignore politicians' addresses when they draft the boundaries.<br /><br />&quot;Districts should not be drawn to favor or discriminate against incumbents, candidates or parties,&quot; Magness said.<br /><br />Another issue that came up Monday has to do with the addresses of prisoners. Right now, they are counted as residents where they are incarcerated, which is most often downstate.<br /><br />&quot;Prisoners should be counted where they originate from, instead of where they're currently housed,&quot; testified Lawrence Hill with the Cook County Bar Association.<br /><br />The Illinois House could actually vote to make that change as early as Tuesday, according to the bill's sponsor, state Rep. LaShawn Ford. But the Chicago Democrat said it would not take effect until the next redistricting - ten years from now.</p><p>Monday's hearing was the first of <a href="http://ilsenateredistricting.com/index.php?option=com_content&amp;view=article&amp;id=78&amp;Itemid=117">at least five public forums</a> for the Senate committee. Lawmakers have until the end of June to approve a new legislative map, or the process will be put in the hands of a <a href="http://www.ilga.gov/commission/lrb/con4.htm">special commission</a>.</p></p> Mon, 28 Mar 2011 21:04:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/chinatown/illinois-redistricting-begins-public-gets-say-84382 Illinois law aims to protect minority voter rights http://www.wbez.org/story/cw-chan/illinois-law-aims-protect-minority-voter-rights <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/quinn 001.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Minority group advocates say Illinois took a big step Monday toward protecting their political voices with the signing of the Illinois Voting Rights Act of 2011.</p><p>&ldquo;The rules in the districts are gerrymandered so they are rigged against anyone who may have a group in a particular area,&rdquo; said Governor Pat Quinn at the bill signing in Chicago&rsquo;s Chinatown. &ldquo;One of the purposes of the law is to make sure our racial minorities, our language minorities, our citizens who live in a particular area, get a fair chance to elect the person of their choice.&rdquo;</p><p>The law was introduced by State Sen. Kwame Raoul, D-Chicago, after both Republicans and Democrats failed to rewrite the laws that govern legislative redistricting. Both parties proposed competing amendments to the state constitution to avoid what happened the last three times the lines were drawn: partisan deadlocks forced legislators to choose either a Democrat or a Republican from a hat, literally, and the winner drew the map.</p><p>Chinatown community leaders praised the new law, which they had lobbied for in Springfield. C.W. Chan of the Coalition for a Better Chinese American Community, said when Illinois redistricted in the past, Chinatown became a textbook case of how concentrated minority populations could be marginalized.</p><p>&ldquo;Despite meeting all criteria for inclusion in a single district, like compactness, contiguity, and being a community of interest,&rdquo; said Chan, &ldquo;we are nevertheless not protected by any law as we do not have the magic number of the voting age majority.&rdquo;</p><p>Chan hopes the new law will help Chinese-Americans on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side fall into fewer legislative and representative districts. Currently, they are divided between four wards, four state representative districts, three state senate districts, and three Congressional districts. Community leaders say that has made it difficult to lobby for the government services and resources that their immigrant community needs.</p><div style="background-color: transparent; ">&nbsp;</div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 07 Mar 2011 23:55:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/cw-chan/illinois-law-aims-protect-minority-voter-rights West Side Aldermanic Races http://www.wbez.org/story/12th-ward/west-side-aldermanic-races <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/1_morfin_6.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><em>Updated At: 10:40 p.m.