WBEZ | Chinatown http://www.wbez.org/tags/chinatown Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Morning Shift: SNL’s Vanessa Bayer returns to her comedy roots http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-05-29/morning-shift-snl%E2%80%99s-vanessa-bayer-returns-her-comedy-roots-112107 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/VB.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 500px;" title="Photo Courtesy of Twitter" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207849660&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Ex U.S. Speaker Hastert indicted on bank-related charges</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Former longtime U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert is facing Federal prosecution after it was announced Thursday that bank-related charges against are being filed. The former U.S. House Speaker is accused of lying to the FBI and withdrawing $952,000 in cash in a way that evaded the requirement that banks report cash transactions over $10,000. We talk with NPR&#39;s David Schaper joins us with <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/ex-us-speaker-hastert-indicted-bank-related-charges-112105">the latest.</a></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/davidschaperNPR">David Schaper</a> is NPR&#39;s&nbsp;</em><em>National Desk Correspondent in Chicago.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207849658&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Chinatown Plan</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">On Thursday, community leaders in Chinatown greenlighted that community&rsquo;s first-ever comprehensive plan to thrive in the decades to come. The Chinatown Community Vision Plan was two years in the making, and goes well beyond just recommending more bike lanes or better street lighting. It also recommends ways to bring up the education and workforce opportunities for residents in that area. WBEZ North Side reporter Odette Yousef has <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/city-planners-and-neighborhood-residents-map-out-chinatowns-future-112103">details on the plan</a>, and we hear from members of the community about what this might mean.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef">Odette Yousef</a> is WBEZ&#39;s North Side bureau reporter.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207849654&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Celebrating the birthday of science</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">More than two thousand years ago this weekend, the ancient Greek philosopher Thales correctly predicted a solar eclipse not by divination and supernatural means, but by using math, previously-written information, and observation. Thus Thales is dubbed &ldquo;the father of science&rdquo; and that eclipse on May 28, 585 B.C. is called &ldquo;the birthday of science.&rdquo; To commemorate the event the Illinois Science Council is putting on the <a href="http://www.illinoisscience.org/event/chicago-science-festival/">Chicago Science Fest,</a> three days of talks and exhibits that highlight the incredible amount of scientific work that goes on all the time in and around Chicago. ISC founder and leader Monica Meltzer stops by to talk about all the brain-bending events on tap.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/MonicaMetzler">Monica Metzler</a> is the Founder and Executive Director of the <a href="https://twitter.com/IllinoisScience">Illinois Science Council.</a></em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207849649&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">SNL&rsquo;s Vanessa Bayer returns to her comedy roots</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><a href="https://twitter.com/vanessabayer">Vanessa Bayer</a> is living the comedy dream. The Ohio native came to Chicago after college and honed her skills at the Annoyance Theater, iO, and Second City. In 2010, she made the cut and joined Saturday Night Live as a feature player. Two years later, she got bumped up and has been part of the main cast ever since. She&rsquo;s back in town as part of <a href="http://www.26comedy.com/">The Onion&rsquo;s comedy fes</a>t, and joins Morning Shift for some laughs and a trip down memory lane before her show at <a href="https://twitter.com/ThaliaHallChi">Thalia Hall.</a></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/vanessabayer">Vanessa Bayer</a> is a <a href="https://twitter.com/nbcsnl">Saturday Night Live</a> cast member.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207849647&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Todos de Pie</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Chicago jazz drummer Frank Rosaly was born in Arizona to Puerto Rican parents and his latest project Todos de Pie! ( Everybody Stand Up!), has him reaching back to his Latino roots with a modern spin. He&rsquo;s using as his foundation the music of renowned Puerto Rican bandleader Erfrain &ldquo;Mon&rdquo; Rivera and artists that appeared on a compilation of Puerto Rican Bomba and Plena music from the early part of the 20th century. Rosaly plays for us.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em>Todos de Pie is a Chicago-based band formed by <a href="http://www.frankrosaly.com/">Frank Rosaly.