WBEZ | Ethics Moment http://www.wbez.org/tags/ethics-moment Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en When to forgive? http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-07/when-forgive-101213 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/james%20holmes%20colorado%20AP.jpg" title="Al Gini argues that criminals like accused Colorado shooter James Holmes are beyond society’s forgiveness. But what about other wrong-doers? (AP/Denver Post, RJ Sangosti, Pool)" /></div><p>On February 27, 1993, 14-year-old Greg Ousley went into his parents&rsquo; bedroom at 11:30 p.m. and shot them point blank with a 12-gague shotgun. He then called the police and said that he had just come home and found them murdered. It didn&rsquo;t take the sheriff&rsquo;s office in Warsaw, Ind., long to poke holes in his story. Ousley confessed and explained himself by saying: &ldquo;They don&rsquo;t seem to understand me&hellip;.I&rsquo;ve been thinking about killing them every time I get mad.&rdquo; Because Ousley admitted to planning the murder, the state tried him as an adult and sentenced him to 60 years in prison.</p><p>For the last 19 years Ousley has been trying to better understand why he killed his parents. (The <em>New York Times Magazine</em> ran <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/22/magazine/greg-ousley-is-sorry-for-killing-his-parents-is-that-enough.html?_r=1&amp;partner=rss&amp;emc=rss">a cover story about Ousley</a> last week, which included excerpts of <a href="http://6thfloor.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/20/in-greg-ousleys-words/">a 40-page, hand-written essay</a>&nbsp;a 19-year-old Ousley wrote about his crime.) He still doesn&rsquo;t know exactly why he did what he did; but, he knows he did it and he accepts full responsibility for it. Ousley is quick to point out, however, that now he&rsquo;s not &ldquo;that crazy 14-year-old kid anymore.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m a 35-year-old-man and I&rsquo;m different now,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>That seems to be the case. While in prison, Ousley has done everything possible to change himself. He finished high school, graduated with honors for college, took years of anger management and self-improvement classes. He has worked in the warden&rsquo;s office and is trusted by the prison staff. The bottom line seems clear: Greg Ousley is not the same person that he was. He has paid a stiff penalty. He wants to help other kids avoid the anger and confusion that drove him to commit murder. Now, he wants to be free. He feels he has redeemed himself and that he should be forgiven. I for one think he&rsquo;s right.</p><p>But can we, as a society, ever forgive the behavior of such individuals as sexual predator Jerry Sandusky, the Batman terrorist James Holmes (12 people killed and 58 wounded) or the Norwegian white supremacist Anders Behring Breivik (77 dead and 319 wounded)? I don&rsquo;t think so. Given the immensity of their actions, I think forgiveness is asking too much.</p><p>Beyond forgiveness and redemption, what we need to do as a society is try to understand the motivations behind their behavior. Truman Capote, author of <em>In Cold Blood,</em> argued that to simply execute murderers or to put them away forever gains us nothing as a society. We need to study these people. And perhaps, said Capote, after years of studying different madmen and murderers we might come up with some answers.</p><p>Unlike Greg Ousley, there is nothing that Sandusky, Holmes or Breivik can do to reinvent themselves as human beings. Their actions are beyond redemption. But we must learn from them, so that in the future we can try and stop the behavior of others like them.</p><p><em>Al Gini is a Professor of Business Ethics and Chairman of the Management Department in the Quinlan School of Business at Loyola University Chicago.</em></p></p> Thu, 26 Jul 2012 12:24:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-07/when-forgive-101213 ‘Presidents Club’ offers council for loneliest leader in the land http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-07/%E2%80%98presidents-club%E2%80%99-offers-council-loneliest-leader-land-101032 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/presidents%20club%20AP.jpg" title="Barack Obama is welcomed into the ‘Presidents Club’ by former presidents George W. Bush, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter. (AP/J. Scott Applewhite)" /></div><p>Why would former campaign rivals and political enemies &mdash; still jockeying to secure their place in history &mdash; join a club in order to be of real help to each other?</p><p>That&rsquo;s the central question raised by <em>The Presidents Club, </em>Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duff&rsquo;s book about the impact and import of the world&rsquo;s most exclusive fraternity. With the presidential campaign about to shift into high gear, I picked up a copy. It turns out the answer to my question is political and practical, but also very human and personal.</p><p>The authors claim these men have endured experiences and decisions that few executives have ever dealt with. Moreover, the authors argue that, in the modern world, a President&rsquo;s decisions and actions are global, not simply national in their impact and importance. Bottom line: They need each other for council and advice &mdash; even a shoulder to cry on.