WBEZ | love http://www.wbez.org/tags/love Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en StoryCorps Chicago: Changed by Friendship http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/storycorps-chicago-changed-friendship-113879 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Sarah Michaelson and Michael Herzovi.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>A few years ago, Sarah Michaelson went to see a friend perform in an old-fashioned radio show in front of a live audience. During the show, a man in a wheelchair told a story about how he had never had a girlfriend. Sarah was impressed by his performance and approached him after the show.</p><p>Michael Herzovi and Sarah eventually became Facebook friends. The two recently stopped by the StoryCorps booth to talk about the time she asked him out on their first date.</p><p dir="ltr"><em><a href="http://www.storycorps.org">StoryCorps&rsquo; </a>mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. These excerpts, edited by WBEZ, present some of our favorites from the current visit, as well as from previous trips.</em></p><p dir="ltr"><em>This story was recorded in partnership with the&nbsp;<a href="http://reelabilitieschicago.org/" target="_blank">Reel Abilities Film Festival</a>.</em></p><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Fri, 20 Nov 2015 15:01:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/storycorps-chicago-changed-friendship-113879 Dating app helps Muslim millennials find love, parents not included http://www.wbez.org/news/dating-app-helps-muslim-millennials-find-love-parents-not-included-113781 <p><div id="res454005967" previewtitle="Tariq and Ummehaany Azam dance to &quot;Fly Me to the Moon&quot; at their wedding reception."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Tariq and Ummehaany Azam dance to &quot;Fly Me to the Moon&quot; at their wedding reception." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/02/beautiful-dancers-15b631dbcb4c1443ff45387a00f62128ecad73d1-s700-c85.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="Tariq and Ummehaany Azam dance to &quot;Fly Me to the Moon&quot; at their wedding reception. (Courtesy of Tariq Azam)" /></div><div><div><p>Finding someone to spend your life with can be hard under any circumstances, but young observant Muslims will tell you that here in the U.S., it&#39;s doubly so. They have to navigate strict Islamic dating rules while interacting with the opposite gender in a Westernized world.</p><p>Now, a handful of young Muslims think that a new app called Ishqr provides a partial solution.</p></div></div></div><p>Humaira Mubeen is one of the many Muslim millennials who self-identifies as a &quot;Mipster,&quot; or Muslim hipster. &quot;I became part of this community called Mipsters. It was a bunch of proud Muslim Americans coming together talking about a lot of issues,&quot; says Mubeen. &quot;One of the topics of discussion was always trying to get married.&quot;</p><p>Apparently, it&#39;s hard to find someone who is not only compatible, but also shares a mix of Muslim and American values. Mubeen says, &quot;A year into being part of [the Mipster] community, I jokingly said, &#39;Why don&#39;t I make a website to connect all of you, because you all seem really cool?&#39; &quot;</p><p>Then the emails started pouring in with people asking where to sign up. Mubeen tried to explain that she had been joking, but eventually she felt compelled to build Ishqr, a website to help Muslims find each other. &quot;If Instagram and dating apps had a baby, it would be Ishqr,&quot; says Mubeen.</p><div id="res454245229"><aside aria-label="pullquote" role="complementary"><div><p>Finding someone to spend your life with can be hard under any circumstances, but young observant Muslims will tell you that here in the U.S., it&#39;s doubly so.</p></div></aside></div><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Capture_5.JPG" style="height: 258px; width: 310px; float: right; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" title="" /><em>Ishq&nbsp;</em>is an Arabic word for love, and the &quot;r&quot; was added at the end, Mubeen says, to make it sound more hip. More than 6,000 people have signed up on the Ishqr website since it went up just over a year ago. The app went live on iTunes in October.</p><p>Mubeen explains that when you sign up, Ishqr asks you for some basic information: a username, your religious preference (Shia, Sunni and &quot;Just Muslim, yo&quot; are all options) and why you&#39;ve decided to join. She says people sign up to make friends, test the waters and sometimes to get married.</p><p>Some users come in with the mentality that, &quot;If you don&#39;t want to get married in the next five months, let&#39;s not talk.&quot; Talking about marriage right up front might sound a little pushy, but it can work.</p><p>Tariq and Ummehaany Azam met on Ishqr. He&#39;s a medical resident, and she&#39;s a test development professional. Ummehaany described what led her to Ishqr: &quot;This is the first website for the Muslim community in which the person looking to meet someone is creating their own profile, and they are more involved in what goes into the profile and in talking about what they are looking for.&quot;</p><p>That&#39;s important, because on many Muslim online matchmaking sites, parents play matchmaker, and young people don&#39;t have much of a say. Tariq was on one of those more traditional sites for a couple of weeks. &quot;I actually received a phone call from some girl&#39;s mother,&quot; he says, &quot;being like, &#39;We saw your profile, we really like you.&#39; And I was completely shocked. ... That was way too much.