&nbsp; </em>New numbers from West Side wards, where runoffs seem likely in the 24th, 25th, 36th and 38th wards.</p><p><strong>Alderman Ward 12</strong></p><p>24 of 24 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>George Cardenas, (i) 2,680 - 55 percent</p><p>Jose Guereca, 911 - 19 percent</p><p>Jesse Iñiguez, 796 - 16 percent</p><p>Alberto Bocanegra, 321 - 7 percent</p><p>Maria Ortiz, 137 - 3 percent</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Alderman Ward 21</strong></p><p>70 of 74 precincts - 95 percent</p><p>Howard Brookins, (i) 8,004 - 56 percent</p><p>Sheldon Sherman, 2,797 - 19 percent</p><p>Patricia Foster, 1,706 - 12 percent</p><p>Sylvia Jones, 1,537 - 11 percent</p><p>Jerome Maddox, 309 - 2 percent</p><p><br /><strong>Alderman Ward 22</strong></p><p>29 of 29 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Ricardo Munoz, (i) 2,793 - 65 percent</p><p>Neftalie Gonzalez, 1,536 - 35 percent</p><p><br /><strong>Alderman Ward 23</strong></p><p>54 of 54 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Michael Zalewski, (i) 8,581 - 53 percent</p><p>Anna Goral, 5,511 - 34 percent</p><p>Chuck Maida, 2,231 - 14 percent</p><p><br /><strong>Alderman Ward 24</strong></p><p>56 of 56 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Sharon Dixon, (i) 1,783 - 20 percent</p><p>Michael Chandler, 1,197 - 13 percent</p><p>Vetress Boyce, 841 - 9 percent</p><p>Valerie Leonard, 697 - 8 percent</p><p>Shavonda Fields, 606 - 7 percent</p><p>Chauncey Stroud, 605 - 7 percent</p><p>Julius Anderson, 482 - 5 percent</p><p>Wallace Johnson, 477 - 5 percent</p><p>Wilbert Cook, 459 - 5 percent</p><p>Sondra Spellman, 435 - 5 percent</p><p>Melissa Williams, 369 - 4 percent</p><p>Frank Bass, 346 - 4 percent</p><p>Regina Lewis, 309 - 3 percent</p><p>Jeffery Turner, 203 - 2 percent</p><p>Donielle Lawson, 137 - 1 percent</p><p>Larry Nelson, 113 - 1 percent</p><p>Mark Carter, 44 - 0 percent</p><p>Jimmy Lee Lard, 37 - 0 percent</p><p><br /><strong>Alderman Ward 25</strong></p><p>31 of 31 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Danny Solis, (i) 4,291 - 49 percent</p><p>Cuahutemoc Morfin, 2,451 - 28 percent</p><p>Ambrosio Medrano, 2,025 - 23 percent</p><p><br /><strong>Alderman Ward 26</strong></p><p>61 of 63 precincts - 97 percent</p><p>Roberto Maldonado, (i) 5,885 - 82 percent</p><p>Devon Reid, 1,263 - 18 percent</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Alderman Ward 27</strong></p><p>59 of 59 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Walter Burnett, (i) 6,606 - 71 percent</p><p>Tom Courtney, 2,056 - 22 percent</p><p>Gevonna Fassett, 655 - 7 percent</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Alderman Ward 28</strong></p><p>60 of 61 precincts - 98 percent</p><p>Jason Ervin, (i) 5,557 - 85 percent</p><p>William Siegmund, 1,007 - 15 percent</p><p><strong><br />Alderman Ward 29</strong></p><p>44 of 49 precincts - 90 percent</p><p>Deborah Graham, (i) 4,884 - 52 percent</p><p>Thomas Simmons, 1,147 - 12 percent</p><p>C B Johnson, 1,075 - 11 percent</p><p>Mary Russell Gardner, 899 - 10 percent</p><p>Jill Bush, 636 - 7 percent</p><p>Beverly Rogers, 299 - 3 percent</p><p>Roman Morrow, 279 - 3 percent</p><p>Oddis Johnson, 168 - 2 percent</p><p><strong><br />Alderman Ward 30</strong></p><p>40 of 41 precincts - 98 percent</p><p>Ariel Reboyras, (i) 4,506 - 75 percent</p><p>Stella Nicpon, 595 - 10 percent</p><p>Chester Hornowski, 526 - 9 percent</p><p>Doug Cannon, 368 - 6 percent</p><p><strong><br />Alderman Ward 32</strong></p><p>52 of 52 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Scott Waguespack, (i) 8,704 - 66 percent</p><p>David Pavlik, 2,290 - 17 percent</p><p>Bryan Lynch, 1,465 - 11 percent</p><p>Brian Gorman, 770 - 6 percent</p><p><strong><br />Alderman Ward 34</strong></p><p>61 of 61 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Carrie Austin, (i) 9,170 - 65 percent</p><p>Henry Moses, 2,123 - 15 percent</p><p>Shirley White, 1,533 - 11 percent</p><p>Burl McQueen, 659 - 5 percent</p><p>Michael Mayden, 618 - 4 percent</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Alderman Ward 35</strong></p><p>36 of 36 