WBEZ | Facebook http://www.wbez.org/tags/facebook Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en How to Get Dads to Take Parental Leave? Seeing Other Dads Do It http://www.wbez.org/news/how-get-dads-take-parental-leave-seeing-other-dads-do-it-114762 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/dads2.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="storytext"><p>Facebook founder <a href="https://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-11-23/zuckerberg-take-2-months-parental-leave-mayer-take-2-weeks-113897">Mark Zuckerberg may have taken an extended paternity leave</a> after the birth of his daughter, but generally, American men do not take more than a few days.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/centers/cwf/pdf/BCCWF%20The%20New%20Dad%202015.pdf">Ninety-six percent of American men</a>&nbsp;are back to work within two weeks of a baby&#39;s birth.</p><p>&quot;There might be some stigma attached,&quot; says Gordon Dahl, an economist at the University of California, San Diego. &quot; &#39;What if I take paternity leave, will I not get the next promotion? Or will people think I&#39;m not as connected to the workplace? Am I kind of signaling that I don&#39;t care about work enough?&#39; &quot;</p><p>Dahl studied leave policies in Norway, where a generation ago men took long paternity leave at the same rate as American men. Then, in 1993, Norway changed the law. After every birth, working parents still got 8 months of paid leave to split among themselves but 4 weeks were added just for dad.<br /><br />&quot;Overnight, paternity leave take up went from about 3 percent to 35 percent of fathers,&quot; Dahl says.<br /><br />It was a nice boost, mostly among men working union and government jobs.</p><div id="con465747752" previewtitle="Related links"><div id="res465747627"><div><div>&nbsp;</div></div></div></div><p>What puzzled Dahl was the change that he saw over the next two decades. &quot;This is where the story gets more interesting, because over time, it gradually crept up to about 70 percent of fathers taking leave,&quot; Dahl says.<br /><br />He found the secret was seeing a dad come back to his job, especially in the private sector, without any problems.<br /><br />&quot;If you had a coworker take leave, then you&#39;re 11 percentage points more likely to take leave yourself when you have your child. If you have a brother who took leave, you&#39;re 15 percentage points more likely to take leave,&quot; Dahl says. &quot;These are not small effects. These are big increases in how many people are willing to take leave.&quot;<br /><br />Something similar may be brewing in California,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ncsl.org/research/labor-and-employment/state-family-and-medical-leave-laws.aspx#2" target="_blank">where paid leave has been available</a>&nbsp;to working parents since 2004. Consider Facebook. A combination of factors is tipping the culture toward men actually taking their paternity leave.<br /><br />Tom Stocky, a vice president, had a daughter in 2012 and took the full four months that Facebook offers new parents. &quot;Most of my friends were really surprised and had a lot of questions about what happened when you were away, and what did the rest of your team do, and things like that,&quot; Stocky says.<br /><br />Three years later, Stocky believes the leave he took is having a big impact. The men he manages are much more likely to inquire about and take a long leave.<br /><br />&quot;I probably meet with a new dad every month or two. And it seems like there&#39;s kind of a peer group now that is encouraging and supporting each other and more people are taking it now as a result,&quot; Stocky says.<br /><br />Among them is Tom Whitnah, an engineering manager at Facebook. &quot;I saw Tom Stocky taking his leave right as I joined the Search Team, and it just was really clear that it was something that he thought was really important,&quot; Whitnah says.<br /><br />Whitnah&#39;s two kids arrived 17 months apart, and he took full leave with each one.</p><div id="res465727555"><div id="responsive-embed-paternity-leave-20160203"><iframe frameborder="0" height="801px" marginheight="0" scrolling="no" src="http://apps.npr.org/dailygraphics/graphics/paternity-leave-20160203/child.html?initialWidth=774&amp;childId=responsive-embed-paternity-leave-20160203" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; border-style: initial; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;" width="620px"></iframe></div></div><p>&quot;I had just become a new manager, and I felt like I wasn&#39;t sure how a team goes without their manager for one or for three months, and he made it really clear this is something that we accommodate. Just made me feel so much less nervous,&quot; he says.<br /><br />The number of California dads taking a break from work to spend time with a new child is beginning to pick up. Seventeen percent of men in California took leave the first year it was offered; 26 percent did five years later.</p><p>Stocky is now taking another long parental leave. He begins three months of caring full time for his son, at the same time that his boss, Mark Zuckerberg, comes back to work from paternity leave.</p><p>Does what happens at Facebook have anything to do with the rest of the country? Maybe. But if there&#39;s one thing that the folks at Facebook understand, it&#39;s the power of friends.</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://www.npr.org/2016/02/08/465726445/how-to-get-dads-to-take-parental-leave-seeing-other-dads-do-it?ft=nprml&amp;f=465726445"><em>via NPR</em></a></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 08 Feb 2016 14:35:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/how-get-dads-take-parental-leave-seeing-other-dads-do-it-114762 Facebook Safety Checks Arrive in Nigeria, But Some Ask if it's Worth Celebrating http://www.wbez.org/news/facebook-safety-checks-arrive-nigeria-some-ask-if-its-worth-celebrating-113978 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/RTR4XCSI.