</a></em></p></p> Fri, 29 May 2015 07:56:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-05-29/morning-shift-snl%E2%80%99s-vanessa-bayer-returns-her-comedy-roots-112107 City planners and neighborhood residents map out Chinatown's future http://www.wbez.org/news/city-planners-and-neighborhood-residents-map-out-chinatowns-future-112103 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Chinatown-Red-Line-1_130528_LW.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr"><em>Updated 5:47 p.m.</em></p><p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-a7532958-9e1b-61c0-e76b-22587abcccbd">If city planners get their way, Chicago&rsquo;s Chinatown will be safer, cleaner, greener, livelier and more educated in decades to come.</p><p dir="ltr">On Thursday neighborhood stakeholders gave a green-light to the <a href="http://www.cmap.illinois.gov/documents/10180/59632/Chinatown%20Community%20Vision%20Plan%20-%20Low%20Resolution/0fe0fb4c-e422-4183-8f3e-ba2a78abadaa">Chinatown Community Vision Plan</a>, a comprehensive strategy with the input of more than 1,300 residents, workers and business owners, to strengthen the mostly-immigrant enclave.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;We&rsquo;re looking at this plan as a guide for people who have anything to do with the future development of the community,&rdquo; said C.W. Chan, chairperson of the Coalition for a Better Chinese American Community (CBCAC) and co-chair of the planning effort. &ldquo;So it will be used by the government, and it will be used by the private stakeholders.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">The two-year effort has been led by Chan, 25th ward alderman Daniel Solis, and planners with the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP).</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;One thing that was unique about this from the start was that the community came to us and requested it,&rdquo; said Stephen Ostrander, a senior planner with CMAP. &ldquo;It wasn&rsquo;t a project through the City of Chicago.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Unlike Chinatowns in many other cities, Chicago&rsquo;s has been growing &mdash; with population increasing 26 percent between 2000 and 2010 &mdash; thanks in part to the continual arrival of new immigrants from mainland China. Chan said through the plan, Chinatown will not just become a more attractive place for visitors, but a more desirable place for its residents to continue to live.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;When we&rsquo;re talking about economic development for the community, a lot of time we were focusing on tourists &mdash; that Chinatown is really a tourist attraction, we have to do everything possible to attract tourism,&rdquo; said Chan. &ldquo;When we started engaging and talking to people in the community, we realized that this is not just a tourist attraction.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">The community vision plan talks about improving transportation, supporting businesses, and expanding green space. But it also looks at improving education and workforce development in a place where 65 percent of residents are foreign-born, and a majority struggle with English.</p><p dir="ltr">Among the plan&rsquo;s key recommendations:</p><ul dir="ltr"><li>Improve safety: Make public spaces, such as sidewalks, more attractive and lively to deter crime; improve relations between the community and police.</li><li>Transportation and circulation: Increase and beautify transit infrastructure; increase bike lanes and bike racks; assess parking needs; improve pedestrian safety at major intersections; better connect &ldquo;Old Chinatown&rdquo; (south of Cermak on Wentworth) to &ldquo;New Chinatown&rdquo; (north of Archer).</li><li>Residential community: Make Chinatown more &ldquo;age-friendly&rdquo; by enhancing access for people with wheelchairs and strollers; install more public benches; increase the number of assisted-living homes for the elderly.</li><li>Economic development: Build training and networking opportunities for small business owners; partner with city tourism organizations to market Chinatown; increase the diversity of retail.</li><li>Education and workforce: Identify documents and applications that the City should translate into Chinese; support parents in navigating and engaging with the public school system; assess the need for a high school in Chinatown; increase vocational ESL training opportunities.</li><li>Parks and public spaces: Improve park lighting and landscaping to increase safety; encourage proper waste disposal and community street cleanups; increase green spaces and streetscaping.</li><li>Future development: Consider development uses for vacant lots in and adjacent to Chinatown</li><li>Long-term capacity building: Develop a plan to continually solicit participation from Chinatown residents and stakeholders; cultivate the next generation of community leaders.</li></ul><p dir="ltr">Chan said the seed for the comprehensive plan was planted in 2012, when Chinatown celebrated its 100th anniversary. The milestone provided an opportunity not just to reflect on how the community has sustained itself, but also to consider the possibilities moving forward.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;We came to realize that we have to define our rightful place in the city of Chicago, and be part of the planning and part of the development of the City of Chicago so that we can grow together with the City of Chicago and the region,&rdquo; said Chan.