&quot; He deleted his profile the next day.</p><p>Besides keeping parents out of the picture, Ishqr is different from other dating sites in another way: Photos aren&#39;t posted. As cliche as it sounds, it really is about discovering someone&#39;s personality. When he joined Ishqr, Tariq found Ummehaany&#39;s profile and asked her to read his. Evidently she liked what she saw: The two married this past May.</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2015/11/13/453988763/ishqr-helps-muslim-millenials-find-love-parents-not-included?ft=nprml&amp;f=453988763" target="_blank"><em> via NPR&#39;s Code Switch</em></a></p></p> Fri, 13 Nov 2015 13:03:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/dating-app-helps-muslim-millennials-find-love-parents-not-included-113781 'We're engaged!' http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/were-engaged-112636 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps 150807 Ashley Gordon Beth Howard bh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Ashley Gordon and Elizabeth Howard met last year on the dating app Tinder. A few days after they started chatting, they met in person for the first time. It was a Thursday evening and they went to Buena Bar, a restaurant halfway between their two homes.</p><p><em>StoryCorps&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. These excerpts, edited by WBEZ, present some of our favorites from the current visit, as well as from previous trips.</em></p></p> Wed, 12 Aug 2015 14:16:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/were-engaged-112636 Once a Catholic priest, now a father of two http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/once-catholic-priest-now-father-two-112313 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps Francis Alicia Riley bh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Francis Riley was a Catholic priest during the late 1960s. Riley later left the priesthood and became a husband and father. He came to the Chicago StoryCorps booth in May with his wife Margaret and their daughter Alicia. Alicia asked her dad about the ways his time in the priesthood changed him.</p><p><em>StoryCorps&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. These excerpts, edited by WBEZ, present some of our favorites from the current visit, as well as from previous trips.</em></p></p> Fri, 03 Jul 2015 15:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/once-catholic-priest-now-father-two-112313 Irish immigrant ponders losses and gifts from life in U.S. http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/irish-immigrant-ponders-losses-and-gifts-life-us-112148 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps 150605 Peter Magdalen Barry MacEntee bh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Mags MacEntee grew up in rural Ireland. At age 19, she met an Irish medical student named Peter. Six years later, they were married. The Monday after their wedding, MacEntee and her new husband flew to the United States so he could finish his medical residency. Over time, what was supposed to be a temporary move became permanent--with all the gains and losses that came with it. MacEntee came to the StoryCorps booth with her sons Peter and Barry.</p><p><em>StoryCorps&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. These excerpts, edited by WBEZ, present some of our favorites from the current visit, as well as from previous trips.</em></p></p> Fri, 05 Jun 2015 12:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/irish-immigrant-ponders-losses-and-gifts-life-us-112148 Friends brought together by chance discuss life's ups and downs http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/friends-brought-together-chance-discuss-lifes-ups-and-downs-112131 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps 150529 Laura Gabrielle bh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Laura Harris and Gabrielle Shubart are strong friends. Schubart, who volunteers with hospice counseling, is in her fifties. Harris is a retired nurse in her seventies. The two struck up a friendship by chance in 2001 and have remained close ever since.</p><p><em>StoryCorps&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. These excerpts, edited by WBEZ, present some of our favorites from the current visit, as well as from previous trips.</em></p></p> Tue, 02 Jun 2015 13:22:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/friends-brought-together-chance-discuss-lifes-ups-and-downs-112131 StoryCorps Chicago: Will you marry me? http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/storycorps-chicago-will-you-marry-me-111696 <p><p>Jake Keyel and Zibby Greenebaum have been dating on and off since middle school. This past Valentine&rsquo;s Day, they came to the Chicago StoryCorps booth and Keyel surprised Greenebaum by asking her to marry him. It&rsquo;s the first wedding proposal to take place in the Chicago StoryCorps booth in the Cultural Center.</p><p>Greenebaum and Keyel are both quiet people. They first encountered each other online and there was a long period when they would write to each other on the Internet, meet in person, say almost nothing and then go home and talk more on the Internet. &ldquo;I think I was just excited that there was a girl who I was talking to,&rdquo; Keyel says.</p><p>In the StoryCorps booth, they talked about their first date (his mom drove them to see &ldquo;Meet the Parents&rdquo;) and the first song they slow-danced to in high school (&ldquo;I Don&rsquo;t Want to Miss a Thing&rdquo; by Aerosmith). They reminisce about going to Michigan with her family for the first time, staying up late and swimming. It was after that trip that he realized that he loved her.