WBEZ | Bureau of Labor Statistics http://www.wbez.org/tags/bureau-labor-statistics Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Obama Celebrates 'Durable Economy' as Unemployment Drops Below 5 Percent http://www.wbez.org/news/obama-celebrates-durable-economy-unemployment-drops-below-5-percent-114726 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/jobs2.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The U.S. economy added just 151,000 jobs in January while unemployment dropped slightly, to 4.9 percent, according to the latest figures from the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm">Bureau of Labor Statistics</a>.</p><p>Economists had expected to see about 190,000 new jobs.</p><p>The unemployment rate, which has held steady at 5 percent the past few months, dropped slightly to 4.9 percent. It&#39;s the first time unemployment has fallen below 5 percent since the recession.</p><div id="res465704391"><div id="responsive-embed-unemployment-20160205"><iframe frameborder="0" height="562px" marginheight="0" scrolling="no" src="http://apps.npr.org/dailygraphics/graphics/unemployment-20160205/child.html?initialWidth=556&amp;childId=responsive-embed-unemployment-20160205&amp;parentUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.npr.org%2Fsections%2Fthetwo-way%2F2016%2F02%2F05%2F465686010%2Fu-s-added-151-000-jobs-in-january-unemployment-dropped-to-4-9-percent%3Fft%3Dnprml%26f%3D465686010" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; border-style: initial; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;" width="620px"></iframe></div></div><p>President Obama celebrated that benchmark by making a statement on the economy, noting that not only had unemployment returned to its lowest level in 8 years, but that the private sector had also seen 71 straight months of private-sector job growth. The growth of the economy is also &quot;finally starting to translate into bigger paychecks,&quot; the president said.</p><p>&quot;The United States of America right now has the strongest, most durable economy in the world,&quot; Obama said. But when asked by reporters, he acknowledge that many Americans are still feeling the effects of the recession &mdash; and that the labor force participation rate, 62,7 percent, is still comparatively low, indicating many Americans aren&#39;t actively looking for work.</p><p>Obama explained his position on the economy by way of a workout analogy:</p><blockquote><div><p>&quot;We should feel good about the progress we&#39;ve made, understanding that we&#39;ve still got more work to do.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s sort of like, you know, I&#39;m 54 now so I&#39;ve got to work out harder to stay in shape. And you know, if I&#39;m feeling good in the gym I want to acknowledge that what I&#39;m doing is working. Because otherwise I&#39;ll just go off and have a big double bacon cheeseburger or something, because I&#39;ll think, well, this isn&#39;t working.</p><p>&quot;No &mdash; if it&#39;s working then we should be staying on that same path. That doesn&#39;t mean that I&#39;m where I&#39;m where I necessarily want to be, it doesn&#39;t mean that I stop doing some hard work to get where we need to go.&quot;</p></div></blockquote><p>The January jobs report also revised the more-robust job growth during the end of 2015, shifting the overall total downward: November&#39;s job gains were changed from 252,000 to 280,000, the BLS says, and in December, the economy added 262,000 new jobs, rather than 292,000.</p><p>One bright spot on the report: Wages. Average hourly earnings rose by 12 cents in January, to $25.39. The report says that over the year, wages have risen 2.5 percent overall.</p><p>Retail, restaurants, healthcare and manufacturing all gained jobs, the BLS says. But jobs were lost in transportation, warehousing, private education services and mining.</p><p>Meanwhile, NPR&#39;s Yuki Noguchi reports for our Newscast unit that other reports suggest layoff activity has increased:</p><p>&quot;The Labor Department said claims for new jobless benefits increased last week. And outplacement firm Challenger Gray and Christmas said planned layoffs spiked last month because of cutbacks in retail and energy,&quot; Yuki says. &quot;Last month, Walmart and Macy&#39;s both announced plans to pare down their workforces.&quot;</p><p>And last month, the Commerce department reported that&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-01-29/economic-growth-cools-as-american-consumers-temper-spendinghttp://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/national/gdp/gdpnewsrelease.htm">GDP growth had slowed to 0.7 percent</a>.</p><p><a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/02/05/465686010/u-s-added-151-000-jobs-in-january-unemployment-dropped-to-4-9-percent?ft=nprml&amp;f=465686010"><em>&mdash;via NPR</em></a></p></p> Fri, 05 Feb 2016 12:52:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/obama-celebrates-durable-economy-unemployment-drops-below-5-percent-114726 Immigrant job deaths up 14% in two years http://www.wbez.org/news/immigrant-job-deaths-14-two-years-107069 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/familia centeno 003a CROPfixed.