</p><p>John F. Kennedy captured this issue succinctly after just ten days on the job. &ldquo;No man entering upon their office could fail to be staggered upon learning&hellip;the harsh enormity of the trials through which we must pass in the next four years,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Each day the crises multiply. Each day their solution grows more difficult.&rdquo; Former senator and presidential candidate Gary Hart once suggested that presidents wind up governing a country and dealing with problems that they never expected to handle. No one is ever prepared for the job; everyone in the job needs help.</p><p>Political analyst James Fallows has argued that no president is perfect, and that every president is bound to fail in various crucial aspects of their job. That&rsquo;s why presidents need to be open to the insights and experiences of others who have been there before them. Machiavelli once said that the successful prince must be a student of history to succeed as a leader. Gibbs and Duffy argue that the &ldquo;Presidents Club&rdquo; is a way to learn history by seeking refuge, respite and advice from others who have shared the office and understand the issues. &ldquo;The Club of Presidents&rdquo; is an attempt to overcome the great paradox of the presidency: It is simultaneously the most public and yet the loneliest office in the land.</p><p><em>Al Gini is a Professor of Business Ethics and chairman of the Management Department in the Quinlan School of Business at Loyola University Chicago.</em></p></p> Thu, 19 Jul 2012 11:48:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-07/%E2%80%98presidents-club%E2%80%99-offers-council-loneliest-leader-land-101032 Is college worth the cost? http://www.wbez.org/blog/bez/2012-03-01/college-worth-cost-96602 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/photo/2012-February/2012-02-21/Grad Caps_John Walker.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>With tuition hikes, compounding student loans, and scarce entry-level jobs, an increasing concern for high school graduates is whether college is worth the cost. &nbsp;</p><p>The value of college, however, runs deeper than potential post-graduation employment. Colleges and universities were designed for more than job training programs: They were designed to produce educated and informed citizens:</p><p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;<iframe allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/e3CASM5ofpc" width="560" frameborder="0" height="315"></iframe></p><p><em>Al Gini is a professor of business ethics and chair of the department of management at Loyola University Chicago. He is also the co-founder and associate editor of</em>&nbsp;Business Ethics Quarterly,&nbsp;<em>and the author of several books, including</em>&nbsp;My Job, My Self&nbsp;and&nbsp;Seeking the Truth of Things: Confessions of a (catholic) Philosopher.</p></p> Thu, 01 Mar 2012 12:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blog/bez/2012-03-01/college-worth-cost-96602 Ethics Moment: When it comes to leadership, one size does not fit all http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2012-02-02/ethics-moment-when-it-comes-leadership-one-size-does-not-fit-all-9598 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/photo/2012-February/2012-02-02/AP110603030658.jpg" alt="" /><p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2012-February/2012-02-02/AP110603030658.jpg" title="Vice President Nixon and Prime Minister Churchill shake hands in 1954. Nassir Ghaemi calls Churchill England’s 'man of the hour.' (AP/file)" width="512" height="403"></p><p>Peter Drucker once suggested that the true quality of leadership cannot be measured by eloquence, but rather by effectiveness. In general I agree, but the question remains: How do individual leaders achieve effectiveness?</p><p>Currently, Amazon.com lists more than 49,000 books with the word “leadership” in the title. All of them, one way or another, are trying to define and describe what effective leadership is about.</p><p>The truth is leadership cannot be easily defined, and, in fact, there is no universally agreed upon definition of great leadership. In fact, great leaders come in many guises, with mixed qualities, and possessing different skills, talents, and temperaments. The reality is that the qualities of a successful military leader may be inappropriate in times of peace. The qualities of a hard driving, Mike Ditka-type football coach may, in fact, be counterproductive in a corporate boardroom. Sometimes, leadership requires an outgoing, socially energizing, risk-taking extrovert. And at other times, the situation calls for a more deliberative, cautious, patient form of leadership.</p><p>In his recent book, <em>A First-Rate Madness</em>, Nassir Ghaemi argues that although there are a number of skills that are elemental to the leadership equation ---- intelligence, diligence, energy ---- in the end, the leader we need is, in, part dependent upon the particular circumstances facing the group being led, be it a nation, a company, a football team, etc.