WBEZ | marijuana http://www.wbez.org/tags/marijuana Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Why is it So Hard to Make a Solid Test for Driving While Stoned? http://www.wbez.org/news/why-it-so-hard-make-solid-test-driving-while-stoned-114775 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/marijuana-bud.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Law enforcement officials would love to have a clear way to tell when a driver is too drugged to drive. But the decades of experience the country has in setting limits for alcohol have turned out to be rather useless so far because the mind-altering compound in cannabis, THC, dissolves in fat, whereas alcohol dissolves in water.</p><p>And that changes everything. &quot;It&#39;s really difficult to document drugged driving in a relevant way,&quot; says&nbsp;<a href="http://profiles.columbiapsychiatry.org/profile/mhaney">Margaret Haney</a>, a neurobiologist at Columbia University, &quot;[because of] the simple fact that THC is fat soluble. That makes it absorbed in a very different way and much more difficult to relate behavior to, say, [blood] levels of THC or develop a breathalyzer.&quot;</p><p>When you drink, alcohol spreads through your saliva and breath. It evenly saturates your lungs and blood. Measuring the volume of alcohol in one part of your body can predictably tell you how much is in any other part of your body &mdash; like how much is affecting your brain at any given time.</p><p>That made it possible to do the science on alcohol and crash risk back in the mid-20th century. Eventually, decades of study helped formulate the 0.08 blood alcohol limit as too drunk to drive safely. &quot;The 0.08 standard in alcohol is from decades of careful epidemiological research,&quot; says&nbsp;<a href="https://www.law.berkeley.edu/php-programs/faculty/facultyProfile.php?facID=15052">Andrea Roth</a>, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley.</p><p>But marijuana isn&#39;t like that. The height of your intoxication isn&#39;t at the moment when blood THC levels peak, and the high doesn&#39;t rise and fall uniformly based on how much THC leaves and enters your bodily fluids, says&nbsp;<a href="http://irp.drugabuse.gov/Huestis.php">Marilyn Huestis</a>, who&nbsp;<a href="https://www.drugabuse.gov/news-events/news-releases/2016/02/dr-marilyn-huestis-retires">headed</a>&nbsp;the chemistry and drug metabolism section at the National Institute on Drug Abuse.</p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="435" scrolling="no" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/r8pEKwVl9tA" width="620"></iframe></p><p>Because THC is fat soluble, it moves readily from water environments, like blood, to fatty environments. Fatty tissues act like sponges for the THC, Huestis says. &quot;And the brain is a very fatty tissue. It&#39;s been proven you can still measure THC in the brain even if it&#39;s no longer measurable in the blood.&quot;</p><p>From her research, Huestis found that THC rapidly clears out of the blood in occasional users within a couple of hours. While they&#39;re still high, a trickle of THC leaches out of their brains and other fatty tissues back into the blood until it&#39;s all gone.</p><p>That means a lab test would only find a trace amount of THC in the blood of occasional smokers after a few hours. &quot;You could have smoked a good amount, just waited two hours, still be pretty intoxicated and yet pass the drug test [for driving],&quot; says Haney.</p><p>And if you eat the weed instead of smoking it, Haney says, your blood never carries that much THC. &quot;With oral THC, it takes several hours for [blood THC] to peak, but it remains very low compared to the smoked route, even though they&#39;re very high. It&#39;s a hundredfold difference,&quot; she says.</p><p>But daily users are different. Huestis says that heavy smokers build up so much THC in their body fat that it could continue leaching out for weeks after they last smoked. These chronic, frequent users will also experience a rapid loss of THC from their blood after smoking, but they will also have a constant, moderate level of blood THC even when they&#39;re not high, Huestis says.</p><p>It gets trickier when you try to factor in the chronic effect of smoking weed, Huestis says. &quot;We found [chronic, frequent smokers&#39;] brains had changed and reduced the density of cannabinoid receptors,&quot; she says. They were cognitively impaired for up to 28 days after their last use, and their driving might also still be impaired for that long. &quot;It&#39;s pretty scary,&quot; she says.</p><p>The attitude difference between stoned drivers and alcohol drivers seems clear, Huestis says. Pot smokers, she says, &quot;tend to be more aware they&#39;re impaired than alcohol users.&quot; Drunk drivers are more aggressive, and high drivers are slower. But in her studies, she found that being blazed enough, as when a smoker&#39;s blood THC level peaks at 13 nanograms per milliliter, could be just as a dangerous as driving drunk. The marijuana advocacy group NORML emphasizes that driving high can be dangerous, and advises people to drive sober.</p><p>This all translates into a colossal headache for researchers and lawmakers alike. While scientists continue to bang their heads over how to draw up a biological measurement for marijuana intoxication, legislators want a way to quickly identify and penalize people who are too high to drive.