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Rey Colon, (i) 4,451 - 51 percent</p><p>Miguel Sotomayor, 2,174 - 25 percent</p><p>Nancy Schiavone, 2,117 - 24 percent</p><p><strong><br />Alderman Ward 36</strong></p><p>55 of 55 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>John Rice, (i) 6,709 - 48 percent</p><p>Nicholas Sposato, 3,346 - 24 percent</p><p>Jodi Biancalana, 1,964 - 14 percent</p><p>Brian Murphy, 656 - 5 percent</p><p>Thomas Motzny, 650 - 5 percent</p><p>Bruce Randazzo, 628 - 5 percent</p><p><strong><br />Alderman Ward 37</strong></p><p>40 of 43 precincts - 93 percent</p><p>Emma Mitts, (i) 4,779 - 58 percent</p><p>Maretta Brown-Miller, 1,982 - 24 percent</p><p>Shanika Finley, 390 - 5 percent</p><p>Minerva Orozco, 389 - 5 percent</p><p>Steven Pleasant, 332 - 4 percent</p><p>Tommy Abina, 328 - 4 percent</p><p><strong><br />Alderman Ward 38</strong></p><p>53 of 53 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Timothy Cullerton, (i) 5,795 - 48 percent</p><p>Tom Caravette, 2,699 - 22 percent</p><p>Bart Goldberg, 945 - 8 percent</p><p>Carmen Hernandez, 723 - 6 percent</p><p>Mahmoud Bambouyani, 704 - 6 percent</p><p>Sheryl Morabito, 672 - 6 percent</p><p>John Videckis, 402 - 3 percent</p><p>Ed Quartullo, 237 - 2 percent</p><p><br /><strong>Alderman Ward 39</strong></p><p>47 of 47 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Margaret Laurino, (i) 7,735 - 76 percent</p><p>Mary Hunter, 2,392 - 24 percent</p><p><em>Updated At 9:38 p.m</em>. Incumbent 25th Ward Ald. Danny Solis will likely face a runoff to defend his seat. &nbsp;He won 49% of the vote with all precincts reporting.</p><p><em>Updated At: 8:55 p.m</em>.&nbsp; Incumbent 24th Ward Ald. Sharon Dixon is leading a tight race that is headed towards a runoff. With 96 percent of precincts reporting, Dixon has a slight edge over her closest competitor Michael Chandler.<strong><br /></strong></p><p>Here's a look at some of the races WBEZ is focusing on:</p><p><strong>12th Ward</strong><br />&nbsp;<br />Ald. George Cárdenas&rsquo; campaign staffers predicted a victory without a runoff, but the two-term incumbent looked nervous. During this month&rsquo;s blizzard cleanup, Cárdenas spent thousands of campaign dollars to bring in snow plows. He festooned them with reelection placards.<br />&nbsp;<br />This Southwest Side ward, mostly Latino, covers parts of Brighton Park, McKinley Park, Back of the Yards and Little Village. It&rsquo;s struggling with overcrowded housing, foreclosure filings, struggling schools and rising crime.<br />&nbsp;<br />Cárdenas won his first aldermanic election in 2003 with help from the Hispanic Democratic Organization, a roving campaign army that eventually dissolved amid a federal probe into patronage hiring by Mayor Daley&rsquo;s administration. Cárdenas won his 2007 reelection handily.<br />&nbsp;<br />But this year&rsquo;s race was tougher. The strongest of four challengers appeared to be Streets and Sanitation worker José Guereca, a former Army soldier who received tens of thousands of campaign dollars from State Sen. Tony Muñoz, the ward&rsquo;s Democratic boss. Muñoz, a former Cárdenas ally, was a fellow HDO beneficiary. Guereca also got support from Teamsters Local 700 and the Chicago Firefighters Union.<br />&nbsp;<br />Another tough challenger was coffee-shop owner Jesús &ldquo;Jesse&rdquo; Iñiguez, head of the United Southwest Chamber of Commerce who ran poorly against Cárdenas four years ago. This time he got help from Ald. Ricardo Muñoz (22nd Ward) and County Board Commissioner Jesús &ldquo;Chuy&rdquo; García (7th District), making the race a skirmish in a decades-old war between Southwest Side progressives and regular Democrats. Other important support came from the Service Employees International Union. Iñiguez campaign staffers predicted they would advance to the runoff as Cárdenas and Guereca competed for the same machine voters.<br />&nbsp;<br />But Iñiguez himself lost some votes to the Green Party&rsquo;s Alberto Bocanegra Jr., who raised a lot of money for the race. Bocanegra had backing from water district commissioner Frank Avila and immigrant rights organizer Jorge Mújica.