</p><p>There is no dollar figure attached to the plan. Community leaders plan to begin implementing it this summer.</p><p><em>Odette Yousef is WBEZ&rsquo;s North Side Bureau reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef">@oyousef</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/wbezoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>.</em></p></p> Thu, 28 May 2015 14:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/city-planners-and-neighborhood-residents-map-out-chinatowns-future-112103 Greek austerity update, 'Only God Forgives' reviewed and a world music festival http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-19/greek-austerity-update-only-god-forgives-reviewed-and-world-music <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP57034231517.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We get an update on Greek austerity measures. Milos Stehlik reviews the French-Danish film &#39;Only God Forgives.&#39; Nari Safavi helps listeners plan a weekend full of international flair.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F101763523&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-only-god-forgives-reviewed-and-internati.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-only-god-forgives-reviewed-and-internati" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Greek austerity update, 'Only God Forgives' reviewed and a world music festival" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Fri, 19 Jul 2013 11:55:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-19/greek-austerity-update-only-god-forgives-reviewed-and-world-music Loss of Red Line service brings changes to Chinatown http://www.wbez.org/news/loss-red-line-service-brings-changes-chinatown-107365 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/chinatown.jpg" title="Near the CTA Red Line stop at Cermak-Chinatown. Workers were out on the tracks Friday getting started on a massive reconstruction project. (WBEZ/Lewis Wallace)" /></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F93713993&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Some business owners are worried about a slow summer near the Cermak-Chinatown Red Line stop, but expanded water taxi service may pick up some of the slack. Nine south side stations are closed until October for reconstruction.</p><p>Just down the street from the Chinatown Red Line, Michelle Zhang was ringing up a steady stream of newspapers and lottery tickets in her gift shop. But she said she&rsquo;s concerned about the Red Line.</p><p>&ldquo;I think it&rsquo;s no good for the business,&rdquo; she said. The street was hopping with locals getting groceries, tea and pastries -- it&rsquo;s tourist shoppers that may be more of a concern. In another gift shop, Yat Wong agrees.</p><p>&ldquo;I think it will affect me a lot since the station is closed for more than 5 months, I guess, but nothing I can do,&rdquo; he said. And he says his daughter&rsquo;s been rerouted to school, as have other kids he knows. &ldquo;Almost affect everyone in Chinatown, I guess. Every family.&rdquo;</p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F94308827"></iframe><p>Starting Tuesday, commuters looking for an alternate to the Red Line have a new way to travel between Chinatown and downtown: a water taxi. The Chinatown taxi has operated on weekends since 2009, and this year they&rsquo;ve added a new black and yellow boat to the fleet that will be used to provide weekday service.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s a great alternative if for no reason other than it&rsquo;s more fun and scenic,&rdquo; said Andrew Sargis, Chief of Operations of the Chicago Water Taxi, which is a private subsidiary of Wendella Sightseeing.</p><p>A boat will depart from Ping Tom Memorial Park every twenty minutes from 10am to 9pm, and tickets are $4 one way. The ride to near Union Station is about 12 to 15 minutes, and a transfer can get you further north or east along the Chicago River.</p><p>But total travel time depends on traffic.</p><p>&ldquo;We can get barge traffic, we can get kayakers, we can get other commercial boat traffic,&rdquo; said Sargis, adding that on the weekends, sailboats can also be trouble.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.15;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;margin-left: -36pt;margin-right: -36pt;"><em><b id="docs-internal-guid-23161088-d872-17fe-5060-74fbae141146" style="font-weight:normal;"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Lew</span></b>is Wallace is a Pritzker Journalism Fellow at WBEZ. Follow him <a href="http://twitter.com/lewispants">@lewispants</a>.</em></p><div>&nbsp;</div><br /></p> Sat, 25 May 2013 06:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/loss-red-line-service-brings-changes-chinatown-107365 Comfort me with minced beef and egg over rice http://www.wbez.org/blogs/louisa-chu/2012-12/comfort-me-minced-beef-and-egg-over-rice-104435 <p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/louisachu/8283017513/"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/mincedbeefgourmet.jpg" style="height: 412px; width: 620px;" title=" Minced beef with egg over rice at May May Gourmet Food Inc. in Chicago's Chinatown (WBEZ/Louisa Chu)" /></a></p><p>Sometimes, all we can do is turn to comfort food &mdash; but what and why?