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The number of job fatalities among U.S. immigrants is increasing, a WBEZ analysis of <a href="http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshcfoi1.htm">U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics</a> data has found.</p><p>Foreign-born worker deaths rose 13.9 percent from 2009 to 2011, the most recent year for which data are available. Fatal injuries of U.S.-born workers during the period edged up just 1.0 percent.</p><p>Of the 843 immigrants who died from job injuries in 2011, Mexicans accounted for 349 (41.4 percent). The second largest group was Salvadoran, a nationality that accounted for 40 (4.7 percent) of the deaths. Next on the list were Guatemalan, Honduran and Indian immigrants &mdash; all with 24 (2.8 percent).</p><p>Immigrants constituted 18.0 percent of the country&rsquo;s 4,693 workers who suffered fatal job injuries in 2011. The annual percentage had increased each year going back to 2008, when foreign-born workers accounted for 16.0 percent of job fatalities.</p><p>Muzaffar Chishti, who directs the Migration Policy Institute office at New York University, says the immigrant fatality increase could be more than a statistical anomaly.</p><p>&ldquo;As recession has taken hold, employers have tightened their belt,&rdquo; Chishti said. &ldquo;And many of the labor standards, especially related to safety, go out the window.&rdquo;</p><p>Chishti also points to factors that inhibit immigrants from defending their workplace rights. Many foreign-born workers face language barriers. And many end up working for temporary agencies or other employers that can easily replace them.</p><p>The most vulnerable immigrants lack authorization to be in the United States &mdash; making them even less likely to speak up for their rights, Chishti said, because they fear their bosses will turn them over to immigration authorities.</p><p>Immigrant temporary workers who suffered a fatal job injury in 2011 included Chicago resident Carlos Centeno, 50, a Mexican native scalded by nearly boiling acid in a Bedford Park factory. <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/98-minutes-radio-story-104504">A WBEZ and Center for Public Integrity investigation</a> of Centeno&rsquo;s case found that the federal government is not keeping close track of temp-worker injuries.</p><p>Immigrants in the country illegally are also more likely to work in dangerous industries, such as construction and meatpacking, Chishti said.</p><p>The AFL-CIO highlighted immigrant worker fatalities Tuesday in an <a href="http://www.aflcio.org/Issues/Job-Safety/Death-on-the-Job-Report">annual safety report</a>. &ldquo;Fatalities among foreign-born or immigrant workers continue to be a serious problem,&rdquo; the report said.</p><p>In Illinois, 38 immigrants died from job injuries in 2011. The state number had ranged from 23 to 42 since 2006.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/cmitchell-0">Chip Mitchell</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s West Side bureau reporter. Follow him on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/ChipMitchell1">@ChipMitchell1</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>, and connect with him through <a href="https://www.facebook.com/chipmitchell1">Facebook</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/in/ChipMitchell1">LinkedIn</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 08 May 2013 07:48:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/immigrant-job-deaths-14-two-years-107069 U.S. shed 651,000 jobs in February http://www.wbez.org/ssargent/2009/03/us-sheds-651000-jobs-in-february/7267 <p>The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday that the national unemployment rate jumped to 8.1 percent last month, its highest total in 25 years. The economy has now hemorrhaged more than 4.4 million jobs since the recession started in December 2007.</p> Fri, 06 Mar 2009 11:31:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/ssargent/2009/03/us-sheds-651000-jobs-in-february/7267 College Grads Looking for Work http://www.wbez.org/ahill/2009/03/college-grads-looking-for-work/7262 <p>Even college degrees don't guarantee a job in this economy. According to unpublished data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics -- college grads between the ages of 20 and 24 had a 7.7 percent unemployment rate in January of this year -- that's a touch higher than the national average, and significantly higher than the 4.1 percent unemployment rate of older college graduates. I recently asked a trio young people -- <a href="http://www.fmoliver.com/" target="_blank">Morgan Oliver</a>, <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/in/jeannepower" target="_blank">Jeanne Power </a>and Graham Troyer-Joy, all with college degrees -- to get together at a cafƒ© in Chicago to talk with me and each other about the economy. The story is <a href="http://www.wbez.org/Content.aspx?audioID=32533">here</a>.</p> Wed, 04 Mar 2009 10:56:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/ahill/2009/03/college-grads-looking-for-work/7262