<br />&nbsp;<br />Also on the ballot was María &ldquo;Chula&rdquo; Ortiz, a suburban bus employee with little money or visibility.<br />&nbsp;<br /><strong>24th Ward</strong><br />&nbsp;<br />Ald. Sharon Denise Dixon struggled to build a strong political organization after narrowly winning her seat in a 2007 runoff. When Chicago police officers arrested her on drunken-driving charges in 2009, some residents of her ward smelled blood. Seventeen got on the ballot to challenge her, making the contest the most crowded of any Chicago ward race in two decades.<br />&nbsp;<br />A judge determined the officers had no probable cause to arrest Dixon and, last month, she filed suit against three of the cops, saying they wrongly accused her. These developments didn&rsquo;t seem to give her big boosts. The mostly African American ward, which includes North Lawndale and parts of other West Side neighborhoods, is struggling with poverty, abandoned lots, unemployment and low high-school graduation rates.<br />&nbsp;<br />Three challengers seemed to have the most support or credibility. One, Ald. Michael Chandler, lost his seat to Dixon despite support from Mayor Daley. In the rematch, Dixon said Chandler ran straw candidates to help force her into a runoff. Chandler denied that accusation. Another strong challenger appeared to be Melissa Williams, a real-estate attorney who has worked for neighborhood housing groups and ex-offenders. She had backing from State Sen. Rickey Hendon. The third was Valerie Leonard, who uses her finance background to help social-service agencies gather government funding. She founded Lawndale Alliance, a community group focused on affordable housing, community development and quality schools.<br />&nbsp;<br />Several other candidates also seemed to have a decent shot: Wallace &ldquo;Mickey&rdquo; Johnson, a former NBA player and former Cook County sheriff&rsquo;s deputy who has a West Side business; Wilbert Cook III, who heads a nonprofit that works to reintegrate ex-offenders into the job market; Chauncey Stroud, who once served as chief of staff for former Ald. Jesse Miller (24th); Donielle Lawson, a Cook County Jail teacher and union delegate; and Frank Bass, who lobbied in Springfield for John Stroger, the late Cook County Board president.<br />&nbsp;<br />The weakest candidates seemed to be Martavius &ldquo;Mark&rdquo; Carter, Sondra &ldquo;Sam&rdquo; Spellman, Vetress Boyce, Julius Anderson, Shavonda Fields, Jimmy Lee Lard, Regina Lewis, Jeffery Turner and Larry Nelson.<br />&nbsp;<br /><strong>25th Ward</strong><br />&nbsp;<br />Ald. Daniel &ldquo;Danny&rdquo; Solís has been Mayor&rsquo;s Daley&rsquo;s closest Latino ally on the City Council for years. In 2007, nevertheless, Solís barely avoided a runoff. This year the incumbent seemed to have an even tougher race.<br />&nbsp;<br />Daley appointed Solís to the seat in 1996 to replace Ald. Ambrosio Medrano, who pleaded guilty in the Operation Silver Shovel scandal and served more than two years in federal prison. Solís was a player in the Hispanic Democratic Organization, Daley&rsquo;s most powerful campaign army until federal authorities started looking into City Hall patronage hiring. Solís also co-founded the United Neighborhood Organization, a group that now runs charter schools.<br />&nbsp;<br />Solís now chairs the council&rsquo;s powerful Zoning Committee. In that post, he helped broker a deal last year that could lead to several new Walmart stores in Chicago.<br />&nbsp;<br />Solís helped open gates to development and gentrification, which angered some residents of Pilsen, one of Chicago&rsquo;s oldest Mexican neighborhoods. The ward also includes Tri-Taylor, Chinatown, and an area near the University of Illinois at Chicago.<br />&nbsp;<br />Solís also took shots for withholding support for proposed city regulation of emissions from two coal-fired power plants, one of which stands in the ward.<br />&nbsp;<br />One of his challengers was Ambrosio &ldquo;Ambi&rdquo; Medrano Jr., a city Department of Transportation worker and son of the former alderman who went to prison. Medrano had backing from organized labor. The other challenger was construction contractor Cuahutémoc &ldquo;Temoc&rdquo; Morfín, an immigrant rights activist who came within a dozen votes of forcing Solís into a runoff in 2007.