</p><p>According to University of Illinois researcher Brian Wansink, best known as the author of <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0553804340?ie=UTF8&amp;creativeASIN=0553804340&amp;tag=lklchu-20"><em>Mindless Eating</em></a>, our preferences differ across gender and age.&nbsp;&quot;Males preferred warm, hearty, meal-related comfort foods (such as steak, casseroles, and soup), while females instead preferred comfort foods that were more snack related (such as chocolate and ice cream). In addition, younger people preferred more snack-related comfort foods compared to those over 55 years of age,&quot;&nbsp;Wansink and his team wrote in <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031938403002038"><em>Physiology &amp; Behavior</em></a>.&nbsp;</p><p>&quot;Men prefer the more &#39;meal&ndash;type&#39; items because this gave them a feeling of being &#39;spoiled&#39; or &#39;taken care of&#39;, whereas those same foods reminded women of all the work that went into preparing the meal,&quot; according to&nbsp;<a href="http://foodpsychology.cornell.edu/outreach/comfort-food.html">Cornell&#39;s Food and Brand Lab</a>, where Wansink now serves as director.</p><p>Me? I do reach for chocolate first. But then, more often than not, I crave a curiously named dish: minced beef and egg over rice.&nbsp;</p><p>It is, in fact, what we now know as ground beef, but its &quot;minced beef&quot; moniker is an etymological clue to its British colonial history, suggesting its place among a treasure trove of Hong Kong diner-style classics.</p><p>I haven&#39;t been able to trace the full origins of this particular dish yet, but I do remember it first appeared in Chicago in the 1980s&nbsp;at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.maymaygourmet.com/">May May Gourmet Food Inc.</a>&nbsp;in Chinatown, along with the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_American_history#Third_wave_.281980s_to_today.29">third major wave</a> of Chinese-American immigration. The owners and cooks may have changed over the years, but the core menu has stayed the same.</p><p>I&#39;m not sure what the comfort food study says about me, but while minced beef and egg is easy enough to make at home, and there are a lot of good looking recipes online, I do prefer to order it out.&nbsp;My current favorite version &mdash; where the egg is actually optional, fried or raw &mdash; can be found next door to May May at relative newcomer <a href="http://www.go4foodusa.com/G4F-v3.0/G4F/Home.aspx">Go 4 Food</a>. (Please note they&#39;re closed on Tuesdays.) But you can find the dish elsewhere, too, now that you know its secret name.</p><p>And with that, I hope you too find comfort.</p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/agashi/5035348340/"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/mincedbeefgo4food.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="Minced beef with raw nest egg over rice at Go 4 Food in Chicago's Chinatown (flickr/agashi)" /></a></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></p> Tue, 18 Dec 2012 10:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/louisa-chu/2012-12/comfort-me-minced-beef-and-egg-over-rice-104435 Elderly expect brunt of postal closures http://www.wbez.org/story/elderly-expect-brunt-postal-closures-94620 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-December/2011-12-05/photo.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The U.S. Postal Service announced that during the busy holidays it will take a break from a controversial plan to close post offices, but the issue is still stewing in some neighborhoods - especially among elderly residents.</p><p>Eleven post offices in Chicago are on the list of potential closures, nearly all on the city’s South and West Sides. Those are the communities where many say that older residents will bear the brunt of the hardship of having to travel farther to use a full-service postal facility.</p><p>Residents near those locations received letters over the summer notifying them of the proposal to close their local post office, and inviting comments. Dorothy Sumpter, a 73-year-old resident of the North Lawndale neighborhood, said as soon as she received the letter, she put the date of a public town hall meeting on the proposal on her calendar.</p><p>“People like me need the post office,” said Sumpter, “so that’s why I wanted to be in on it. I’m a citizen and I use every right that I possibly can.”</p><p>Sumpter uses the Otis Grant Collins Post Office, where revenue dropped $200,000 between fiscal years 2007 and 2010. Throughout the nation, post offices are seeing a decline in revenues and foot traffic, attributed to the shift to online bill-paying and correspondence. But Sumpter says she and many other elderly people like her aren’t part of the internet-using trend.</p><p>“I don’t feel comfortable using it,” she said. “I’m old-fashioned.”</p><p>Sumpter goes to the post office every week because she has a P.O. Box there, but also to buy stamps and mail her bills. She said she feels comfortable going there because it’s easy to access on foot and by bus, and she knows all the workers by name. If the Otis Grant Collins branch closes, the next closest post office would be in Cicero. “Which I don’t even know where the post office is in Cicero,” Sumpter laughed. “And I don’t really want to have to go over there just to go to a post office, because many times I can walk to the post office in less than 15 minutes.”