</p><p>The instinct, Huestis says, is to come up with a law that parallels the 0.08 BAC standard for alcohol. &quot;Everyone is looking for one number,&quot; she says. &quot;And it&#39;s almost impossible to come up with one number. Occasional users can be very impaired at one microgram per liter, and chronic, frequent smokers will be over one microgram per liter maybe for weeks.&quot;</p><p>The shaky science around relating blood THC to driving impairment is unfair for people living in marijuana-legal states that have absolute blood THC limits for driving, says Andrea Roth, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley.</p><p>In states like Washington, if a driver is found to have over 5 nanograms of THC per milliliter in their blood, they automatically get a DUI-cannabis. &quot;If we are going to criminalize DUI marijuana, we need to take information from scientific studies and use it to decide if that risk is sufficiently high to be so morally blameworthy that we call it a crime. But we don&#39;t, so picking 5 nanograms per milliliter is arbitrary,&quot; Roth says.</p><p>The complicated biology of THC makes current DUI cases very tricky.</p><p>&quot;Blood isn&#39;t taken in the U.S. until 1.5 to four hours after the [traffic] incident,&quot; Huestis says. By then, THC levels would have fallen significantly, and these people might have been impaired but passed the test. At the same time, a heavy user living in a state like Washington would get a DUI even if she or he hadn&#39;t smoked in weeks.</p><p>As a result, it gets difficult to even understand how risky blazed driving is. Traffic studies that rely on blood THC measures could also be inaccurate if blood is drawn too late and THC has already left the system. And some state traffic databases, including Colorado&#39;s, according to state traffic officials, link accidents to 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC, a byproduct of marijuana metabolism that marks only recent exposure and not intoxication. That might result in an overestimation of marijuana-related accidents.</p><p>In the meantime, Haney says, the challenge shouldn&#39;t deter people from trying to find a marijuana DUI solution. People are working on breath tests, saliva, other blood markers and behavioral tests, just nothing that so far has stuck, she says. &quot;We need something, because it&#39;s an important public health issue. But how we&#39;re going to get there? I just don&#39;t know.&quot;</p><p><a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/02/09/466147956/why-its-so-hard-to-make-a-solid-test-for-driving-while-stoned?ft=nprml&amp;f=466147956"><em>&mdash; via NPR</em></a></p></p> Tue, 09 Feb 2016 12:52:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/why-it-so-hard-make-solid-test-driving-while-stoned-114775 Study Erred In Finding No Link Between Teen Pot Use And Psychosis http://www.wbez.org/news/study-erred-finding-no-link-between-teen-pot-use-and-psychosis-114552 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/smoking-weed_custom-a82c2177bbf91b8c3e7b71109034d6651fd1d921-s800-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A surprising study that found no connection between teen marijuana use and the risk of psychotic disorders is in error, the researchers said Wednesday.</p><p>When the results were published last August in a journal of the <em>American Psychological Association</em>, even the researchers said their findings were surprising. Over the past couple of decades, there have been at least 10 different epidemiological&nbsp;<a href="http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanpsy/article/PIIS2215-0366(14)00117-5/fulltext">studies</a>&nbsp;that found smoking marijuana increases risk for developing psychosis later in life.</p><p>The APA released a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2015/08/marijuana-use.aspx">statement</a>&nbsp;saying that the &quot;results from this study generated considerable controversy, including requests for supplemental analyses&quot; because most previous studies have found that chronic teen cannabis users might be more prone to health problems, including mental illnesses and physical illnesses like respiratory problems.</p><p>This study, published in<em>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/adb-adb0000103.pdf">Psychology of Addictive Behaviors</a></em>, originally found no connection between physical and mental problems in adults and smoking marijuana in their teen years.</p><p>Most of the studies on mental illness and weed, including this one, don&#39;t perfectly tease apart whether young adult cannabis use causes things like bipolar disorder or schizophrenia or if it&#39;s the other way around, says&nbsp;<a href="https://uwm.edu/psychology/people/krista-m-lisdahl/">Krista Lisdahl</a>, a clinical neuropsychologist at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee who was not involved in the study.</p><p>As we&#39;ve written in&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/03/06/390143641/pot-can-trigger-psychotic-symptoms-for-some-but-do-the-effects-last">Shots</a>&nbsp;before, people with emerging psychotic disorders could be more likely to use weed than others. &quot;Still, controlling for risk factors, marijuana does seem to increase the risk for psychotic disorders,&quot; Lisdahl says.</p><p>Once the researchers reanalyzed their data, they found that the men in the study who smoked weed as youngsters were more likely to have psychotic disorders, but still were not more likely to report any health problems than nonsmokers. The men are in their mid-30s, so it&#39;s still possible that an increased risk for problems that are more common in older folks, say heart disease or cancer, could appear in time.