</p><p><strong>26th Ward</strong></p><p>The 26th ward has one of the youngest candidates on the ballot. 18-year-old Devon Reid is a studying at Wright College to be a high school history teacher. He says his love of history leads naturally to a love of politics. He's going up against an experienced politician, Roberto Maldonado. Maldonado spent 15 years on the Cook County Board of Commissioners before being appointed 26th ward alderman by Mayor Richard Daley in 2009. This is Maldonado's first election for alderman but he's got $200,000 to spend on the race. Reid has raised about $3,000 in cash and in kind contributions. He says most of that has come from his foster family.<br /> <strong><br />32nd Ward</strong><br /> <br />Scott Waguespack was elected to the city council in 2007 and was considered part of a group of new independents who would question and challenge the policies of Mayor Richard Daley. There weren't that many challenges, but Waguespack is one of the aldermen who voted against the now largely reviled parking meter deal. Waguespack says that deal crystalized for voters all the ways city hall isn't working. He says aldermen have focused solely on their wards to the detriment of the citywide issues.<br /> <br />Waguespack is facing a challenge from David Pavlik who currently works in the governor's office of management and the budget. Pavlik is getting support from 33rd Ward Ald. Dick Mell. That's a little awkward because Mell sits next to Waguespack in the city council. Mell says he likes Waguespack, whom he refers to as a &quot;young man,&quot; but Pavlik's mother used to work for Mell so Mell gave her the okay to siphon off any of his political workers who wanted to help her out. Mell's seat is safe because he has no challenger. Mell says he's also dispatched workers to the 41st and 43rd wards, and he's supporting Rey Colon in the 35th. In addition to Pavlik, Waguespack is also trying to fend off challenges from Brian Gorman and Bryan Lynch.</p><p><em>Chip Mitchell and Robert Wildeboer contributed to this report.</em></p></p> Tue, 22 Feb 2011 23:11:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/12th-ward/west-side-aldermanic-races Something You Should Eat: Liquid custard bao from Triple Crown http://www.wbez.org/blog/steve-dolinsky/something-you-should-eat-liquid-custard-bao-triple-crown <p><p style="text-align: center;"><iframe height="350" frameborder="0" width="500" src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/19289331?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;color=c40215"></iframe></p> <p>With the Year of the Rabbit upon us this Thursday night, I figured many of you will be making the trek down to Chinatown, so here's another dessert option, which absolutely beats the industrially-made fortune cookie. First, let me just say&nbsp;I consider myself a huge fan of any kind of <em>bao</em> or Chinese bun. Initially, the love affair was limited to the ubiquitous red-tinged, steamed BBQ pork buns called <em>char siu bao</em>, but it's moved way beyond that savory snack package. Recently, I had a sweet dessert bun at <a href="http://www.triplecrownchicago.com/">Triple Crown</a> in Chinatown, called<em> lao sa bao</em>, which translates to &quot;flowing sand bun.&quot; &nbsp;There are egg yolks - and plenty of sugar involved - but I love the gritty, sweet lava that oozes from these warm buns, especially after plowing off a few steamer trays full of <em>har gao</em> and <em>chow fun</em>. &nbsp;Incidentally, I had another excellent version of the <em>lao sa bao</em> about a week ago at the new <a href="http://www.minghincuisine.com/">MingHin Cuisine</a> in the Chinatown Square Mall. Totally different exterior (more flaky than squishy) and I think it actually edges out the Triple Crown version. You'll have to decide for yourself. Happy New Year!</p></p> Tue, 01 Feb 2011 12:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blog/steve-dolinsky/something-you-should-eat-liquid-custard-bao-triple-crown