WBEZ | Belgium http://www.wbez.org/tags/belgium Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en How the NATO peoples helped settle Chicago, Part 3 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/john-r-schmidt/2012-05/how-nato-peoples-helped-settle-chicago-part-3-99036 <p><p>Today we conclude our capsule look at how peoples from the 28 NATO countries helped build Chicago.</p><p><strong>Belgium</strong>—As early as 1854, the government of Belgium identified 83 Belgians as living in the city of Chicago. What there was of a Belgian neighborhood in the city later developed in the few blocks around St. John Berchmans Catholic Church in Logan Square. Since the 1960s that concentration has dispersed.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Hungary-St.%20Stephen%20King_0.JPG" title="St. Stephen of Hungary Catholic Church--2015 W. Augusta Blvd."></div></div><p><strong>Germany—</strong>Germans were the first ethnic group to come to Chicago in great numbers. In 1850 one-sixth of the city’s population carried the “born in Germany” label. By 1900 a full 25% of Chicagoans were either first- or second-generation German.</p><p>They settled on the North Side and up the Lincoln Avenue corridor. They built churches, schools, social halls. They printed books and newspapers, and organized political clubs. They were determined to keep their culture. When one nativist mayor closed the saloons on Sunday, the city’s Germans rioted.</p><p>Then came World War I, and a national wave of anti-Germanism. The local Germans became more assimilated. Today, the Dank Haus in Lincoln Square serves as the city’s German-American cultural center. And along with the Irish and the Poles, Germans remain one of Chicago’s largest European ethnic groups. (Hey—those three are my ancestry!) &nbsp;</p><p><strong>Hungary</strong>—In 1890 there were fewer than 2,000 Hungarians living in Chicago. Within 30 years, that number had swelled to over 70,000. Most of the immigrants took up residence on the South Side, notably in the Burnside neighborhood. There were also Hungarian colonies in East Chicago and Joliet, and in the city around Humboldt Park. Today there is no single concentration of Hungarian settlement.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Germany-Altgeld%20%28State%20of%20Illinois%20photo%29.jpg" style="float: right; width: 300px;" title="A German immigrant to Chicago: John Peter Altgeld (State of Illinois photo)"></div><p><strong>Lithuania</strong>—As anyone who read <em>The Jungle </em>knows, many Chicago Lithuanians lived in the Back of the Yards neighborhood, while working in the Stock Yards itself. The community gradually moved southwest, while struggling to keep its ethnic identity during the years of Soviet incorporation. In the Marquette Park area, a section of 69<sup>th</sup> Street was renamed Lithuanian Plaza Court. About 80,000 people of Lithuanian background now live in Chicagoland. &nbsp;</p><p><strong>Luxembourg</strong>—People from Luxembourg were living on the North Side as early as the 1840s. Within a few decades, a major settlement became established along Ridge Avenue, near St. Henry Catholic Church. A Luxembourger community also sprang up in Niles Center (Skokie). Today about 150,000 Luxembourgers live in various parts of the city and suburbs.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Turkey-TACA.JPG" title="Turkish American Cultural Alliance--3845 N. Harlem Ave."></div><p><strong>Slovakia</strong>—Though there have been Slovaks in Chicago for over 150 years, their numbers can’t be determined with much precision, since Slovakia did not become fully independent until 1993. For much of the 20<sup>th</sup> Century, the major concentration of Slovaks was in the Back of the Yards neighborhood, with another settlement in Joliet. The more recent arrivals have gravitated to Garfield Ridge.</p><p><strong>Slovenia</strong>—Slovenia was first part of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire, and later became a founding state of Yugoslavia, so tracing Chicago’s Slovenians is not always easy. The earliest local colonies were on the Lower West Side and in Joliet. Community life centered around the Catholic parish, though there was also a large secular element. Today there is a Slovenian Cultural Center in suburban Lemont.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-US-American%20Indian%20Center.JPG" title="American Indian Center of Chicago--1630 W. Wilson Ave."></div><p><strong>Turkey</strong>—Chicago’s Turkish population has always been small and dispersed. The Turkish American Cultural Alliance, located in the Dunning neighborhood, has worked to promote art, history, and Turkish heritage.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p><strong>United States</strong>—Before the Europeans came, the largest Native group in current Chicago was the Potawatomi. The tribes were forced to cede their lands during the 1830s, though a few families remained. Since World War II there has been a significant migration from the reservations to urban areas. Today the American Indian Center serves the 40,000 people from nearly 100 tribes living in the Chicago area.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 17 May 2012 07:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/john-r-schmidt/2012-05/how-nato-peoples-helped-settle-chicago-part-3-99036 The great American exodus to...Benelux? http://www.wbez.org/ssargent/2009/03/the-great-american-exodus/7286 <p>If you're out of work and interested in moving abroad, now is the time to do it. Why? Because, according to Anne Lowrey at Foreign Policy, there are significantly better places to be unemployed than the U.S. In a <a href="http://www.foreignpolicy.com/story/cms.php?story_id=4758" target="_blank">recent article</a>, Lowrey lists the following locales as prime real estate for the jobless: Scandinavia; Benelux (a Western European union comprising Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg); Switzerland; France; Japan. These sites offer unemployment benefits for at least 10 months--and some even offer them indefinitely (Hello, Benelux!). But the best offering comes from Denmark. Part of the Scandinavia enclave, this country offers up to 90 percent of prior earnings for up to 48 months. In addition, Denmark has computer training and rƒ©sumƒ© review, and tries to place unemployed workers into temporary positions vacated by employees on educational sabbatical or on maternity or paternity leave. And even Japan, which is at the bottom of Lowrey's list, supports workers longer if their industry is deemed to be in decline. Maybe Detroit needs to take a meeting with Prime Minsiter Taro Aso.</p> Wed, 18 Mar 2009 10:10:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/ssargent/2009/03/the-great-american-exodus/7286