WBEZ | Facebook http://www.wbez.org/tags/facebook Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en The digital afterlife http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2014-10-31/digital-afterlife-111035 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Beersheba_War_Cemetery.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The world has changed more in the past 10 years than in the previous 500.</p><p>It used to be that when mankind stopped wandering and settled down with a desire to own property and things, laws or wars were required to settle disputes.</p><p>Property was easy to manage, because it was mostly physical. Land, papers, livestock and personal belongings. Today our music, pictures, books, movies, financial information and medical records are digital, and managing property has become exceedingly complex.</p><p>Somewhere along the way fiduciaries were created, people whose job it was to represent the best interests of those who were either dead or incapacitated. Into their hands, the law gave access to property and things that might be stored on that property or in other places.</p><p>People began to plan their estates and create orders for their handpicked fiduciaries to carry out upon their death. In this way, property passed from one person to another in a more or less peaceful and orderly fashion.</p><p>While most people still have physical properties like homes or cars or businesses, many people have developed digital assets that are increasingly valuable.</p><p>Online banking, insurance, forms filled out for the department of motor vehicles, medical records, credit cards and almost every aspect of our lives is digitized today.</p><p>We have tens if not hundreds of passwords to access our digital lives. And we have the cloud.</p><p>Because the World Wide Web is only 25 years old, we don&rsquo;t have much of a plan for how to pass along our digital property.</p><p>One big difference is that until recently, individuals owned and controlled their physical property, because it was mostly in a physical space where people could go and collect it. In the digital age, for the most part, they still own and control their physical property, but it&rsquo;s often maintained by a third party like your photos on Facebook or your online bank records or your investment portfolio.</p><p>There are three things you need to know about your digital life if you are thinking about how to preserve it should you become incapacitated or die.</p><p><strong>The Fiduciary System</strong></p><p>The age-old fiduciary system still is strongly in place. If you draw up a will and name a fiduciary to handle your business, the courts of law will honor this.</p><p>The problem with fiduciaries is that they can often access your physical property and records without too much trouble, but they might not be able to access your digital property.</p><p>This is because each state has different laws governing digital assets, if they have laws at all, and companies like <a href="https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/utos-173.html">Yahoo</a>, <a href="https://support.google.com/mail/answer/14300?hl=en">Google</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/help/150486848354038">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://support.twitter.com/groups/33-report-a-violation/topics/122-reporting-violations/articles/87894-how-to-contact-twitter-about-a-deceased-user#">Twitter </a>and many others like banks or even government agencies have very few policies detailing how loved ones or even fiduciaries can get access to a deceased or incapacitated person&rsquo;s account. And with no overarching law to govern them, it&rsquo;s kind of like the wild west out there.</p><p>That was until the <a href="http://www.uniformlaws.org/Committee.aspx?title=Fiduciary+Access+to+Digital+Assets">Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act</a> was created last summer.</p><p>&ldquo;What the new law does is it extends the old law of fiduciary access to allow people to manage someone else&#39;s property and it extends it to digital assets which are now online,&rdquo; Ben Orzeske, legislative council for the Uniform Law Commission said.</p><p>If you put in your will how you would like your digital assets handled upon your death or incapacitation, UFADDA, as the law has come to be called, should help insure that your digital assets become accessible to your fiduciary.</p><p>This is if you live in Delaware, of course.</p><p>For now, it&rsquo;s the first and only state to have adopted UFADDA.</p><p>Because the uniform legislation was created and approved this summer and most legislative sessions in most states won&rsquo;t begin again until January of 2015, the law hasn&rsquo;t had a chance to circulate widely.</p><p>Legal experts say that the most effective way to handle your digital assets is to include them in your will, so even without UFADDA firmly in place in all 50 states, you&rsquo;re more likely to secure your digital belongings if you include information about them in a will.