</p><p>Sumpter said she fears that the elderly will become more isolated if they lose their neighborhood post offices, because many are less mobile to begin with, and sometimes walking to the post office is a crucial part of their social interaction and weekly exercise regime. Karen Schenck, Chicago District Manager/Postmaster, said many share Sumpter’s view.</p><p>“That was the largest concern. If you had to ask me what was the biggest concern of all the town hall meetings,” said Schenck, “was people were concerned about the elderly in their own community.”</p><p>The list of proposed closures came from USPS headquarters in Washington, D.C., said Schenck.</p><p>“Nobody took into consideration any other fact except for how much revenue,” she explained, “and if there was another post office within two miles close to it that could service the community.”</p><p>Schenck says the district office is now looking at population data to see how many elderly live near the post offices that may close. She says that’ll help them make a final decision. Schenck says of the 11 offices on the shortlist, some will be spared.</p><p>But concern for the elderly may be loudest in Chicago’s Chinatown. Of the zip codes where offices may close, Chinatown’s is the one with the greatest portion of residents over age 65, with several senior housing high rises in the immediate vicinity of the post office. Chinatown’s elderly also say they have an unique need - a place where people are bilingual.</p><p>“The employees, they don’t speak Chinese,” said 60-year old Harry Wong.</p><p>Wong is like many elderly Chinese immigrants in Chicago who speak limited English. He uses the Chinatown post office because if there’s a language barrier, he can turn to other customers in the store for help translating. That’s the reason that many elderly Chinese who live in other places will often bypass a closer post office to go to Chinatown’s.</p><p>Chinatown organizers have gathered hundreds of handwritten letters from residents to protest the potential closure of their post office. USPS is still accepting those comments, and says no post offices will close before March.</p></p> Tue, 06 Dec 2011 23:17:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/elderly-expect-brunt-postal-closures-94620 Chicago post offices facing potential closures and service cuts http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-09-21/chicago-post-offices-facing-potential-closures-and-service-cuts-92256 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-September/2011-09-21/Post Office.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The <a href="http://www.usps.com/" target="_blank">U.S. Postal Service</a> clearly faced a severe cash flow problem - what wasn’t so clear was how to solve it. In an effort to reduce costs, more than 3,000 post offices have been considered for closure nationwide, including 14 in and around Chicago. But <em>Eight Forty-Eight</em> wondered how the public felt about the potential plans. To find out, <em>Eight Forty-Eight</em> visited two of the post offices targeted for closure: the <a href="http://usps.whitepages.com/service/post_office/haymarket-postal-store-168-n-clinton-st-chicago-il-1366551" target="_blank">Haymarket </a>station at Clinton and Lake streets and the <a href="http://usps.whitepages.com/service/post_office/chinatown-postal-store-2345-s-wentworth-ave-ste-a-chicago-il-1357957" target="_blank">Chinatown</a> station.</p><p>Then, for more details from within the U.S. Postal Service, host Alison Cuddy was joined by Mark Reynolds, the Chicago District spokesperson for <a href="http://www.usps.com/" target="_blank">USPS</a>, and Mack Julion<strong>, </strong>president of the <a href="http://nalcbr11.org/" target="_blank">National Association of Letter Carriers’ Branch 11</a> in Chicago.</p><p><em>Music Button: Pablo Sanches feat. Colonel Red, "Release da Freak", from the CDX Nickodemus Presents: Turntables on the Hudson Vol. 8, (ESL)</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 21 Sep 2011 13:25:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-09-21/chicago-post-offices-facing-potential-closures-and-service-cuts-92256 Solis hangs on in 25th after power plant flip-flop http://www.wbez.org/story/25th-ward/solis-hangs-25th-after-power-plant-flip-flop-84808 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-April/2011-04-06/1Solis.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago Ald. Danny Solis hung on in his 25th Ward runoff Tuesday. But the defeated candidate says he too has reason to celebrate.<br> <br> Solis did not support a proposal for the city to regulate emissions from coal-fired power plants — he didn't, that is, until he fell short in the election’s first round and landed in the runoff.<br> <br> Solis says he needed to get in tune with constituents upset about the Fisk Generating Station, a coal-fired plant in Pilsen, a largely Mexican neighborhood in the ward. The flip-flop seems to have sealed his reelection.<br> <br> “I am committed to passing the Clean [Power] Ordinance in the city of Chicago,” Solis told his supporters Tuesday night after winning about 54 percent of the runoff vote.<br> <br> The losing candidate, Cuahutémoc Morfin, took credit: “We made him come to the right side of the issue in the environmental issue, which is the coal plant here, which pollutes the air that we breathe.”<br> <br> With Solis behind the power-plant proposal, it has a better chance of passing the City Council.