WBEZ | Japan http://www.wbez.org/tags/japan Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Work on parasite diseases earns Nobel Prize for medicine http://www.wbez.org/news/work-parasite-diseases-earns-nobel-prize-medicine-113173 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP_264208766266_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res445981163" previewtitle="Satoshi Omura, Youyou Tu and William C. Campbell share in the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine."><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Satoshi Omura, Youyou Tu and William C. Campbell share in the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/nobels-winners-medicine_custom-5c0e8a8c02c077dca0d1c876ac562805d17298e8-s800-c85.jpg" style="text-align: center; height: 263px; width: 610px;" title="Satoshi Omura, Youyou Tu and William C. Campbell share in the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. (Courtesy Nobel Prize Committee)" /></p><p style="text-align: justify;">The medicines they helped develop are credited with improving the lives of millions. And now three researchers working in the U.S., Japan, and China have won the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Among the winners: William C. Campbell of Drew University in Madison N.J., for his work on the roundworm parasite.</p></div><p style="text-align: justify;">Born in Ireland, Campbell shares half the prize with Satoshi Omura of Kitasato University in Japan, who has researched the same parasite. The other half of the award goes to Youyou Tu of the China Academy of Traditional Medicine in Beijing, China, for her work in developing therapies for malaria.</p><p style="text-align: justify;">Taken together, the three &quot;have transformed the treatment of parasitic diseases,&quot; according to the Nobel Prize committee. &quot;The global impact of their discoveries and the resulting benefit to mankind are immeasurable.&quot;</p><p style="text-align: justify;">All of the researchers were born in the 1930s; much of their key research was published around 1980. And their findings came after intense searches for existing natural components that might help fight diseases.</p><p style="text-align: justify;">Working in Japan, Omura isolated novel strains of Streptomyces bacteria from soil samples that not only had antibacterial components, but also had the potential to combat other harmful microorganisms.</p><p style="text-align: justify;">In the U.S., Campbell explored the effects of Omura&#39;s Streptomyces cultures and found that, as the Nobel committee says, &quot;a component from one of the cultures was remarkably efficient against parasites in domestic and farm animals.&quot;</p><p style="text-align: justify;">The active compound, called Avermectin, was further developed to become Ivermectin, which is now used around the world to protect people and animals from a range of parasites, from River Blindness to Lymphatic Filariasis (also known as Elephantiasis).</p><p style="text-align: justify;">&quot;I humbly accept this prize,&quot; Omura said when he was contacted by the Nobel committee today. Saying there are &quot;many, many researchers&quot; who are doing important work, he added, &quot;I may be very, very lucky.&quot;</p><p style="text-align: justify;">Anecdotes have long held that Omura found the life-changing soil sample while he was doing what he loved: playing golf. He clarified that a bit today, saying it had happened &quot;very close to the golf course.&quot;</p><p style="text-align: justify;">Tu revolutionized how malaria is fought by applying ancient techniques from China&#39;s traditional herbal medicine to isolate and purify a component from the plant&nbsp;Artemisia annua&nbsp;that could fight malaria in animals and people.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/IrNL27eWKOI?rel=0" width="560"></iframe></p><p style="text-align: justify;">Tu used those insights to extract the component, now known as Artemisinin, and to show that it could beat malaria. The Nobel committee says Artemisinin represented &quot;a new class of antimalarial agents that rapidly kill the Malaria parasites at an early stage of their development, which explains its unprecedented potency in the treatment of severe Malaria.&quot;</p><p style="text-align: justify;">The plant that yielded the compound,&nbsp;Artemisia annua,&nbsp;is also known as qinghao, sweet wormwood and sweet Annie. Its use in traditional Chinese medicine dates back more than 2,000 years.</p><p style="text-align: justify;">The work that led to the discovery of Artemisinin began in the late 1960s, when China launched a large-scale effort to develop an antimalarial treatment to protect North Vietnamese soldiers from the deadly disease.</p><p style="text-align: justify;">To illustrate how malaria works &mdash; and how humans have fought it &mdash; NPR&#39;s Adam Cole produced a video feature in 2012, explaining how that story ranges from the use of quinine (and the gin and tonic) to the Vietnam War.</p><p style="text-align: justify;">&mdash;<em><a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/10/05/445976576/work-on-parasite-diseases-earns-nobel-prize-for-medicine?ft=nprml&amp;f=445976576" target="_blank"> via NPR</a></em></p></p> Mon, 05 Oct 2015 10:33:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/work-parasite-diseases-earns-nobel-prize-medicine-113173 Norway's gun-free approach to policing http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-21/norways-gun-free-approach-policing-112441 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Harald%20Groven.