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><img alt="" src="http://cdn1.pri.org/sites/default/files/styles/story_main/public/story/images/RTR4XCSI.jpg?itok=_yTnTDZC" style="border: 0px; vertical-align: bottom; max-width: 100%; height: 349px; color: rgb(51, 51, 60); font-family: 'Source Sans Pro', 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, 'Nimbus Sans L', sans-serif; font-size: 18px; line-height: 27px; width: 620px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" title="Nigerians held vigils for the girls kidnapped by the extremist group Boko Haram on the one year anniversary of their abduction, April 14, 2015. (Afolabi Sotund/Reuters)" typeof="foaf:Image" /></p><div><p>Nigerians caught up in Boko Haram violence in recent weeks have been able to use Facebook to quickly alert their friends and relatives by using the &quot;safety check&quot; feature.</p></div><p>But not every Nigerian is wowed.&nbsp;</p><p>&quot;There are bombings taking place in our country every day and somebody thinks the most important thing to do at this time is to chase Facebook for a flag, or a safety check?&quot; wonders Abuja-based author Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani. &quot;I&#39;m less concerned about the insensitivities of Facebook than I am about the insensitivities of Nigerians about the things happening in our midst.&quot;&nbsp;</p><p>In the past, Facebook used safety check primarily during natural disasters.&nbsp;</p><p>But that changed on Nov.&nbsp;13, when Facebook switched on the feature after the Paris terrorist attacks. Many Parisians were quick to use the tool. But others around the world asked why safety check hadn&#39;t been activated earlier, for instance during the double suicide bombings in Beirut the day before.&nbsp;</p><p>Facebook took the criticism and activated the feature last week in Nigeria, after Boko Haram violence in the northeastern city of Yola killed at least 32 people.</p><p>Nwaubani applauds that Facebook decision as a small step forward. But she&#39;d prefer Nigerians everywhere take a bigger step, and acknowledge Boko Haram&#39;s victims, even if those victims they don&#39;t live in Nigeria&#39;s most populated cities.&nbsp;</p><p>&quot;You don&#39;t get the sense from reading in the Nigerian newspaper that there are bombings taking place in our country every day&quot; she says. &quot;No newspapers publish the names of these people who are killed.&quot;&nbsp;</p><p>Nwaubani says Nigerians could learn from the way Parisians are dealing with extremist violence in the French capital.&nbsp;</p><p>&quot;At least when ... the Paris thing happened, the president addressed the media, everybody is shocked, we see the faces of people who were killed, we get to know about their lives,&quot; she notes. &quot;But I don&#39;t know the names of people in Yola, I just hear the numbers.&quot;</p><p>Nwaubani admits the Facebook decision might be a show of respect for Nigeria. But she wonders if the social media platform will now activate its safety check with regularity.&nbsp;</p><p>&quot;Are they going to do it when there&#39;s another one tomorrow and the next day? These are the sorts of victories that some Nigerians and Africans have come to enjoy. You know, you bully the West into doing something and you consider it a victory,&quot; she says. &quot;I understand that when you live in New York and you&#39;re Nigerian, it&#39;s important for you when you go to work the next day that all your collegues know that Facebook respected your country.&quot;</p><p>Instead Nwaubani is calling on Nigeria&#39;s media to give more attention to Boko Haram violence, and its victims.&nbsp;</p><p>&quot;Tell us who these people were. Tell us what their lives were like. &nbsp;Let us know that they were human beings,&quot; she says. &quot;Something as little as that could make all the difference.&quot;</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.pri.org/stories/2015-11-27/facebook-safety-checks-arrive-nigeria-some-ask-if-its-worth-celebrating" target="_blank"><em> via PRI&#39;s The World</em></a></p></p> Fri, 27 Nov 2015 18:12:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/facebook-safety-checks-arrive-nigeria-some-ask-if-its-worth-celebrating-113978 Camerawoman who was fired for kicking migrants to sue Facebook http://www.wbez.org/news/camerawoman-who-was-fired-kicking-migrants-sue-facebook-113443 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/triping-gettyimages-487372448-82d0f8817ce530efd71629eb2c3857ef634ee0c4-s700-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res450562945" previewtitle="This video grab made on early September shows a Hungarian TV camerawoman kicking a child as she runs with other migrants from a police line during disturbances at Röszke, southern Hungary."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="This video grab made on early September shows a Hungarian TV camerawoman kicking a child as she runs with other migrants from a police line during disturbances at Röszke, southern Hungary." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/21/triping-gettyimages-487372448-82d0f8817ce530efd71629eb2c3857ef634ee0c4-s700-c85.jpg" style="height: 405px; width: 540px;" title="This video grab made on early September shows a Hungarian TV camerawoman kicking a child as she runs with other migrants from a police line during disturbances at Röszke, southern Hungary. (AFP/Getty Images)" /></div><div><div><p>The camerawoman who drew international ire after viral videos of her kicking and tripping migrants crossing into Hungary from Serbia last month, says she plans to sue Facebook and one of the refugees she kicked.