</p><p>It is curious that the researchers still didn&#39;t find a link between depression and weed smoking. This, too, has been connected in previous studies. If people with emerging psychotic disorders are more likely to use weed because they&#39;re trying to self-medicate, then you might imagine people with depression might do the same thing.</p><p>But Lisdahl says, it&#39;s really important to remember this study had about 400 men and no women. &quot;It&#39;s really important to not generalize this to female,&quot; she says. &quot;In my studies, the female marijuana users are the ones that really show increased depression and anxiety symptoms.&quot;</p><p>So, there are a few things that this study didn&#39;t examine, not to mention the wrong calculation around psychosis. The APA says the error is a statistical one. It could have come from a coding mistake when the authors analyzed the data, or it could be varying results from different statistical methods &ndash; the authors couldn&#39;t be reached for a comment at this time. In general, these mistakes are rare, but it also doesn&#39;t necessarily mean they&#39;re terrible researchers.</p><p>To the authors&#39; credit, they admitted a few limitations in the original manuscript. The APA press release states:</p><blockquote><div><p><em>The sample included young men who were using marijuana in the late 1990s and early 2000s and THC content has risen recently; data were obtained from self-reports; [statistical] power was low.</em></p></div></blockquote><p>The APA statement also says:</p><blockquote><div><p><em>The group difference on psychotic disorder approached statistical significance and would have been significant if a more liberal test (i.e., one-tailed) was utilized.</em></p></div></blockquote><p>So they knew that the results, particularly where psychotic disorders are concerned, were always in question, and explicitly said so. It also reveals another thing about science: results can change quite a bit depending on what statistical method you use to evaluate a small data set.</p><p><a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/01/21/463841177/study-erred-in-finding-no-link-between-teen-pot-use-and-psychosis?ft=nprml&amp;f=463841177" target="_blank"><em>&mdash;via NPR</em></a></p></p> Thu, 21 Jan 2016 14:43:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/study-erred-finding-no-link-between-teen-pot-use-and-psychosis-114552 Medical marijuana makes its Illinois debut http://www.wbez.org/news/medical-marijuana-makes-its-illinois-debut-113693 <p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/marijuana%20shipping.JPG" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="Marijuana continues to grow inside the greenhouse at the Pharmacannis Hillcrest facility. (WBEZ/Susie An)" /></p><p>About 3,300 patients with state-issued ID cards will be able to legally buy medical marijuana for the first time on Monday in Illinois.</p><p>Only eight dispensaries have been approved to sell, and even fewer cultivation centers will be delivering the product to those shops. But the state claims that by the end of the year, 20 to 25 dispensaries could be online.</p><p><a href="http://www.pharmacannis.com/" target="_blank">PharmaCannis</a> has licenses for four dispensaries and two cultivation centers. Its facility in Hillcrest, about 85 miles west of Chicago, is set back off the main road, among miles of cornfields.</p><p>John Leja is co-Chief Executive Officer of PharmaCannis. He said they&rsquo;re close to making their first marijuana harvest, but their crop won&rsquo;t be among the first batch.</p><p>&ldquo;I think we&rsquo;re in the final mode of testing the system and turning things on,&rdquo; Leja said.</p><p>While the company finishes up the office space of its cultivation center, Leja said plants are growing tall in its greenhouse, already in operation.</p><p>&ldquo;So within there we have plants that are being cloned in order to propagate up to sufficient quantities for reproduction,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>After marijuana is harvested and dried, a state-approved, independent lab will inspect and sign off on the product. From there, the cultivation center will package and label the product and ship it out to dispensaries for sale -- using two employees certified to transport and following required tracking regulations.</p><p>Leja said PharmaCannis isn&rsquo;t growing at full capacity at Hillcrest or its Dwight cultivation center just yet.</p><p>&ldquo;Given where the state is at with patient counts, we don&rsquo;t want to have excess capacity or inventory on hand,&rdquo; he said.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/marijuana%20shipping%202.JPG" style="height: 225px; width: 300px; float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" title="(WBEZ/Susie An)" />That&rsquo;s true for a number of growers in the state: At last count, about 3,300 patients had received their medical cannabis ID cards. While that&rsquo;s way below initial estimates, Illinois already has thousands more patients than its Midwest medical marijuana neighbor.</p><p>Jennifer Brooks is a reporter for the <em>Minneapolis Star Tribune</em>. She said if folks think the restrictions for Illinois&#39; are tight, they should take a look at Minnesota.</p><p>&ldquo;What I should have been paying attention to was that there only three patients waiting to get in at that time,&rdquo; said Brooks, recalling the opening of the <a href="http://www.kare11.com/story/news/health/2015/06/26/medical-marijuana-kingsley-minnesota-medical-solutions/29359657/" target="_blank">first dispensary in Minnesota this summer</a>.