</p><p>For Ghaemi, it’s all about fit. In good, high growth times we want a Bill Clinton type leading us. We want an extrovert, a cheerleader, a crowd pleaser. We want a leader who exudes confidence, believes in himself/herself and believes in us. In troubling times, in time of reassessment, transition and introspection, we need a more introverted type of leadership. We need a person of reflection, judgment and caution. We need a careful risk-taker who listens to others, thinks things through carefully, and is more concerned about doing the right thing rather than being liked or loved by those being led.&nbsp;</p><p>For Ghaemi, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was the right President at the right time because fighting polio made him tough. He was resilient. He was not afraid of facing long odds. He knew victory was not possible without concerted effort. For Ghaemi, Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. were empathetic to the needs and sufferings of others because they too had suffered and understood the pain of prejudice and rejection.</p><p>For Ghaemi, Churchill was England’s “man of the hour,” because he was a realist, a historian, and a man of war. We understood that the price of victory was “blood, sweat, and tears.” He understood, before the world understood, that Hitler was not just England’s enemy, but the enemy of civilization itself.</p><p>And, yes it can be argued that perhaps “taciturn” Calvin Coolidge was the exact President we needed at the time because of his commitment to the belief that: “The business of America is business.”</p><p><em>Al Gini is a professor of business ethics and chair of the department of management at Loyola University Chicago. He is also the co-founder and associate editor of </em>Business Ethics Quarterly<em>, and the author of several books, including </em>My Job, My Self<em> and </em>Seeking the Truth of Things: Confessions of a (catholic) Philosopher<em>. </em></p></p> Thu, 02 Feb 2012 14:50:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2012-02-02/ethics-moment-when-it-comes-leadership-one-size-does-not-fit-all-9598 Ethics Moment: Satire, sanity and Stephen Colbert http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2012-01-17/ethics-moment-satire-sanity-and-laughter-95601 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/photo/2012-January/2012-01-24/Colbert.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The 2012 Republican presidential primaries witnessed the return of yet another 2008 contender: Stephen Colbert.</p><p>The Comedy Central host made a tardy (and <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/24/jon-stewart-rebuffs-stephen-colbert_n_1226091.html">satirical</a>) entrance to the race in South Carolina earlier this month, thanks, in part, to the support of his collegue Jon Stewart.&nbsp;</p><p>Together, the two used Colbert's candidacy - and their loyal fan base - to draw attention to the power and role so-called Super PACs play in American politics today.</p><p>But why are comedians like Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart so popular? Al Gini shares his thoughts:<br> &nbsp;</p><p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/T5c7Ejgj31w" frameborder="0" height="315" width="560"></iframe></p><p><em style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 19px; text-align: left; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Al Gini is a professor of business ethics and chair of the department of management at Loyola University Chicago. He is also the co-founder and associate editor of&nbsp;</em><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 19px; text-align: left; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Business Ethics Quarterly,</span><em style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 19px; text-align: left; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">and the author of several books, including</em><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 19px; text-align: left; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">&nbsp;My Job, My Self&nbsp;and&nbsp;Seeking the Truth of Things: Confessions of a (catholic) Philosopher.&nbsp;</span></p></p> Thu, 26 Jan 2012 14:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2012-01-17/ethics-moment-satire-sanity-and-laughter-95601 Does success in business equal success in politics? http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2012-01-24/does-success-business-equal-success-politics-95770 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/photo/2012-January/2012-01-24/AP111219122772.jpg" alt="" /><p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="caption" height="341" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2012-January/2012-01-24/romney biz.jpg" title="(AP/file)" width="512"></p><p>It's not uncommon for political candidates these days to tout their background in business as evidence of their skills to be an effective public servant.&nbsp; After all, managing budgets and running with complex organizations is a key part of modern governance.&nbsp;</p><p><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/13/opinion/brooks-the-ceo-in-politics.html">But in a recent column</a>, David Brooks of the <em>New York Times</em> asked one of the central questions at the heart of the present Republican primary campaign. To wit: Does success in business necessarily translate into success in politics, specifically the Presidency? Or, another way of putting it: Is success at making corporate profits the same as crafting good economic policy? Is running America like running a corporation?