</p></div></div></div><p>Petra Laszlo, formerly of Hungarian Internet-based channel N1TV, told a Russian newspaper of her plans to sue Facebook for allegedly failing to take down threatening and negative pages on the social media site, according to an online translation of the&nbsp;<a href="http://izvestia.ru/news/593528#ixzz3p8X42aZv">Izvestia</a>&nbsp;report.</p><p>One group, called the &quot;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/PetraLaszloShame">Petra Laszlo Shame Wall</a>,&quot; has more than 10,000 likes on Facebook.</p><p>The former camerawoman also said she plans to file a separate suit against Osama Abdul Mohsen, one of the Syrian refugees Laszlo tripped and caused to fall on his son.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/09/17/441169238/man-who-was-tripped-by-camerawoman-in-hungary-gets-new-start-in-spain">He has since settled in Madrid</a>&nbsp;and found a job teaching at Spain&#39;s national football coaching academy, according to the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/syrian-refugee-tripped-job_55fb304ce4b08820d9180289?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000618">Huffington Post</a>.</p><p>Laszlo is facing a criminal case from Hungarian prosecutors and two opposition parties are seeking for her to serve prison time.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/sep/10/hungarian-camera-operator-kicked-refugees-criminal-investigation"><em>The Guardian</em>&nbsp;reports</a>:</p><blockquote><div><p><em>&quot;The opposition parties Együtt-PM and the Democratic Coalition said that they would initiate charges of &#39;violence against a member of the community&#39;, which is punishable by up to five years in prison, against László.&quot;</em></p></div></blockquote><div id="res450542626"><blockquote class="twitter-video" lang="en"><p dir="ltr" lang="de">Lage in <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Roeszke?src=hash">#Roeszke</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Hungary?src=hash">#Hungary</a> weiter schlimm - Polizei überfordert - Flüchtlinge durchbrechen Polizeikette - Verletzte! <a href="http://t.co/GlMGqGwABb">pic.twitter.com/GlMGqGwABb</a></p>&mdash; Stephan Richter (@RichterSteph) <a href="https://twitter.com/RichterSteph/status/641222535586168832">September 8, 2015</a></blockquote><script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></div><div>The ordeal unfolded in early September when hundreds of migrants pushed through a police line in Serbia and dashed across an open field in attempt to find safe haven elsewhere in Europe. Journalists were there to document the event.</div><p>As the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/09/09/438826530/camerawoman-fired-for-tripping-migrant-who-fled-police">Two Way reported last month</a>, a German television journalist was there documenting the scene in Röszke when the tripping incident occurred.</p><blockquote><div><p><em>&quot;In a video that was filmed by German television journalist &mdash; Stephan Richter &mdash; the camerawoman is seen sticking her leg out to trip a man who was evading a policeman&#39;s outstretched arm. With a boy clinging to him, the man falls to the ground. He&#39;s then seen getting up, yelling.</em></p><p><em>&quot;Announcing the firing, N1TV Editor in Chief Szabolcs Kisberk said his colleague &#39;behaved unacceptably in Röszke collection point.&#39; &quot;</em></p></div></blockquote><p>She eventually did&nbsp;<a href="http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/sep/11/something-snapped-hungarian-camera-operator-apologises-kicking-refugees?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000618">apologize for her role&nbsp;</a>in the incident and said she only reacted in that way because she was scared.</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/10/21/450542545/camerawoman-who-was-fired-for-kicking-migrants-to-sue-facebook?ft=nprml&amp;f=450542545" target="_blank"><em>via NPR</em></a></p></p> Wed, 21 Oct 2015 12:46:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/camerawoman-who-was-fired-kicking-migrants-sue-facebook-113443 Facebook plans to bring internet to regugees http://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-09-29/facebook-plans-bring-internet-regugees-113109 <p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Chinese%20President%20Xi%20Jinping%20%20talks%20with%20Facebook%20Chief%20Executive%20Mark%20Zuckerberg.jpg" style="height: 439px; width: 600px;" title="Chinese President Xi Jinping, left, talks with Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg, right, during a gathering of CEOs and other executives at Microsoft’s main campus September 23, 2015 in Redmond, Washington. (Ted S. Warren/Getty Images)" /></div><div><p>Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg promised Saturday that his company will help bring Internet access to refugee camps around the world. Speaking with public and private leaders at the 70th United Nations General Assembly in New York, Zuckerberg promoted the Internet as a &ldquo;force for peace.&rdquo;</p><p>As millions have been displaced by violence in Syria and other countries, the announcement comes as welcome news to many, but not without criticism. Free Basics, formerly known as Internet.org, is the name of Facebook&rsquo;s global effort to connect those without connections, and it is the target of backlash that claims the program is less about philanthropy and more about gaining users.</p><p><em>Here &amp; Now&rsquo;s</em> Jeremy Hobson speaks with&nbsp;Kurt Wagner&nbsp;of <em>Re/code </em>about the effort and its intentions.