</p><p>Minnesota&rsquo;s program is so restrictive that only about 660 patients are approved to buy marijuana, out of an estimated 5,000 patients. Only three dispensaries have been green-lit to open their doors -- but Minnesota law allows for eight facilities.</p><p>&ldquo;Neither of these companies has been able to turn a profit at pot, which everyone would&rsquo;ve thought was impossible,&rdquo; Brooks explained.</p><p>Quite the contrast to Colorado, where legal pot is projected to be a $1 billion industry by 2016. Right now, only nine <a href="http://www.health.state.mn.us/topics/cannabis/patients/conditions.html" target="_blank">illnesses are approved for Minnesota</a>. Brooks said stakeholders in Minnesota hope the state will loosen its leash, and that more patients will enroll because, she explained anecdotally, it&rsquo;s brought physical relief and peace of mind to those who are buying bud.</p><p>&ldquo;Once they get more patients, they can bring down the price of medicine. Which at the moment is selling for anywhere from double the price of street value to eight times the price of street value, depending on the patients,&rdquo; Brooks said.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/5457588964_24bf65a9a0_b.jpg" style="height: 199px; width: 300px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: left;" title="Blackberry Kush, Indica. (flickr/Dank Depot)" /><a href="http://www.illinois.gov/gov/mcpp/Documents/DPH%20FAQ%20080814.pdf" target="_blank">In Illinois patients are limited</a> to buying two-and-a-half ounces of dry marijuana bud in a 14-day period. But Leja said the state still has to work out what that means for products like oils and edibles.</p><p>&ldquo;These are all new questions. They seem, not that they&rsquo;re so hard, but I think people have to make decisions as they see what the landscape looks like,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Leja and his team are putting the final touches on their dispensary in Evanston, the last of their four stores. Once it&rsquo;s up and running, product will be securely delivered to the facility. Only patients or caregivers with marijuana ID cards will be allowed to enter.</p><p>What those patients will pay is still unknown, but wholesale prices are expected to range from $3,000 to $4,500 per pound.</p><p>It could be weeks, or even months, before there&rsquo;s a more accurate picture of<a href="http://www.idfpr.com/Forms/MC/ListofLicensedDispensaries.pdf" target="_blank"> Illinois&rsquo; budding marijuana market.</a></p><p>The state&rsquo;s pilot program was implemented in 2014, but dispensaries haven&rsquo;t been able to put out their product until now. And the program is set to sunset at the end of 2017.</p><p><em>Clarification: In an earlier version of this story, WBEZ reported eight dispensaries were ready to sell. Eight have been approved by the state to sell but only five opened Monday.</em></p><p><em>Susie An is a WBEZ reporter. Follow her<a href="http://twitter.com/soosieon"> @soosieon</a>.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 09 Nov 2015 09:37:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/medical-marijuana-makes-its-illinois-debut-113693 Voters weigh in on marijuana, anti-discrimination ordinance, AirBnb http://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-11-04/voters-weigh-marijuana-anti-discrimination-ordinance-airbnb-113644 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Signs showing support for Proposition F are posted on a shop window in San Francisco, California on November 2, 2015. The measure failed..jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="attachment_95516"><img alt="Signs showing support for Proposition F are posted on a shop window in San Francisco, California on November 2, 2015. The measure failed. (Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images)" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.wbur.org/wordpress/11/files/2015/11/1104_sf-airbnb-624x396.jpg" style="height: 393px; width: 620px;" title="Signs showing support for Proposition F are posted on a shop window in San Francisco, California on November 2, 2015. The measure failed. (Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images)" /></div><p>A round-table of reporters joins<em>&nbsp;<a href="http://hereandnow.wbur.org/">Here &amp; Now</a></em>&nbsp;hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson to discuss the outcomes of several high-profile local elections.</p><p><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/houston-voters-reject-closely-watched-equal-rights-ordinance-113633" target="_blank">Anti-Discrimination Ordinance Fails in Houston</a></strong></p><p>In Houston, voters defeated an anti-discrimination ordinance that became known as the &lsquo;bathroom ordinance&rsquo; because critics campaigning against it claimed that it would have allowed &ldquo;troubled men&rdquo; to&nbsp;enter&nbsp;women&rsquo;s bathrooms.</p><p>Craig Cohen, host of Houston Matters, says the ordinance had no such language, and provided legal relief&nbsp;to 15 protected classes. He says similar ordinances exist in other major Texas cities.</p><div><blockquote><p><em>It all comes down to voter turnout in local, non-presidential elections. They do tend to favor more conservative voters, or&nbsp;those that are more passionate or emotional about an issue.