WBEZ | conflict minerals http://www.wbez.org/tags/conflict-minerals Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Minerals in Congo used to make handheld devices fuel deadly conflict http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-09-20/minerals-congo-used-make-handheld-devices-fuel-deadly-conflict-92225 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-September/2011-09-20/congo1.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>MP3 players, smart phones and tablet computers have transformed the way many of us live and work. To make these gadgets, companies like Apple&nbsp; rely on certain minerals, many of which come from Eastern Congo. High demand has driven up the prices of these resources, and the resulting struggle to control them has turned bloody, leaving hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians dead.</p><p>The U.S. Congress is attempting to address the problem. Their solution is tucked into the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, and it requires companies that source minerals from places like Eastern Congo to make their supply chains transparent. The Security and Exchange Commission is currently finalizing the regulations for this provision.</p><p>We discuss this legislation with <a href="http://www.enoughproject.org/content/aaron-hall-project-analyst" target="_blank">Aaron Hall</a>, a policy analyst with <a href="http://www.enoughproject.org/" target="_blank">The Enough Project</a>. He tells us how we, as ordinary consumers, can better grasp the issue of conflict minerals.</p></p> Tue, 20 Sep 2011 16:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-09-20/minerals-congo-used-make-handheld-devices-fuel-deadly-conflict-92225 Worldview 9.20.11 http://www.wbez.org/episode/worldview-92011 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/episode/images/2011-september/2011-09-20/ncds1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>This week, the United Nations is hosting its first ever <a href="http://www.un.org/en/ga/ncdmeeting2011/" target="_blank">high-level meeting</a> to tackle non-communicable diseases, such as heart and lung disease, cancer and diabetes. <a href="http://www.worldlungfoundation.org/ht/d/sp/a/GetDocumentAction/i/7823" target="_blank">Dr. Judith Mackay</a>, an expert on international health policy who <em>Time</em> named one of the most influential people in the world, is attending the talks. She tells us what governments can do to give their citizens a better chance at life-long health. Also, the struggle to control Congo's natural resources, which include minerals needed to make laptop computers, MP3 players and countless other electronic devices, has fueled the world's deadliest conflict since World War II. We speak with <a href="http://www.enoughproject.org/content/aaron-hall-project-analyst" target="_blank">Aaron Hall</a>, a policy analyst with <a href="http://www.enoughproject.org/" target="_blank">The Enough Project</a>, about efforts to make the mineral supply chains in Congo transparent.</p></p> Tue, 20 Sep 2011 15:41:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode/worldview-92011