</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/09/29/facebook-internet-refugees" target="_blank"><em>via Here &amp; Now</em></a></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 29 Sep 2015 14:50:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-09-29/facebook-plans-bring-internet-regugees-113109 Chicago girl receives threat for aiding Syrian protesters with social media http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/chicago-girl-receives-threat-aiding-syrian-protesters-social-media-112832 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps 150904 Alaa bh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>When Alaa Basatneh was six months old her parents moved from Syria to Chicago. Alaa went to school here but always paid close attention to news from the Middle East. In 2010 what became known as &ldquo;The Arab Spring&rdquo; transformed the region, and Alaa watched closely. She was only&nbsp;nineteen years old and living in the United States, but as Alaa tells her friend Zainab Khan, she&nbsp;felt she had to get involved.</p><p><em>StoryCorps&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. These excerpts, edited by WBEZ, present some of our favorites from the current visit, as well as from previous trips.</em></p></p> Thu, 03 Sep 2015 09:18:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/chicago-girl-receives-threat-aiding-syrian-protesters-social-media-112832 The digital afterlife http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2014-10-31/digital-afterlife-111035 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Beersheba_War_Cemetery.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The world has changed more in the past 10 years than in the previous 500.</p><p>It used to be that when mankind stopped wandering and settled down with a desire to own property and things, laws or wars were required to settle disputes.</p><p>Property was easy to manage, because it was mostly physical. Land, papers, livestock and personal belongings. Today our music, pictures, books, movies, financial information and medical records are digital, and managing property has become exceedingly complex.</p><p>Somewhere along the way fiduciaries were created, people whose job it was to represent the best interests of those who were either dead or incapacitated. Into their hands, the law gave access to property and things that might be stored on that property or in other places.</p><p>People began to plan their estates and create orders for their handpicked fiduciaries to carry out upon their death. In this way, property passed from one person to another in a more or less peaceful and orderly fashion.</p><p>While most people still have physical properties like homes or cars or businesses, many people have developed digital assets that are increasingly valuable.</p><p>Online banking, insurance, forms filled out for the department of motor vehicles, medical records, credit cards and almost every aspect of our lives is digitized today.</p><p>We have tens if not hundreds of passwords to access our digital lives. And we have the cloud.</p><p>Because the World Wide Web is only 25 years old, we don&rsquo;t have much of a plan for how to pass along our digital property.</p><p>One big difference is that until recently, individuals owned and controlled their physical property, because it was mostly in a physical space where people could go and collect it. In the digital age, for the most part, they still own and control their physical property, but it&rsquo;s often maintained by a third party like your photos on Facebook or your online bank records or your investment portfolio.</p><p>There are three things you need to know about your digital life if you are thinking about how to preserve it should you become incapacitated or die.</p><p><strong>The Fiduciary System</strong></p><p>The age-old fiduciary system still is strongly in place. If you draw up a will and name a fiduciary to handle your business, the courts of law will honor this.</p><p>The problem with fiduciaries is that they can often access your physical property and records without too much trouble, but they might not be able to access your digital property.</p><p>This is because each state has different laws governing digital assets, if they have laws at all, and companies like <a href="https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/utos-173.html">Yahoo</a>, <a href="https://support.google.com/mail/answer/14300?hl=en">Google</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/help/150486848354038">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://support.twitter.com/groups/33-report-a-violation/topics/122-reporting-violations/articles/87894-how-to-contact-twitter-about-a-deceased-user#">Twitter </a>and many others like banks or even government agencies have very few policies detailing how loved ones or even fiduciaries can get access to a deceased or incapacitated person&rsquo;s account. And with no overarching law to govern them, it&rsquo;s kind of like the wild west out there.</p><p>That was until the <a href="http://www.uniformlaws.org/Committee.aspx?title=Fiduciary+Access+to+Digital+Assets">Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act</a> was created last summer.</p><p>&ldquo;What the new law does is it extends the old law of fiduciary access to allow people to manage someone else&#39;s property and it extends it to digital assets which are now online,&rdquo; Ben Orzeske, legislative council for the Uniform Law Commission said.</p><p>If you put in your will how you would like your digital assets handled upon your death or incapacitation, UFADDA, as the law has come to be called, should help insure that your digital assets become accessible to your fiduciary.</p><p>This is if you live in Delaware, of course.</p><p>For now, it&rsquo;s the first and only state to have adopted UFADDA.</p><p>Because the uniform legislation was created and approved this summer and most legislative sessions in most states won&rsquo;t begin again until January of 2015, the law hasn&rsquo;t had a chance to circulate widely.</p><p>Legal experts say that the most effective way to handle your digital assets is to include them in your will, so even without UFADDA firmly in place in all 50 states, you&rsquo;re more likely to secure your digital belongings if you include information about them in a will.