WBEZ | U.S. Department of Transportation http://www.wbez.org/tags/us-department-transportation Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en BRT designs for Western, Ashland avenues start to take shape http://www.wbez.org/news/brt-designs-western-ashland-avenues-start-take-shape-103186 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/BRT_option_Western_Ashland.jpg" style="margin: 4px 0px 0px; float: left; height: 357px; width: 320px; " title="Chicago officials say they are considering this design, among others, for bus-rapid-transit routes between Howard and 95th streets. (Courtesy of Chicago Transit Authority)" />Chicago officials say they have decided to leave at least one parking lane on both possible routes of the city&rsquo;s most ambitious bus project. The officials say they have also ruled out narrowing sidewalks along those routes.</p><p>The details emerged Tuesday night at the first of three public meetings the Chicago Transit Authority is holding this week to unveil design alternatives for &ldquo;bus rapid transit&rdquo; along 21 miles of both Ashland and Western avenues.</p><p>All designs the city says it&rsquo;s considering for the corridor include around-the-clock dedicated lanes for the buses and pre-boarding fare collection. Those features would distinguish the project from an express line the city started building along the South Side&rsquo;s Jeffery Boulevard in August. That service, called &ldquo;The Jeffrey Jump,&rdquo; is set to start early next month.</p><p>The Ashland and Western routes would also include traffic lights rigged to favor the buses and station enhancements such as bike racks and electronic bus-tracking signs.</p><p>But CTA and Chicago Department of Transportation officials say they have yet to decide on a range of features that would shave travel times for riders. Those include station platforms and buses equipped with extra-wide doors for quick boarding.</p><p>Other big questions concern whether to put the bus lanes down the middle of the avenues or along the sides, whether each side would have one non-bus travel lane or two, whether to keep parking on both sides, whether to reserve space for a landscaped median, and whether to limit left turns.</p><p>About three-dozen Chicago residents attended Tuesday&rsquo;s session, held in a Humboldt Park church. The meeting included a brief slide show by Scott Kubly, a top CDOT official. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re looking at what happens if we remove a travel lane and we want to hear back from you all [about] how you perceive those impacts,&rdquo; Kubly told them.</p><p>Fernando Benavides, a resident of the nearby Belmont Cragin neighborhood, said the plan to preserve at least one parking lane on each avenue was not enough. &ldquo;Elimination of lanes&nbsp;for cars and parking, my God, that&rsquo;s just going to create a lot of traffic,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Other residents voiced support for any steps to speed up transit service. New city estimates show the Ashland and Western buses averaging as fast as 16-18 miles per hour, almost rivaling CTA Red Line trains, which would average 21 miles per hour if slow zones were repaired. The BRT lines would run between Howard Street on the north and 95th Street on the south.</p><p>The other two meetings are set for Wednesday at Lindblom Math and Science Academy, 6130 S. Wolcott Ave., and Thursday at Lane Tech College Prep High School, 2501 W. Addison St. Both will take place at 5:30 p.m.</p><p>Officials say they will present final decisions on the design alternatives this winter. The city is studying the alternatives using a $1.6 million grant from the Federal Transit Administration, part of the U.S. Department of Transportation. Construction would depend on further federal funding.</p></p> Wed, 17 Oct 2012 01:28:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/brt-designs-western-ashland-avenues-start-take-shape-103186 Rahm vows bus rapid transit, but can he deliver? http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-23/rahm-promises-brt-can-he-deliver-90926 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-August/2011-08-23/Transmilenio.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>All this week, WBEZ is looking at <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/first-100-rahm-emanuels-first-100-days-chicago-mayor" target="_blank">Rahm Emanuel’s first 100 days as Chicago mayor</a>.</p><p>One of Emanuel’s pledges is to push for the creation of the city’s first bus-rapid-transit line. The idea behind BRT is to deliver the benefits of rail at a fraction of the cost. BRT shortens travel times through dedicated bus lanes, pre-paid boarding that’s level with station platforms, and traffic signals that favor the buses.</p><p>WBEZ’s West Side bureau reporter <a href="http://www.wbez.org/staff/chip-mitchell" target="_blank">Chip Mitchell</a> gives us a progress report on Emanuel’s ambitious plan.<br> &nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 23 Aug 2011 16:49:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-23/rahm-promises-brt-can-he-deliver-90926 New fuel standards for trucks make waves at Illinois-based Navistar http://www.wbez.org/story/new-fuel-standards-trucks-make-waves-illinois-based-navistar-90326 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-August/2011-08-09/navistar_ap_namyhuh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The White House has announced <a href="http://www.nhtsa.gov/fuel-economy">new fuel standards</a> for trucks and buses.&nbsp;They'll require trucks built between 2014 and 2018 to drastically reduce fuel consumption.</p><p>The&nbsp;new standards mean big changes for companies like Illinois-based truck manufacturer Navistar International Corporation, said&nbsp;Basili Alukos, an equity analyst with Morningstar.</p><p>According to Alukos, trucks have mostly removed their dangerous emissions.&nbsp;Now, 18-wheelers at Navistar will get their turn at better gas mileage.</p><p>"They typically do about a 150,000 miles a year and they get roughly six miles a gallon," said Alukos. "So I mean, it's ridiculous. If your car got that it'd basically make you broke."</p><p>Certain big-rigs will be required to cut fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 20 percent by 2018. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Transporation, this would save four gallons of fuel for every 100 miles traveled.</p><p>Navistar has <a href="http://www.navistar.com/Navistar/News/Newsroom">not yet announced</a> what changes they'll be making to their new trucks.&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 09 Aug 2011 19:28:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/new-fuel-standards-trucks-make-waves-illinois-based-navistar-90326