</p><p>In short, Brooks argues that there is no direct correlation between business success and political success. He has long maintained that successful political leadership has similar but deeper roots than that which is required for success in business.</p><p>Although success in business and politics requires talent and a large storehouse of technical and intellectual tools, politics is about the business and management of people, not just the business of assets and profit margins. Politics is about stewardship, being of help to others and not necessarily always competing with others. Politics should be about public duty and not just private ambition. Politics is always about others and not just self.<br> <br> Brooks suggests that historically successful Presidents have shared at least five similar characteristics and traits.</p><p>1. “Successful Presidents tend to me emotionally secure,” he writes. That is, they have a strong sense of self. They are honest with themselves. They know who they are. They know what they stand for. They possess a strong moral compass and can withstand “the criticism of the crowd.”<br> <br> 2. “They are infused with a sense of obligation and responsibility to perform public service.”<br> <br> 3. “Great Presidents tend to have superb political judgment. In his essay on the subject, Isaiah Berlin defines political judgment as a capacity for integrating a vast amalgam of constantly changing, multicolored, evanescent perpetually overlapping data.”<br> <br> 4. Great political leaders have often experienced crushing personal setbacks that have made them more sensitive to the needs and wants of others. For example, Lincoln’s depression or FDR’s polio made them sympathetic to the pain and frailty of others. And it also made them more aggressive in the face of hardship and suffering.<br> <br> 5. Finally, successful political leaders “tend to have an instrumental mentality. They do not feel the office is about them.” They are just a temporary instrument in service of a larger cause.</p><p>This is hardly an exhaustive list, but nevertheless, these five factors are worthy of serious consideration and reflection in this election year - and every other.</p></p> Tue, 24 Jan 2012 14:54:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2012-01-24/does-success-business-equal-success-politics-95770 Ethics Moment: Seven billion and counting http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2012-01-18/ethics-moment-seven-billion-and-counting-95592 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/photo/2012-January/2012-01-17/Crowd_JamesCridland_600.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>When Thomas Malthus published his essay on population in 1798, it would have been hard for him to imagine the accelerated increase in global&nbsp;population in the last century.</p><p>However, his theory connecting population with the land's yield is getting an update.&nbsp;</p><p>Al Gini looks at concerns of an increasing population in the modern world and recent findings that suggest our greatest concern is only six inches deep.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/taxtw5vv3p8" width="560" frameborder="0" height="315"></iframe></p><p><em style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 19px; text-align: left; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Al Gini is a professor of business ethics and chair of the department of management at Loyola University Chicago. He is also the co-founder and associate editor of&nbsp;</em><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 19px; text-align: left; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Business Ethics Quarterly,</span><em style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 19px; text-align: left; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">and the author of several books, including</em><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 19px; text-align: left; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">&nbsp;My Job, My Self&nbsp;and&nbsp;Seeking the Truth of Things: Confessions of a (catholic) Philosopher.&nbsp;</span></p></p> Wed, 18 Jan 2012 14:56:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2012-01-18/ethics-moment-seven-billion-and-counting-95592 Ethics Moment: Forging your own path in 2012 http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2011-12-27/ethics-moment-forging-your-own-path-2012-95166 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/photo/2011-December/2011-12-27/Clock face_Flickr_Jskl.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><img alt="" class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2011-December/2011-12-27/4839129091_1fe6072b5d.jpg" style="width: 311px; height: 206px; margin: 8px; float: left;" title="">Because it is the season for rebirth and reawakening, I have been thinking about something that Abraham Lincoln once said in a moment of utter despair:&nbsp; "I claim not to have controlled events, but confess plainly that events have controlled me."<br> <br> I think all of us wonder about how much real freedom we have in our lives.&nbsp; Are we truly free and able to make any choices we desire?&nbsp; Can we act without regard to others?&nbsp; Are we not influenced by events around us, luck and chance, and the limits of our abilities and talents?&nbsp; Of course we are, "No man is an island."&nbsp; We are not herd animals, but we are collective by nature.