</p><p><strong>Digital Death Services</strong></p><p>Like digital undertakers, a new type of service is emerging as people using social media pass away. As of 2012, there were upwards of <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/07/death-facebook-dead-profiles_n_2245397.html">30 million accounts of dead people</a> on Facebook alone. And <a href="http://blogs.mcafee.com/consumer/digital-assets">a recent study estimates</a> our digital assets average about $34,000 in value, which creates the impetus for entrepreneurs to provide the kind of help that can make it easy to manage your digital estate upon your passing or incapacitation.</p><p>Companies like <a href="https://www.afternote.com/">Afternote</a>, <a href="http://www.b-emortal.com/">b-eMortal</a> and <a href="https://www.deadmansswitch.net/">Dead Man&rsquo;s Switch</a> offer users a way to do everything from distribute their digital assets to providing access by sending emails posthumously. <a href="http://www.thedigitalbeyond.com/online-services-list/">This is a pretty comprehensive list</a> of digital death services, but none of them are the complete package, and few will provide the kind of peace of mind that legally documenting your digital assets in a will could provide.</p><p><strong>Password Management</strong></p><p>The simplest solution to the problem of what happens to your digital life once you die is to just give someone you trust access to your passwords.</p><p>&ldquo;Estate planning experts say the most important thing you can do, if you don&rsquo;t have a will, is just to have a list of your accounts and your usernames and passwords in some secure place, whether that be online or offline or wherever and to let someone that you trust know about it.&rdquo; Maeve Duggan, a research analyst with Pew Research Center, said.</p><p>Password management systems can be a useful way keep your digital assets protected while at the same time creating the peace of mind in knowing that someone other than you, whom you trust, can access your information should something happen to you.</p><p>Some of the best password management systems are <a href="https://agilebits.com/onepassword">1Password</a>, <a href="https://keepersecurity.com/">Keeper</a>, <a href="http://www.roboform.com/">RoboForm</a>, <a href="https://msevensoftware.com/msecure_ios">MSecure</a>, <a href="https://www.dashlane.com/">Dashlane</a>, <a href="https://www.passwordbox.com/">PasswordBox</a> and <a href="https://lastpass.com/">LastPass</a>. There are many others with too many features to mention, but they offer a good way to control where you digital assets go if you don&rsquo;t want to provide those instructions in a will.</p><p>Whatever way you choose to preserve your digital assets for those who come after you, you might want to consider your priorities.</p><p>&ldquo;I kind of see online assets as falling into two general categories,&rdquo; Maeve Duggan said. &ldquo;The first has a really practical or financial value. Stuff like your online bank accounts, any medical records, insurance documents, loans. The second is the sentimental, nostalgic kinds of things. Photos, music, certain emails. But I will say that it depends on which you think is more important to prioritize.&rdquo;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/takimoff" rel="author">Tim Akimoff</a> is the Director of Digital Content at WBEZ. You can follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/timakimoff"> Twitter</a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/timakimoff"> Facebook. </a></em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 31 Oct 2014 11:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2014-10-31/digital-afterlife-111035 BlogHer’s annual conference comes to Chicago http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/blogher%E2%80%99s-annual-conference-comes-chicago-108168 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/blogher_ac.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The nation&rsquo;s biggest conference for female bloggers is coming to Chicago&rsquo;s McCormick Place this week.</p><p>BlogHer is an online community where female bloggers exchange life advice.</p><p>Co-founder and Chief Operating Officer Elisa Camahort Page said&nbsp; the conference brings more than just education.</p><p>&ldquo;Business gets done in these kinds of events,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;Getting out there in the world, [and] meeting other people who are interested.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;We had attendees who met like-minded people with whom they finally hit on the partners to start that business that they&rsquo;ve been thinking about,&rdquo; she added.</p><p>This is the third time BlogHer comes to Chicago.</p><p>This year&rsquo;s keynote speakers include Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg and The Walking Dead producer Gale Anne Hurd.</p><p>The conference runs from Thursday to Saturday.</p><p><em>Aimee Chen is a WBEZ business reporting intern. Follow her @AimeeYuyiChen.&nbsp;</em></p></p> Wed, 24 Jul 2013 14:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/blogher%E2%80%99s-annual-conference-comes-chicago-108168 On Reddit, bullying doesn't stop after high school http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-07/reddit-bullying-doesnt-stop-after-high-school-108137 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/pete_markham_flickr_computer.jpg" style="float: left; height: 187px; width: 280px;" title="Flickr/Pete Markham" />Although no social networking site has been spared from the epidemic of online disparagement known as <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/23/us/new-york-girl-death" target="_blank">cyberbullying</a>, Reddit has become one of the most popular outlets for such behavior&mdash;and one of the most exploitive.