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Harold Groven)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/215736644&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Norwegian police practices</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>The Norwegian government recently released new data about how the country&rsquo;s police use guns. The report found that in 2014 Norwegian police threatened to use their weapons 42 times but only two shots were actually fired during the entire year. Nobody was killed or wounded in either incident. Prior to the terrorist attack of 2011, Norwegian police did not even carry weapons. The majority of Norway&rsquo;s police, like forces in Britain, Ireland and Iceland, patrol unarmed and carry guns only under special circumstances. Margaret Hayford O&rsquo;Leary, a professor at St. Olaf College joins us to discuss the Norwegian police force.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Margaret Hayford O&#39;Leary is the author of &#39;The Culture and Customs of Norway&#39; and head of the Norwegian department at St. Olaf College.</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/215737089&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Japan&#39;s declining birth rate</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Japan&rsquo;s birthrate, which has been declining for decades, reached a record low last year. More than a quarter of the country&rsquo;s population is over the age of 65. The decline in births has come as many Japanese have decided to marry later or not at all. The changing demographics have all kinds of implications for Japan, everything from a shortage of workers to take care of the elderly to issues for maintaining social security and pensions. The Japanese government has attempted all sorts of policy changes to try to address the issue. Liv Coleman, a professor of government and world affairs at the University of Tampa, joins us to talk about how the country is dealing with its declining population.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Liv Coleman is a professor of government and world affairs at the University of Tampa.&nbsp;</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 21 Jul 2015 15:11:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-21/norways-gun-free-approach-policing-112441 Nigeria's president sacks and replaces military chiefs http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-20/nigerias-president-sacks-and-replaces-military-chiefs-112430 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Michael%20Fleshman%20%282%29.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Michael Fleshman)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/215574298&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Nigeria&#39;s Muhammad Buhari fires his military leadership</span></p><div><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">Last week, Nigerian president Muhammadu Buhari sacked his military chiefs. Since then, at least 20 more people have been killed in Boko haram led motorcycle attacks. The military shakeup comes ahead of a scheduled meeting with President Barack Obama this morning. We talk about Boko Haram, the military firings, and the upcoming meeting between Obama and Buhari, with Northwestern professor Richard Joseph. </span></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Richard Joseph is the John evans professor of International history and Politics at Northwestern University, and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institute.&nbsp;</em></span></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/215576330&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Japan&#39;s military evolution in the face of China&#39;s growth</span></p><div><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">After World War II, Japan vowed to never again pursue its imperial ambitions. 40 years on, japan is at cultural crossroads, and its Prime minister Shinzo Abe, is determined to normalize the country. In July of last year, Abe announced the birth of the japanese arms trade, freeing up domestic manufacturers to cash in on Japan&#39;s status as the 6th largest military spender in the world. We talk with Dr. Andrew Oros, an associate professor of political science and international studies at Washington College, about what Japan&#39;s new venture means for the region. </span></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Andrew Oros is an associate professor of political science and international studies at Washington College. &nbsp;</em></span></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 20 Jul 2015 15:04:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-20/nigerias-president-sacks-and-replaces-military-chiefs-112430 Obama to announce action on immigration http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-11-20/obama-announce-action-immigration-111137 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP771579917554.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>President Obama will lay out his plan tonight for changes to U.S. immigration policy. We&#39;ll talk with two members of IIT&#39;s Undocumented Students and Allies organization about what they hope to see happen.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-japan-s-pm-calls-for-early-elections/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-japan-s-pm-calls-for-early-elections.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-japan-s-pm-calls-for-early-elections" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Obama to announce action on immigration" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Thu, 20 Nov 2014 11:36:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-11-20/obama-announce-action-immigration-111137 Japan's state secrecy laws http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-20/japans-state-secrecy-laws-110966 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP368178921388.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A year ago, Japan tightened its laws protecting state secrets, reportedly under pressure from the U.S. We&#39;ll take a look at how the U.S. may have intervened with political scientist Andrew Oros.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-japan-s-state-secrecy-laws/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-japan-s-state-secrecy-laws.