</em></p><div><em>&ndash; Craig Cohen</em></div></blockquote></div><p>&ldquo;It all comes down to voter turnout in local, non-presidential elections. They do tend to favor more conservative voters, or&nbsp;those that are more passionate or emotional about an issue,&rdquo; Cohen said. &ldquo;This was decided by only about 12 percent of the population of the City of Houston.&rdquo;</p><p><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/state-ballot-initiatives-animal-trafficking-marijuana-legalization-113636" target="_blank">Ohio Voters Reject Marijuana Monopoly</a></strong></p><p>In Ohio, voters rejected an initiative that would have legalized marijuana but restricted commercial growing operations to some of the initiative&rsquo;s wealthy donors.</p><p>Jo Ingles, a reporter at&nbsp;Ohio Public Radio and TV,&nbsp;says the ballot question would have given already-determined investors ten growing sites, with exclusive ability to provide marijuana for the first four years of its implementation.</p><p>Ingles says polls show Ohio voters favor medical marijuana legalization, and lawmakers are responding.</p><p>&ldquo;The Speaker of the Ohio House wants the federal government to change marijuana so that it is no longer a Schedule I drug, and he&rsquo;s also talking about the legislature starting a pilot program that might lead up to medical marijuana soon,&rdquo; Ingles says.</p><p><a href="http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/10/27/san-francisco-airbnb-prop-f" target="_blank"><strong>Airbnb Wins in San Francisco</strong></a></p><p>And in San Francisco, voters decided against imposing restrictions on&nbsp;the popular room-rental site Airbnb.</p><p>But KQED&rsquo;s&nbsp;Guy Marzorati&nbsp;says this by no means spells the end of the debate over short-term rentals.</p><p>&ldquo;I wouldn&rsquo;t be surprised if opponents of the law on the Board of Supervisors try to make revisions to the law next year,&rdquo; Marzorati said. &ldquo;For Airbnb, they&rsquo;re going to keep operating, as usual, and work with cities to hash out tax agreements so that they can at least remit local hotel taxes, give revenues to city. But politically, I think life is going to get harder for opponents of short-term rentals. Airbnb showed in this campaign they are willing to spend millions to fight measures they don&rsquo;t like.&rdquo;</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/11/04/local-election-results" target="_blank"><em>via Here &amp; Now</em></a></p></p> Wed, 04 Nov 2015 16:02:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-11-04/voters-weigh-marijuana-anti-discrimination-ordinance-airbnb-113644 State ballot initiatives: from animal trafficking to marijuana legalization http://www.wbez.org/news/state-ballot-initiatives-animal-trafficking-marijuana-legalization-113636 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/1103_ohio-voting-624x410.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="attachment_95443"><img alt="A voter casts his ballot at Orange High School in Moreland Hills, Ohio on Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015. (Tony Dejak/AP)" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.wbur.org/wordpress/11/files/2015/11/1103_ohio-voting-624x410.jpg" style="height: 407px; width: 620px;" title="A voter casts his ballot at Orange High School in Moreland Hills, Ohio on Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015. (Tony Dejak/AP)" /><p>On this off-year election, voters in a number of states will decide on ballot initiatives.</p></div><p>In&nbsp;<a href="http://www.thepostathens.com/news/ohio-s-marijuana-legalization-ballot-issue-could-cause-legal-clash/article_10c4dcc4-80db-11e5-8645-33bff0634486.html" target="_blank">Ohio</a>, the legalization of marijuana is at stake. In&nbsp;<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/02/us/washington-state-weighs-far-reaching-law-on-animal-trafficking.html" target="_blank">Washington State</a>, the trafficking of animal products from endangered species, and in&nbsp;<a href="http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/mississippi-voters-decide-schools-funded/" target="_blank">Mississippi</a>, how public schools are funded.</p><p><a href="https://twitter.com/underhillwendy" target="_blank">Wendy Underhill</a>, program manager for elections at the <a href="http://www.ncsl.org/" target="_blank">National Conference of State Legislatures</a>, joins&nbsp;<em>Here &amp; Now&#39;s</em> Robin Young to take a look at state ballot initiatives.</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/11/03/state-ballot-initiatives" target="_blank"><em>via Here &amp; Now</em></a></p></p> Wed, 04 Nov 2015 12:56:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/state-ballot-initiatives-animal-trafficking-marijuana-legalization-113636 Week in Review: Second inauguration, millionaire tax bill and Wrigleyville rooftops http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-22/week-review-second-inauguration-millionaire-tax-bill-and <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/4515317493_812fb5efcb_z.jpg" style="height: 374px; width: 620px;" title="(Photo: Flickr/ohn W. Iwanski)" /></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206765596&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Week in Review: Second inauguration, millionaire tax bill, and Wrigleyville rooftops</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">We wrap up this w<span id="docs-internal-guid-12bd10bb-7d99-9bf6-40f3-9cf59a8124b3">We dig into the week&rsquo;s headlines including Mayor Emanuel&rsquo;s second inauguration; the end of the millionaire tax bill in Springfield; plus, Cubs owners&rsquo; acquisition of three more Wrigleyville rooftops. Our panelists are Kristin McQueary from the Chicago Tribune Editorial Board and Susy Schultz, president of the Community Media Workshop. </span><br /><br /><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li><em><a href="https://twitter.com/statehousechick">Kristin McQueary</a> is on the Chicago Tribune&rsquo;s Editorial Board.