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">The controversial &quot;front page of the Internet&quot; has a long history of vile comments leading to ruined lives, as a recent thread <a href="http://www.buzzfeed.com/jwherrman/the-very-worst-of-reddit-according-to-reddit" target="_blank">created by the Redditors themselves</a> dug up for some much-needed introspection. Some of the worst offenses by past Redditors include identifying innocent civilians as the Boston bombers, sending death threats to rape victims, creating descipable subreddits like r/creepshots and r/jailbait (which have since been removed) and mocking a bearded Sikh woman whose secretly-snapped picture was posted in r/funny for laughs.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Fortunately, the last instance had a transformative outcome: the woman saw the <a href="http://www.cbc.ca/news/yourcommunity/2012/09/bearded-sikh-woman-teaches-reddit-a-lesson.html" target="_blank">photo</a>&nbsp;of herself online and left a comment to educate Redditors on Sikh religious tradition, thus prompting the original poster to apologize. But not all cyberbullying situations end so amicably, as the suicides of Internet-tortured teens <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suicide_of_Amanda_Todd" target="_blank">Amanda Todd</a>, <a href="http://www.abcactionnews.com/dpp/news/region_pasco/hudson/friends-say-online-bullying-led-to-16-year-old-jessica-laneys-suicide-officials-investigating" target="_blank">Jessica Laney</a>, and <a href="http://www.dailydot.com/society/rehtaeh-parsons-facebook-bullies-anonymous/" target="_blank">Rehteah Parsons</a> clearly show.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Parsons&#39; mother is lobbying for a <a href="http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2013/07/19/pol-joint-cyberbullying-report-rehtaeh-parsons.html" target="_blank">cyberbullying law</a> that will make distributing images of an &quot;intimate nature&quot; &nbsp;illegal without prior consent, so that no one else will have to suffer the Internet slut-shaming that her daughter did after pictures of her rape were posted online. Yet with bullying subreddits like r/cringepics still in existence and horribly racist/sexist/homophobic commentors popping up on practically every other site, how can we stop the cycle? And even more importantly, what can the average person do to make the Internet a better place?</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/balpreet-kaur.jpg" style="height: 427px; width: 320px; float: right; " title="This photo of Balpreet Kaur was posted on the r/funny subreddit. Kaur later wrote a comment to explain that her facial hair is a representation of her faith as a baptized Sikh. (Reddit) " /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">For those who face cyberbullying on a daily basis, whether it be ugly comments or unsolicited assault via Facebook, Tumblr or Instagram, know this: anyone who hides behind their computer to spew hate at someone else is a coward, plain and simple.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&quot;Trolls&quot; attack out of jealousy, boredom or a pathological need to justify their own insecurities by putting other people down. Ignore them, block them, report them if you have to, just don&#39;t take the bait; they&#39;re not worth it.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Yes, the Internet is far too often used for bullying and hate-mongering; but thankfully, its powers can also be used for good. In 2012, Redditors helped prevent a Maryland teen from committing suicide after she posted a <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/18/reddit-cyber-bullying-maryland-high-school-suicide_n_1357067.html" target="_blank">500-word note</a>&nbsp;on the site, and also sent her high school administrators a flood of emails to express their concern. And just a few days ago, Facebook petitions helped free a Norwegian woman<a href="http://jezebel.com/internet-helps-free-norwegian-woman-jailed-for-being-ra-861059133" target="_blank"> jailed for being raped</a> in Dubai.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Of course, countless other examples of Internet chivalry exist; but we still need more <a href="http://www.upworthy.com" target="_blank">compassion</a>&nbsp;to combat the anonymous hatred, bigotry and proliferation of rape culture that has already claimed so many lives.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Support causes that matter, promote art that is meaningful, and above all, be good to one another. As Aesop once said, &quot;No act of kindness, however small, is ever wasted.&quot;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>Leah Pickett is a pop culture writer for WBEZ and co-host of&nbsp;<a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/wbezs-changing-channels/id669715774?mt=2&amp;ign-mpt=uo%3D2" target="_blank">Changing Channels</a>, a podcast about the future of television. Follow her on&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/leahkpickett" target="_blank">Twitter</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/leahkristinepickett" target="_blank">Facebook</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://hermionehall.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">Tumblr</a>.&nbsp;</em></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></p> Tue, 23 Jul 2013 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-07/reddit-bullying-doesnt-stop-after-high-school-108137 In the age of social networking, there's no such thing as privacy http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-05/age-social-networking-theres-no-such-thing-privacy-107021 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/110207_zuckerberg_facbook_ap_328.jpg" title="File: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. (Paul Sakuma/AP)" /></p><div class="image-insert-image ">Surprise, surprise: Millenials are more willing than any other generation to share personal information online.