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-japan-s-state-secrecy-laws" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Japan's state secrecy laws" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 20 Oct 2014 11:34:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-20/japans-state-secrecy-laws-110966 Japan reinterprets its constitution http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-07-02/japan-reinterprets-its-constitution-110441 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP80279651360.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The Japanese government has decided to change the way it interprets Article 9 of the constitution. Before, Japan was only allowed to defend itself. Now it can also defend friends and allies under attack. We&#39;ll find out what&#39;s behind the shift in policy.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-japan-reinterprets-constitution/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-japan-reinterprets-constitution.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-japan-reinterprets-constitution" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Japan reinterprets its constitution" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Wed, 02 Jul 2014 11:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-07-02/japan-reinterprets-its-constitution-110441 India election scandal for BJP candidate Modi http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-04-14/india-election-scandal-bjp-candidate-modi-110020 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/(AP PhotoBiswaranjan Rout).jpg" alt="" /><p><p>At least 14 people were killed over the weekend in India in attempts to disrupt voting. With the violence, the election has been rocked by scandal surrounding a top candidate for prime minister. We&#39;ll get an update from India expert, Sumit Ganguly. And security expert, Steve Clemons, talks about Japan resisting the Trans-Pacific Partnership and going nuclear again. Clemons also critiques President Obama&#39;s foreign policy.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-a-scandal-shakes-up-india-s-elections/embed?border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-a-scandal-shakes-up-india-s-elections.js?border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-a-scandal-shakes-up-india-s-elections" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: A scandal shakes up India's elections" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 14 Apr 2014 10:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-04-14/india-election-scandal-bjp-candidate-modi-110020 Intervention in Syria, comfort women demand apology and a Peruvian tribe emerges http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-08-27/intervention-syria-comfort-women-demand-apology-and-peruvian-tribe <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP502228822147.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The U.S. contemplates military action in Syria. Korean &#39;comfort women&#39; ask for an official apology from the Japanese government. A Peruvian tribe makes contact with the outside world.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F107522841&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-intervention-in-syria-comfort-women-dema/embed?header=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-intervention-in-syria-comfort-women-dema.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-intervention-in-syria-comfort-women-dema" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Intervention in Syria, comfort women demand apology and a Peruvian tribe emerges" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Tue, 27 Aug 2013 11:53:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-08-27/intervention-syria-comfort-women-demand-apology-and-peruvian-tribe Facial recognition, Fukushima and the geopolitics of khat http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-08-26/facial-recognition-fukushima-and-geopolitics-khat-108521 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP219522927055.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We&#39;ll take an in-depth look at government espionage with Heidi Boghosian, author of &quot;Spying on Democracy.&quot; Questions loom at Fukushima nuclear power plant. Khat could be banned in the United Kingdom.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F107341223&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/facial-recognition-fukushima-and-the-geopolitics-o/embed?header=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/facial-recognition-fukushima-and-the-geopolitics-o.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/facial-recognition-fukushima-and-the-geopolitics-o" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Facial recognition, Fukushima and the geopolitics of khat" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 26 Aug 2013 11:46:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-08-26/facial-recognition-fukushima-and-geopolitics-khat-108521 Bo Xilai trial, Fukushima and sex education in Kenya http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-08-22/bo-xilai-trial-fukushima-and-sex-education-kenya-108491 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP700189680557_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Bo Xilai&#39;s trial begins in China. Radioactive water continues to leak at Fukushima plant. A Chicagoan is helping to expand sex education programs in Kenya.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F106703310&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/bo-xilai-trial-fukushima-and-sex-ed-in-kenya/embed?header=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/bo-xilai-trial-fukushima-and-sex-ed-in-kenya.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/bo-xilai-trial-fukushima-and-sex-ed-in-kenya" target="_blank">View the story "Bo Xilai trial, Fukushima and sex education in Kenya" on Storify</a>]</div></noscript></div></p> Thu, 22 Aug 2013 11:41:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-08-22/bo-xilai-trial-fukushima-and-sex-education-kenya-108491