</p></p> Wed, 06 Apr 2011 08:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/25th-ward/solis-hangs-25th-after-power-plant-flip-flop-84808 As Illinois redistricting begins, public gets say http://www.wbez.org/story/chinatown/illinois-redistricting-begins-public-gets-say-84382 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-March/2011-03-28/IMG_0008.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Illinois state senators are hearing from Chicago area residents who want a say in redistricting, the once-a-decade, highly contentious and political process that determines boundaries for legislative districts. It is about power and influence, and on Monday afternoon dozens of people showed up to tell senators how they want the boundaries drawn.<br /> <br /> Kyle Hillman lives in Chicago's Rogers Park neighborhood, and said the community is a poor fit for its current district.<br /> <br /> &quot;There's a high crime rate and it has one of the largest food kitchens in the metro area, and yet it is included in a district that is mostly consisting of lakefront homes in Evanston in New Trier,&quot; Hillman told the Senate Redistricting Committee.<br /> <br /> Others complained their neighborhoods span several districts, watering down the community's influence.<br /> <br /> &quot;The greater Chinatown community area is a vibrant and cohesive community. Its interests are not served by being split into multiple districts, as it is currently,&quot; said Bernie Wong of the Chinese American Service League.</p><p>C. Betty Magness with the group IVI-IPO urged the senators to ignore politicians' addresses when they draft the boundaries.<br /><br />&quot;Districts should not be drawn to favor or discriminate against incumbents, candidates or parties,&quot; Magness said.<br /><br />Another issue that came up Monday has to do with the addresses of prisoners. Right now, they are counted as residents where they are incarcerated, which is most often downstate.<br /><br />&quot;Prisoners should be counted where they originate from, instead of where they're currently housed,&quot; testified Lawrence Hill with the Cook County Bar Association.<br /><br />The Illinois House could actually vote to make that change as early as Tuesday, according to the bill's sponsor, state Rep. LaShawn Ford. But the Chicago Democrat said it would not take effect until the next redistricting - ten years from now.</p><p>Monday's hearing was the first of <a href="http://ilsenateredistricting.com/index.php?option=com_content&amp;view=article&amp;id=78&amp;Itemid=117">at least five public forums</a> for the Senate committee. Lawmakers have until the end of June to approve a new legislative map, or the process will be put in the hands of a <a href="http://www.ilga.gov/commission/lrb/con4.htm">special commission</a>.</p></p> Mon, 28 Mar 2011 21:04:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/chinatown/illinois-redistricting-begins-public-gets-say-84382 Illinois law aims to protect minority voter rights http://www.wbez.org/story/cw-chan/illinois-law-aims-protect-minority-voter-rights <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/quinn 001.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Minority group advocates say Illinois took a big step Monday toward protecting their political voices with the signing of the Illinois Voting Rights Act of 2011.</p><p>&ldquo;The rules in the districts are gerrymandered so they are rigged against anyone who may have a group in a particular area,&rdquo; said Governor Pat Quinn at the bill signing in Chicago&rsquo;s Chinatown. &ldquo;One of the purposes of the law is to make sure our racial minorities, our language minorities, our citizens who live in a particular area, get a fair chance to elect the person of their choice.&rdquo;</p><p>The law was introduced by State Sen. Kwame Raoul, D-Chicago, after both Republicans and Democrats failed to rewrite the laws that govern legislative redistricting. Both parties proposed competing amendments to the state constitution to avoid what happened the last three times the lines were drawn: partisan deadlocks forced legislators to choose either a Democrat or a Republican from a hat, literally, and the winner drew the map.</p><p>Chinatown community leaders praised the new law, which they had lobbied for in Springfield. C.W. Chan of the Coalition for a Better Chinese American Community, said when Illinois redistricted in the past, Chinatown became a textbook case of how concentrated minority populations could be marginalized.</p><p>&ldquo;Despite meeting all criteria for inclusion in a single district, like compactness, contiguity, and being a community of interest,&rdquo; said Chan, &ldquo;we are nevertheless not protected by any law as we do not have the magic number of the voting age majority.&rdquo;</p><p>Chan hopes the new law will help Chinese-Americans on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side fall into fewer legislative and representative districts. Currently, they are divided between four wards, four state representative districts, three state senate districts, and three Congressional districts. Community leaders say that has made it difficult to lobby for the government services and resources that their immigrant community needs.</p><div style="background-color: transparent; ">&nbsp;</div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 07 Mar 2011 23:55:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/cw-chan/illinois-law-aims-protect-minority-voter-rights