</em></li><li><em><a href="https://twitter.com/Susys">Susy Schultz</a> is president of the Community Media Workshop.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206765586&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Friday Mini-Mix featuring DJ Bizzon</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Every Friday we bring you a brand new mix from the Vocalo DJ Collective, curated by DJ Jesse De La Pena. Today&rsquo;s set comes from DJ Bizzon and features funk remixes.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-12bd10bb-7d9b-18a5-d007-26370faedd2d">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/djbizzon">DJ Bizzon</a> is a Milwaukee-based DJ.</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206768058&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Blackhawks battle against the Ducks, White Sox retire number 14</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-12bd10bb-7d9d-4a4a-73fd-ed54c71200f5">The Blackhawks took a tough loss Thursday night against the Ducks at the United Center, the White Sox expect a sold out house Saturday as they retire Paul Konerko&rsquo;s jersey, and this young Cubs team seems to be firing on all cylinders. Joining us to talk Chicago sports is WBEZ sports contributor Cheryl Raye-Stout.</span><br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong><em> <a href="https://twitter.com/Crayestout">Cheryl Raye-Stout</a> is WBEZ sports contributor.</em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206768190&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">How to deal with being stuck at Chicago airports</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr">Summer is coming and many of us are planning our vacations. While the vacation itself &nbsp;fun and exciting, dealing with flight delays before you get there can drain that enthusiasm pretty quickly. Especially at our airports - since O&rsquo;Hare and Midway both sit at the absolute bottom of the list for on-time departures. Chicago Magazine recently published a guide to help deal with those annoying delays and kill time. Rachel Bertsche is the author of that guide and she joins us with details.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-12bd10bb-7d9e-cfb6-03a8-465ff237d316">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/rberch?lang=en">Rachel Bertsche</a> is a Chicago-based writer and author.<span>&nbsp;</span></em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206769018&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Tech Shift Week in Review: Everpurse, tech efforts in healthcare, and the Apple Watch</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-12bd10bb-7da1-a39b-2e01-cfa5ea638d2c">Questions about 1871&rsquo;s success - a big win for local company Everpurse - and Washington&rsquo;s working on helping modernize health care technology. It&rsquo;s Tech Shift Week in review.</span><br /><br /><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-12bd10bb-7da1-a39b-2e01-cfa5ea638d2c"><a href="https://twitter.com/scollens">Steven Collens</a></span> is CEO of Matter Incubator.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-12bd10bb-7da1-a39b-2e01-cfa5ea638d2c"><a href="https://twitter.com/ScottVold">Scott Vold</a></span> is CEO and CoFounder of Fibroblast.&nbsp;</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206768319&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Parts of Chicago&#39;s Riverwalk set to open</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-12bd10bb-7da2-edc5-32f8-aaafe93f37e4">The first two blocks of Chicago&rsquo;s new Riverwalk opens May 23. The $100 million extension plan was announced back in 2012, and will eventually include six blocks of the riverfront. Joining us for more on the commercial development of the Riverwalk is Michelle Woods from Chicago&rsquo;s Department of Fleet and Facility. </span><br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/micwoods312">Michelle Woods</a> is project manager at Chicago&rsquo;s Department of Fleet and Facility.</em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206768504&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Memorial Day weekend weather forecast</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-12bd10bb-7da3-f2b2-3a7a-4f81727f8431">Want to know what you can expect weather-wise this Memorial Day Weekend? Gilbert Sebenste, meteorologist at Northern Illinois University, has you covered. </span><br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/Gilbert_S?lang=en">Gilbert Sebentse</a> is a meteorologist at Northern Illinois University.</em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206768657&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Memorial Day weekend traffic update</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-12bd10bb-7da5-1360-befc-e8c480d0c2c6">Heading out of town for the weekend? Triple-A Chicago estimates that 1.7 million people in Illinois will take a road trip over Memorial Day weekend. That&rsquo;s more than a five percent increase over last year. WBEZ traffic reporter Sarah Engle joins us with an extended look at the roads.