</p><p>Greenebaum says she was &quot;stunned&quot; by the proposal. &quot;You&#39;re going to be really disappointed by what I got you for Valentine&#39;s Day,&quot; Greenebaum says. &quot;Was this under our $5 limit?&quot;</p><hr /><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/RS7285_StoryCorps%20booth%20%282%29-scr_13.JPG" style="height: 120px; width: 180px; float: left; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" title="" /><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;"><a href="http://storycorps.org/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">StoryCorps</a>&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. This excerpt was edited by WBEZ.</em></p></p> Fri, 13 Mar 2015 09:28:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/storycorps-chicago-will-you-marry-me-111696 StoryCorps: Adoptive mom encourages teenage boy http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/storycorps-adoptive-mom-encourages-teenage-boy-111112 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/scorpsadopt.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>&ldquo;My mom was the only one there, but she was a good mom,&rdquo; Matt Fitzsimmons says in this week&rsquo;s StoryCorps. &ldquo;She loved us very much. But she didn&rsquo;t have much to work with, because she was a single mom. And she passed on from cancer when I was 14. My dad came back like two months before my mom passed, and he was going to take care of us. But my dad had enough troubles of his own, with alcohol. So my sister and I had to deal with a single alcoholic parent in the house and basically he was perpetually mad at us for no good reason.&rdquo;</p><p>Fitzsimmons came to StoryCorps with Shirley Paulson, a woman who&rsquo;d known him since before he was born. She had just moved back to Chicago around the time of Fitzsimmons&rsquo; mother&rsquo;s funeral.</p><p>&ldquo;I found you then after your younger sister had gone off to school and you were living alone then with your dad&hellip;That was bad. If I remember correctly you were living with your dad in the house with a dog and a couple cats and it seemed like they had more care than you did.&rdquo;</p><p>Paulson explains how Fitzsimmons worked one summer at a camp alongside their son, Tim.</p><p>&ldquo;When we went to the airport to pick up Tim from camp, Tim said, &lsquo;Matt needs a ride home. Can we bring him home?&rsquo; Sure. So we just jumped you in the car and when we dropped you off at your house, I was stunned to realize that here you&rsquo;d been away all summer, you got your luggage out of the car, went up to the house, and there was nobody there to even say hello.&quot;</p><p>&ldquo;Oh he was there,&rdquo; Fitzsimmons says. &ldquo;He was just asleep on the couch, with the five cars in the driveway and the lawn really long.&quot;</p><p>&ldquo;Exactly,&rdquo; Paulson says. &ldquo;Well, the next day was Labor Day and I thought: Why don&rsquo;t we invite Matt over? We thought maybe you&rsquo;d like to come and join us. So I was a little bit nervous calling you &lsquo;cause I didn&rsquo;t know you that well. So we invited you and you said so quickly: &lsquo;Yes! Sure!&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;And I noticed that you ate and ate and ate and ate. You were hungry. And so I said to my husband afterwards: &lsquo;Do you think Matt would like to come over for some more food tomorrow?&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;Then it became obvious that you were joining us more than the typical teenager coming over to have food with a family.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;I think I talked your head off,&rdquo; Fitzsimmons says. &ldquo;We talked a lot.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;Yeah, we did talk a lot,&rdquo; Paulson says, &ldquo;and I loved that. I felt honored that you would &ndash; as a teenager - take the time to talk to me. And share your life, and it meant so much to me. It really did. But I don&rsquo;t think you realized for a while what it meant to be in the family. It took you a while to register. And it was hard to do because you had to deal with the fact that you had a family. And yet you also were being part of us. And you had loyalty to your family, which was right to do.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;It was frustrating to me to have to drive you home every day across Glenview and drop you off into that nothing of a house. And then come back and pick you up the next day and bring you home and have some nice time with you and drive you back home again. And I thought: &lsquo;Why won&rsquo;t he just move in?&rsquo; But there was some stuff you had to deal with.&rdquo;</p><p>Fitzsimmons says, &ldquo;So, you were the nice person helping me. Then you converted into parental person, which is a huge shift, because you went from nice to &lsquo;You have to do this to get to the next stage of your life.&rsquo;&hellip;When I think about all those twists and turns throughout life. And if I didn&rsquo;t do this turn or that turn where would I be&hellip;That was probably the biggest turn for you to say, &lsquo;We&rsquo;re going to save him from devastation.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;Of course we didn&rsquo;t think of saving you. We thought of we needed you. You&rsquo;ll get that through your head one of these days.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;ll say it officially: I love you.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;Oh, Matt! Can I say &lsquo;I love you&rsquo; too?&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;You do all the time!