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">According to a <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/04/21/millennials-personal-info-online/2087989/" target="_blank">new survey</a> from the University of California&#39;s Center for the Digital Future, Millenials, ages 18-34, were more likely to share their location in order to receive coupons from nearby businesses: 56 percent vs. 42 percent of those 35 and over. More than half of the Millenials surveyed also said that they would share private information with a company if they got something in return.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">This push for active participation in social media may seem harmless at first, until you look at the bigger picture and cringe at the Orwellian nature of it all.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">For example, have you ever bought a product at your favorite store, and then saw an advertisement for a similar product pop up on your Facebook sidebar just moments later? Cue the Big Brother shiver up your spine: <a href="http://adage.com/article/digital/facebook-partner-acxiom-epsilon-match-store-purchases-user-profiles/239967/" target="_blank">that&#39;s no coincidence</a>.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Everything that we post to our personal websites can be tracked, and the Internet is always watching. Whether we admit to ourselves or not, and whether we like it or not, we live in a <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2013/03/16/opinion/schneier-internet-surveillance" target="_blank">surveillance state</a> that is growing more efficient and eerily omniscient by the day.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Facebook, Google, Apple, Microsoft and Amazon rule the Web; and consequently, have delved deeper into our private lives and personal interactions than ever before. Apple tracks us on or iPhones and iPads. Google tracks us on every page that it has access to, and Facebook does the same, even following&nbsp;<a href="http://www.firstpost.com/tech/facebook-finally-admits-to-tracking-non-users-133684.html" target="_blank">non-Facebook users</a> in their pursuit of prime marketing data. One reporter used a tool called Collusion to track who was tracking him, and discovered that <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/02/im-being-followed-how-google-151-and-104-other-companies-151-are-tracking-me-on-the-web/253758/" target="_blank">105 companies tracked his Internet use</a> in one 36-hour period.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Sometimes we fight back, like when Instagram proposed <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/19/technology/facebook-responds-to-anger-over-proposed-instagram-changes.html?_r=0" target="_blank">giving advertisers free reign over all posted photos</a> and then backed down when users threatened to boycott. Sometimes the Internet giants admit their wrongdoing, like when Google apologized (after being slapped with a $7M fine, of course) for &quot;<a href="http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/mar/13/google-hit-7m-fine-scooping-email-passwords-medica/" target="_blank">data-scooping</a>&quot; personal information from zillions of unencrypted databases.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">But the truth is, these highly-sophisticated apps and websites thrive on monitering our every move, and we may be powerless to stop them. If the <a href="http://www.aclu.org/blog/technology-and-liberty-national-security/surveillance-and-security-lessons-petraeus-scandal" target="_blank">director of the CIA</a> can&#39;t maintain his privacy on the Internet, then what hope is there for the rest of us?</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p>Consider the <a href="http://blog.hostgator.com/2013/04/23/1984-in-2013-privacy-the-internet/" target="_blank">major data breaches</a> of networking sites in 2012 alone:&nbsp;</p><ul><li>LinkedIn: 6.5 million passwords stolen</li><li>Yahoo: 400,000 passwords stolen</li><li>Global Payments: 1.5 million customers&#39; credit card numbers and PINs exposed</li></ul><p>Facebook experienced yet another <a href="http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/15/facebook-admits-it-was-hacked/" target="_blank">privacy breach</a> in February, two weeks after Twitter made a <a href="http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/01/twitter-hacked-data-for-250000-users-stolen/" target="_blank">similar admission</a>. Also, users have been <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/ABC_Univision/quitting-facebook/story?id=18668978&amp;page=2#.UYdPqZUlbFJ" target="_blank">quitting Facebook in record numbers</a>&nbsp;for months now. Perhaps people are finally catching on to the &quot;privacy paradox&quot; and deciding to forgo social media altogether, although the more likely scenario is that this decline is only temporary.&nbsp;</p><p>Statistics prove that most of these Facebook users will <a href="http://mashable.com/2013/02/05/facebook-break-study/" target="_blank">likely return</a>&nbsp;(because, sadly, nearly 40 percent of Americans <a href="http://news.yahoo.com/social-media-addiction-based-fear-missing-143357943.html" target="_blank">would rather have a root canal</a>&nbsp;than give up their social networking profiles for good) so where does that leave us? We can combine forces to change the pervasive nature of the Internet, or we can look inward and start by changing ourselves.</p><p>If we really want our private lives to remain private, then we can&#39;t give up without a fight.&nbsp;</p><p><em>Leah Pickett writes about popular culture for WBEZ. She still uses&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/leahkpickett" target="_blank">Twitter</a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com" target="_blank">Facebook</a>, but has given<a href="http://www.theverge.com/2013/5/1/4279674/im-still-here-back-online-after-a-year-without-the-internet" target="_blank"> a year without Internet</a> some serious thought.