</span><br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/SarahEngelWBEZ">Sarah Engle</a> is a WBEZ traffic reporter.</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 22 May 2015 16:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-22/week-review-second-inauguration-millionaire-tax-bill-and Illinois medical marijuana approved for PTSD, osteoarthritis http://www.wbez.org/news/illinois-medical-marijuana-approved-ptsd-osteoarthritis-111985 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP366129178406 (2)_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>An Illinois advisory board has voted to recommend that post-traumatic stress disorder among military veterans be added to the list of qualifying conditions in the state&#39;s medical marijuana program.</p><p>Board member Jim Champion, who&#39;s a military veteran, announced the unanimous decision of the board Monday, saying he was &quot;very, very proud.&quot; The recommendation now goes to the Illinois Department of Public Health.</p><p>The decision at a public hearing in Chicago was among several votes Monday on various conditions submitted by public petition. Board members earlier voted against adding diabetes and anxiety to the list. They said anxiety was too broad, but left open the possibility of adding severe anxiety in the future.</p><p>The board also voted to approve osteoarthritis.</p><p>The board includes patients, nurses, doctors and a pharmacist.</p></p> Mon, 04 May 2015 17:23:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/illinois-medical-marijuana-approved-ptsd-osteoarthritis-111985 Illinois lawmakers call for pot task force http://www.wbez.org/news/illinois-lawmakers-call-pot-task-force-110091 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Marijuana Arrests.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>As the state of Illinois drafts rules for medical marijuana, Cook County Commissioner John Fritchey wants lawmakers to open up the discussion for recreational pot use.</p><p>Fritchey&#39;s proposing the state legislature form a task force as a first step toward full legalization.</p><p>&ldquo;We can find a way to do this and look at what other states have done, and cherry pick the good ideas, dismiss the bad ideas and find a workable policy that recognizes what we&rsquo;re doing now simply isn&rsquo;t right,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Fritchey was joined by State Representatives Kelly Cassidy (D-Chicago), Christian Mitchell (D-Chicago) and Mike Zalewski (D-Riverside) who looked to Colorado and Washington, states that have already legalized recreational pot use.</p><p>Colorado officials anticipate generating about $184 million in tax revenue in the first 18 months of legalized sale. That&rsquo;s an attractive figure for some lawmakers of the cash strapped state of Illinois.</p><p>Some critics say legalizing pot would open the door to greater substance abuse, especially among teens.</p><p>Fritchey said regulation would address such concerns. He noted at least some portion of legalization or decriminalization would put less of a strain on resources for public safety.</p><p>&ldquo;Marijuana usage among racial categories is essentially the same,&rdquo; Fritchey said.&nbsp; &ldquo;The disparity in Chicago and Cook County is overwhelmingly disproportionate toward African-Americans and Latinos being arrested for simple possession.&rdquo;</p><p>During the press conference, lawmakers were asked if they would try pot if it were legalized. After a second of nervous laughter, Fritchey said a hesitation to answer the question reveals that the topic needs more discussion; people aren&rsquo;t comfortable talking about it.</p><p>Fritchey recognized it would be some time before any legislation is introduced.</p><p>In February, State Representative Robyn Gabel (D-Evanston) introduced a bill calling for the state to study recreational cannabis. It now sits in committee.</p><p><em>Susie An is WBEZ&rsquo;s business reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/soosieon">@soosieon</a>.</em></p></p> Tue, 29 Apr 2014 07:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/illinois-lawmakers-call-pot-task-force-110091 Morning Shift: The good, bad and ugly of unemployment numbers throughout Illinois http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-17/morning-shift-good-bad-and-ugly-unemployment-numbers <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Unemployment Flickr Tax Credits.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We look at the latest job numbers for Illinois and what towns have the highest unemployment. Also, the music of Sondheim - we get a visit from the cast of the Shakespeare Theater&#39;s production of Road Show.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-good-bad-and-ugly-of-unemploymen/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-good-bad-and-ugly-of-unemploymen.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-good-bad-and-ugly-of-unemploymen" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: The good, bad and ugly of unemployment numbers throughout Illinois" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Thu, 17 Apr 2014 08:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-17/morning-shift-good-bad-and-ugly-unemployment-numbers Can you lose weight on the marijuana diet? http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/can-you-lose-weight-marijuana-diet-108996 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Marijuana Diet.