WBEZ | expensive http://www.wbez.org/tags/expensive Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en A Mere $392,800 Gets You A Degree!? http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2013-02/mere-392800-gets-you-degree-105687 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/college tuition.jpg" style="float: right; height: 263px; width: 300px;" title="(tax credits/flickr)" />Are you shocked by the cost of a university education today? I am, and I work at a university.</div><p>Frankly, I don&rsquo;t understand how parents and students today are able to pay the present room, board, and tuition costs of an education at either a public college ($25,000) or a private college ($55,000). The cost of higher education has increased at a faster rate than inflation for at least the last ten years.</p><p>And, according to college financial aid consultant Kalman Chany, there is no end in sight. Chany predicts that when today&rsquo;s children to go college, the estimated cost of a state school will be $37,000 a year, and at a private school, the cost will be $98,200.</p><p>When you multiply these numbers by a factor of four, you wind up with public tuition topping out at $150,800, and private tuition at $392,800. (And, by the way, these figures do not include books, spending money, and transportation) Now, don&rsquo;t get me wrong, I&rsquo;m still convinced of the importance of a college education, both in regard to developing competence and a career, as well as addressing the related questions of &ldquo;personal identity and character.&rdquo;</p><p>However, I am also convinced that universities need to redefine their financial models and ways of doing business. The golden ages of the &ldquo;baby boomers&rdquo; charging off to college in unprecedented numbers is over. Birth rates have been down for over 15 years, and so has the pool of normal college age students.</p><p>Moreover, the demands and specific needs of the market place have changed. Nowadays, just getting a degree is no longer a guarantee of getting a job.</p><p>&ldquo;Boomer&rdquo; parents were once able to help, if not, completely pay college bills while simultaneously maintaining a middle class existence and planning for retirement. But, today&rsquo;s parents can&rsquo;t do it all anymore. And, clearly, most students cannot pay for their own tuition.</p><p>Those students who do pay their own bills, often do so by taking on loans that often require 10 to 15 years to pay off. Given today&rsquo;s and tomorrow&rsquo;s projected costs, I simply don&rsquo;t think universities can maintain their present pedagogical model and method of doing education.</p><p>I&rsquo;m convinced that within 15 years, the average university undergraduate curriculum will be a two to a three year experience. Yes, there will be &ldquo;some&rdquo; liberal art; but the focus will be on career preparation and technical competencies. This possible near-future scenario deeply troubles me greatly.</p><p>But, after four-decades in the classroom, I, sadly, just can&rsquo;t imagine any other workable alternative.</p></p> Thu, 28 Feb 2013 05:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2013-02/mere-392800-gets-you-degree-105687 Chicago sports fans look for winning returns on big-money players http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-22/chicago-sports-fans-look-winning-returns-big-money-players-90870 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-August/2011-08-22/cubs its never gonna happen.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Jim Hendry was fired from his post as <a href="http://chicago.cubs.mlb.com/index.jsp?c_id=chc" target="_blank">Chicago Cubs</a> general manager on Friday. His long tenure with the franchise was marked by some rather long-term contracts--some stand to affect the club for years to come. Of course the Cubs don’t have a lock on bad contracts. <em>Eight Forty-Eight </em>decided to look at some of the more notorious contract deals in Chicago sports--and examined whether an athlete’s performance was influenced by the prospect of dangling dollar signs. <em>Eight Forty-Eight</em>'s regular sports gal <a href="http://home.comcast.net/%7Eatthegame/cbio.htm" target="_blank">Cheryl Raye Stout</a> joined blogger and author<a href="http://daynperry.com/" target="_blank"> Dayn Perry </a>to talk with host Alison Cuddy about how big bucks affect big stars.</p></p> Mon, 22 Aug 2011 14:31:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-22/chicago-sports-fans-look-winning-returns-big-money-players-90870