&nbsp; We need others to be, to think, to survive.&nbsp; The very word civilization comes from the Latin-to live with others, a public life, and an inhabitant of a city.</p><p>From my point of view the issue is not "our we controlled by events", but "how much are we controlled by events?"&nbsp; And I think the answer varies with the situation and the individuals involved.&nbsp; I also think that personal freedom, personal autonomy is never an all or nothing affair.</p><p>Freedom is not just simply about choices and options.&nbsp; I think it is equally about attitude and perspective.&nbsp; We can not always control the facts of fate, but we have the ability to control our attitude in regard to the facts and events in our lives.&nbsp; In other words, we may not have freedom "from" the conditions in life, but we have the freedom "to" take a stand in regard to the conditions that we face.</p><p>Another President, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, best articulated the ability to confront the world that is given to us, when he said in his first Inaugural Address that in regard to the Great Depression-"the only thing we have to fear is fear itself!"&nbsp; For Roosevelt, the Depression was unavoidably real, but it was not insurmountable.&nbsp; However, if we feared it, gave in to it, and gave up, we were doomed.</p><p>The power of positive thinking can not in itself cure cancer, make us rich and famous, or solve all the problems of the world-but, without it I am convinced our chances are dramatically diminished.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><em>Al Gini is a professor of business ethics and chair of the department of management at Loyola University Chicago. He is also the co-founder and associate editor of </em>Business Ethics Quarterly<em>, and the author of several books, including </em>My Job, My Self <em>and </em>Seeking the Truth of Things: Confessions of a (catholic) Philosopher<em>.</em><br> &nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 27 Dec 2011 19:34:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2011-12-27/ethics-moment-forging-your-own-path-2012-95166 Ethics Moment: Why Viktor Frankl's Man's Search for Meaning is the best book I've ever read http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2011-12-20/ethics-moment-why-viktor-frankls-mans-search-meaning-best-book-ive-ev <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/photo/2011-December/2011-12-21/Pile of Books_Flickr_Emily Carlin.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>As many know, Loyola University Chicago professor Al Gini is an avid reader.&nbsp; Just last week, in fact, he posted his annual, wide-ranging list of <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2011-12-06/christmas-book-bag-my-top-ten-books-2011-94643">Top 10 Books of the Year</a>. &nbsp;</p><p>It's chock full of fiction, non-fiction, mystery, memoir and all genres in between.&nbsp;</p><p>But what's his favorite book of all time?&nbsp;</p><p>As a reader and philosophy professor, Al has been presented with this question a lot.&nbsp;</p><p>And he’s found a fitting suggestion:</p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/OPW7QB2kuco" align="middle" width="560" frameborder="0" height="315" scrolling="no"></iframe></p><p><em>Al Gini is a professor of business ethics and chair of the department of management at Loyola University Chicago. He is also the co-founder and associate editor of</em>&nbsp;Business Ethics Quarterly<em>, and the author of several books, including</em>&nbsp;My Job, My Self&nbsp;<em>and</em>&nbsp;Seeking the Truth of Things: Confessions of a (catholic) Philosopher.</p></p> Tue, 20 Dec 2011 19:33:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2011-12-20/ethics-moment-why-viktor-frankls-mans-search-meaning-best-book-ive-ev Ethics Moment: I consume, therefore I am http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2011-12-14/ethics-moment-i-consume-therefore-i-am-94878 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/photo/2011-December/2011-12-14/black friday_flickr_steve rhodes.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Before the secret behind Santa was revealed to us by an older sibling or a loud-mouthed classmate, the magic of the holidays were untarnishable. Now, the season seems a little less jolly, focused mainly around getting the best deals to give the best presents that may cost more than we can afford.&nbsp;</p><p>Professor Al Gini confirms that holiday spending has become a critical measurement of national and global economic health. The majority of the year's retail sales will, in fact, happen within a month of Christmas. However, there are other aspects of the holidays that can be appreciated and enjoyed in the company of others.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/D2prdLwAvfg" width="560" frameborder="0" height="315"></iframe></p><p><em>Al Gini is a professor of business ethics and chair of the department of management at Loyola University Chicago. He is also the co-founder and associate editor of </em>Business Ethics Quarterly<em>, and the author of several books, including </em>My Job, My Self<em> and </em>Seeking the Truth of Things: Confessions of a (catholic) Philosopher.</p></p> Wed, 14 Dec 2011 15:28:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2011-12-14/ethics-moment-i-consume-therefore-i-am-94878