&nbsp;</em></p></p> Mon, 06 May 2013 08:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-05/age-social-networking-theres-no-such-thing-privacy-107021 Picture or it didn't happen http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-04/picture-or-it-didnt-happen-106640 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP195640861850.jpg" style="float: right; height: 200px; width: 300px;" title="File: Fans at an Ellie Goulding concert use cell phones to capture the event. (AP/File)" />Art punk trio the Yeah Yeah Yeahs have been posting <a href="http://gawker.com/5994047/yeah-yeah-yeahs-post-sadly-necessary-sign-asking-fans-not-to-watch-their-show-through-a-smartphone-screen" target="_blank">this sign</a> at venues on their current tour: a polite reminder for fans to enjoy their shows without a &quot;I must take a million blurry pictures/horrible sound quality videos to prove that I was here!&quot; mentality.</p><blockquote><p>&quot;Please do not watch the show through a screen on your smart device/camera,&quot; the sign reads, &quot;PUT THAT [BLEEP] AWAY as a courtesy to the people behind you and to Nick, Karen and Brian.&quot;</p></blockquote><p>Understandably, the band has a zero tolerance policy for looking out at the audience and seeing a constellation of iPhones glowing back at them.&nbsp;</p><div class="image-insert-image ">I will be the first to admit that I&#39;ve been guilty of this behavior. I&#39;ve snapped photos during shows for St. Vincent and Ty Segall, compelled to somehow immortalize the experience of seeing my musical idols in the flesh. I&#39;ve also developed a fondness for photo-sharing other aspects of my life, like the best cocktail I&#39;ve ever tasted or a new book that I can&#39;t wait to read. And I&#39;m not alone in what appears to be a <a href="http://www.generationalinsights.com/tag/generation-y-millennials/page/2/" target="_blank">millennial-specific</a>&nbsp;compulsion to photo-document even the tiniest minutiae, as the mobile app Instagram just topped <a href="http://techcrunch.com/2013/02/26/instagram-100-million/" target="_blank">100 million</a> monthly users this year.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">My generation came of age with Facebook, then mobile photo-sharing on a mass scale. We&#39;ve become a society of instant clickers, wracked with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.generationalinsights.com/tag/generation-y-millennials/page/2/" target="_blank">extreme anxiety</a> when parted from our electronic devices and a constant <a href="http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/03/20/social-media-anxiety-sites-like-facebook-twitter-stressing-teens-out/" target="_blank">needling desire</a> to prove our worth through social media. We ask ourselves, &quot;If I don&#39;t take a picture of this event, will my friends believe that I was there?&quot; With the rise of <a href="http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/tech-addiction/" target="_blank">tech addiction</a>&nbsp;and smartphone cameras literally right at our fingertips, the answer to that question is usually <a href="http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/pics-or-it-didnt-happen" target="_blank">no</a>.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">The <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papal_conclave,_2013" target="_blank">papal conclave </a>on March 12 was a glaring example of this phenomemon. Past popes (including Pope Benedict XVI in 2005) have been greeted with a smattering of camera flashes; but when the newly-elected Pope Francis appeared on the balcony of St. Peter&#39;s Basilica, almost everyone in the crowd raised their glittering smartphones and tablets in response.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">As the world&#39;s obsession with technology grows, so does our reliance on instant gratification and the gnawing impulse to photo-capture every moment. Facebook, Twitter and now Instagram have made <a href="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013-01-31/features/ct-tribu-social-media-oversharing-20130131_1_social-media-tweet-or-post-online-boundaries" target="_blank">oversharing</a> easier than ever before, and &quot;keeping up with the Joneses&quot; through social media&nbsp;even more stressful.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">According to the <a href="http://www.generationalinsights.com/tag/generation-y-millennials/page/2/" target="_blank">Pew study</a> of millennials, 40 percent of young people surveyed feel like they &quot;can&#39;t live&quot; without their smartphones. However, our parents did just fine without them, and perhaps had even better memories of their good times as a result of being 100 percent unplugged.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Can you imagine the Beatles playing to a sea of iPhones, or a Woodstock audience glued to their Twitter feeds? Back then, concert-goers could experience music in the moment, allowing the songs to wash over them completely, and never once think about which Instagram filter they should use to prove how cool they were for being there.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">To the compulsive photo-sharers: cutting back is key. Take one quick shot if you absolutely must, then sit back and enjoy whatever experience that you&#39;re supposed to be having. Pictures may last forever, but real-life moments are gone in a flash; so try really<em> living</em> them for a change, without the superficial barrier of your camera phone getting in the way. &nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em>Leah Pickett writes about popular culture for WBEZ. Follow her on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/leahkpickett" target="_blank">@leahkpickett</a>.</em></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></p> Mon, 15 Apr 2013 08:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-04/picture-or-it-didnt-happen-106640