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">The <a href="http://themarijuanadiet.org/">&quot;marijuana diet&quot;</a> may sound like something you&#39;d read about in The Onion. But for its creator, the diet is no joke.</p><p dir="ltr">Art Glass, 66, whose background is in marketing and advertising, says he ballooned up to 345 pounds years ago but returned to a healthy weight by following the tenets of his self-styled strategy, which includes light to moderate smoking but also a healthy diet. <a href="https://soundcloud.com/morningshiftwbez/eat-this-author-offers">He talked about it on WBEZ&rsquo;s Morning Shift Wednesday.</a></p><p dir="ltr">Glass&rsquo;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/The-Marijuana-Diet-Anonymous-1-ebook/dp/B00EP0UUGA"> e-book &ldquo;The Marijuana Diet&rdquo; &nbsp;went up on Amazon</a> this week and prescribes lots of fresh fruits, vegetables, sprouts and nuts along with occasional fasting and superfood smoothies. It further recommends modest amounts of high-quality pastured and grass-fed animal protein, and the elimination of processed foods, white sugar and flour.</p><p dir="ltr">This alone might be enough to improve a dieter&#39;s health, but Glass also suggests regular exercises--mostly long-held poses that can be done on a chair, a couch or standing.</p><p dir="ltr">So is the marijuana aspect of the diet really that crucial? &nbsp;Maybe not for some.</p><p dir="ltr">But for those whose unhealthy eating habits stem from psychological or emotional issues, Glass believes smoking can help them explore the triggers or experiences that have led to their self-destructive behavior.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Losing weight is one of the most challenging things there is,&rdquo; Glass said on the Morning Shift Wednesday. &nbsp;&ldquo;Marijuana helps you get in touch with yourself and let go of the crap you don&rsquo;t need and when you let go of that psychological crap, you will let go of your weight.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Glass uses his own experience as evidence and, in his book, catalogues more than 100 testimonials from Internet users who also report pot-induced weight loss. Their screen names include &ldquo;stonerchick609&rdquo; or &ldquo;smotpoker&rdquo;.</p><p dir="ltr">But he also cites peer reviewed studies that show correlations between pot smoking (among adults) and better metabolic health.</p><p dir="ltr">One <a href="http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2011/08/24/aje.kwr200.abstract">2011 study that appeared in the American Journal of Epidemiology</a> looked at two large populations of American adults and found obesity rates of 22 percent and 25.3 percent among non-marijuana smokers but only 14.3 percent and 17.2 percent among marijuana smokers, even when researchers controlled for other factors.</p><p dir="ltr">Another <a href="http://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343%2813%2900200-3/abstract">2013 study that appeared in the American Journal of Medicine</a> showed lower insulin levels and waist circumference (an indicator of dangerous visceral fat) among regular pot smokers.</p><p dir="ltr">Still, for Dr. Rasa Kazlauskaite, who is the Acting Medical Director at Rush University and a researcher of &nbsp;cannabinoids, these studies show association not causation. In other words, she thinks that the better health could be linked to other factors.</p><p dir="ltr">She also points out what munchie sufferers know well: that marijuana has been traditionally associated with appetite stimulation and increased food consumption rather than appetite suppression. She points to the drug rimonabant that aided weight loss by blocking human cannabinoid (marijuana) receptors--it was later withdrawn from the market due to dangerous side effects.</p><p dir="ltr">Glass says that he&rsquo;s no stranger to the munchies but suggests combating them by taking no more than three tokes per smoking session, smoking alone and never eating while under the influence. &nbsp;He recommends using that time for exercise and self-guided reflections on the root causes of one&rsquo;s unhealthy behavior.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;It sounds like the author is recommending self-treatment, being your own psychologist,&rdquo; Kazlauskaite said. &ldquo;For some people it might work but others might benefit from guidance. I would recommend meeting with a behavioral specialist who specializes in therapy for obesity.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Kazlauskaite, however, agrees with some of Glass&rsquo; nutritional advice, especially his emphasis on fresh fruits and vegetables and the removal of sugar and processed foods.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Some of these recommendations are really desirable changes for people who want to lose weight or maintain a lighter weight,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;So if someone smokes marijuana but also makes better meal and snack choices then that is better than not making healthy nutritional decisions at all. But it might be that without smoking marijuana people might lose more weight. If someone wants to test this hypothesis the ideal study would be to compare diet alone with diet and marijuana.&rdquo; &nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p><em>Monica Eng &nbsp;is a WBEZ producer. Follow her <a href="http://twitter.com/monicaeng" target="_blank">@monicaeng</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 23 Oct 2013 17:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/can-you-lose-weight-marijuana-diet-108996