&rdquo;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/6250422&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="888px"></iframe></p></p> Mon, 17 Nov 2014 17:42:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/storycorps-adoptive-mom-encourages-teenage-boy-111112 Husband and wife battle Alzheimer's together http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/husband-and-wife-battle-alzheimers-together-110260 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Capture_10.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>Ben Ferguson, 66, and his wife of more than four decades, Robyn, 64, grew up in Texas. It&rsquo;s where they met and fell in love. About a year ago, Ben was diagnosed with early stage Alzheimer&rsquo;s disease. And so the couple moved to Chicago to be closer to their daughter and grandchildren. They recently came to the StoryCorps booth in the Chicago Cultural Center to relive Ben&rsquo;s earliest memories, and to describe what the disease has meant for their family.</p><p>Alzheimer&rsquo;s disease, which negatively impacts the brain&rsquo;s ability to remember things, may affect more than five million Americans, according to the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/alzheimers-disease-fact-sheet" target="_blank">National Institute on Aging.</a> That number is growing, however, and could reach as many as 16 million by the year 2050, according to the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.alz.org/documents/greaterillinois/statesheet_illinois(1).pdf" target="_blank">Alzheimer&rsquo;s Association of Greater Illinois.</a></p><p>&ldquo;These memories are going to fade,&rdquo; Robyn said. &ldquo;They&rsquo;ve already begun to,&rdquo; Ben said.</p><p>In the booth, the couple talked about how Ben got into all kinds of trouble in elementary and high school. He once wrecked two of the family cars in one day. He was kicked out of several universities, before finding his footing and eventually earning a PhD in Psychology.</p><p>&ldquo;There have always been two sides to you,&rdquo; Robyn said. &ldquo;You&rsquo;re a bad boy. But you&rsquo;re a good boy too. I liked the bad boy first and now I like the good boy better.&rdquo; &ldquo;Yeah, but the bad boy got you,&rdquo; Ben said, laughing.</p><p>When Ben met Robyn, he said it was love at first sight. She thinks the attraction might have been more physical at first. &ldquo;I was pretty sure I wasn&rsquo;t gonna be able to run over you,&rdquo; Ben said. &ldquo;I was definitely sure that you were one of the prettiest women I have ever seen and I had tender feelings toward you.&rdquo; They married two months after meeting. They had two kids, one of whom moved to Chicago.</p><p>Then about a year ago, Ben started showing signs of Alzheimer&rsquo;s. &ldquo;It was the worst thing that&rsquo;s ever happened to me,&rdquo; Ben said. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m still trying to figure out how to deal with it.&rdquo;</p><p>Now, Ben and Robyn live in Chicago and enjoy spending time with their grandkids. Ben participates in some long-term research programs at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.brain.northwestern.edu/" target="_blank">Northwestern University&rsquo;s Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer&rsquo;s Disease Center (CNADC)</a>. He also takes classes there to help build memory through improvisation and takes part in a buddy program.&nbsp;<a href="https://soundcloud.com/morningshiftwbez/workshop-offers-new-form-of" target="_blank">He and Robyn are part of a storytelling group for Alzheimer&rsquo;s patients and their families.</a></p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;ll just keep working on things,&rdquo; Robyn said. &ldquo;I think we&rsquo;re doing really good,&rdquo; he added.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F6250422" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Fri, 30 May 2014 15:26:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/husband-and-wife-battle-alzheimers-together-110260 Near tragedy tests young love http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/near-tragedy-tests-young-love-109793 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/storycorps molly drew_140228_lk.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>This week, our StoryCorps segment brings a special update.</p><p>The first time they came to the Chicago StoryCorps booth, Molly Timm and Drew Burke were in a long-distance relationship.</p><p>They&rsquo;d never lived in the same city. They were full of joy and hope for their first summer together in Chicago.</p><p>Drew and Molly returned to StoryCorps to fill us in on what happened next, because it wasn&rsquo;t part of their plan.</p><p><strong>MOLLY: </strong>We planned July to be an adventure.</p><p><strong>DREW: </strong>An experience</p><p><strong>MOLLY: </strong>An experience to see how well we could handle being in the same place at the same time for more than a weekend.</p><p><strong>DREW:</strong> I was grocery shopping &hellip; and I got outside and I got a phone call from you. Your parents were in a bad motorcycle accident that day.</p><p>To hear about how the couple handled this tough time (and how Molly&rsquo;s Dad tried to talk Drew into busting him out of rehab after the accident), listen to the audio above.</p><p><em>Lynette Kalsnes is a reporter/producer covering religion, culture and science at WBEZ. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/LynetteKalsnes" target="_blank">@LynetteKalsnes</a>.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F6250422" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 28 Feb 2014 14:28:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/near-tragedy-tests-young-love-109793