</p><p><strong>Digital Death Services</strong></p><p>Like digital undertakers, a new type of service is emerging as people using social media pass away. As of 2012, there were upwards of <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/07/death-facebook-dead-profiles_n_2245397.html">30 million accounts of dead people</a> on Facebook alone. And <a href="http://blogs.mcafee.com/consumer/digital-assets">a recent study estimates</a> our digital assets average about $34,000 in value, which creates the impetus for entrepreneurs to provide the kind of help that can make it easy to manage your digital estate upon your passing or incapacitation.</p><p>Companies like <a href="https://www.afternote.com/">Afternote</a>, <a href="http://www.b-emortal.com/">b-eMortal</a> and <a href="https://www.deadmansswitch.net/">Dead Man&rsquo;s Switch</a> offer users a way to do everything from distribute their digital assets to providing access by sending emails posthumously. <a href="http://www.thedigitalbeyond.com/online-services-list/">This is a pretty comprehensive list</a> of digital death services, but none of them are the complete package, and few will provide the kind of peace of mind that legally documenting your digital assets in a will could provide.</p><p><strong>Password Management</strong></p><p>The simplest solution to the problem of what happens to your digital life once you die is to just give someone you trust access to your passwords.</p><p>&ldquo;Estate planning experts say the most important thing you can do, if you don&rsquo;t have a will, is just to have a list of your accounts and your usernames and passwords in some secure place, whether that be online or offline or wherever and to let someone that you trust know about it.&rdquo; Maeve Duggan, a research analyst with Pew Research Center, said.</p><p>Password management systems can be a useful way keep your digital assets protected while at the same time creating the peace of mind in knowing that someone other than you, whom you trust, can access your information should something happen to you.</p><p>Some of the best password management systems are <a href="https://agilebits.com/onepassword">1Password</a>, <a href="https://keepersecurity.com/">Keeper</a>, <a href="http://www.roboform.com/">RoboForm</a>, <a href="https://msevensoftware.com/msecure_ios">MSecure</a>, <a href="https://www.dashlane.com/">Dashlane</a>, <a href="https://www.passwordbox.com/">PasswordBox</a> and <a href="https://lastpass.com/">LastPass</a>. There are many others with too many features to mention, but they offer a good way to control where you digital assets go if you don&rsquo;t want to provide those instructions in a will.</p><p>Whatever way you choose to preserve your digital assets for those who come after you, you might want to consider your priorities.</p><p>&ldquo;I kind of see online assets as falling into two general categories,&rdquo; Maeve Duggan said. &ldquo;The first has a really practical or financial value. Stuff like your online bank accounts, any medical records, insurance documents, loans. The second is the sentimental, nostalgic kinds of things. Photos, music, certain emails. But I will say that it depends on which you think is more important to prioritize.&rdquo;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/takimoff" rel="author">Tim Akimoff</a> is the Director of Digital Content at WBEZ. You can follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/timakimoff"> Twitter</a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/timakimoff"> Facebook. </a></em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 31 Oct 2014 11:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2014-10-31/digital-afterlife-111035 BlogHer’s annual conference comes to Chicago http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/blogher%E2%80%99s-annual-conference-comes-chicago-108168 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/blogher_ac.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The nation&rsquo;s biggest conference for female bloggers is coming to Chicago&rsquo;s McCormick Place this week.</p><p>BlogHer is an online community where female bloggers exchange life advice.</p><p>Co-founder and Chief Operating Officer Elisa Camahort Page said&nbsp; the conference brings more than just education.</p><p>&ldquo;Business gets done in these kinds of events,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;Getting out there in the world, [and] meeting other people who are interested.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;We had attendees who met like-minded people with whom they finally hit on the partners to start that business that they&rsquo;ve been thinking about,&rdquo; she added.</p><p>This is the third time BlogHer comes to Chicago.</p><p>This year&rsquo;s keynote speakers include Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg and The Walking Dead producer Gale Anne Hurd.</p><p>The conference runs from Thursday to Saturday.</p><p><em>Aimee Chen is a WBEZ business reporting intern. Follow her @AimeeYuyiChen.&nbsp;</em></p></p> Wed, 24 Jul 2013 14:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/blogher%E2%80%99s-annual-conference-comes-chicago-108168 On Reddit, bullying doesn't stop after high school http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-07/reddit-bullying-doesnt-stop-after-high-school-108137 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/pete_markham_flickr_computer.jpg" style="float: left; height: 187px; width: 280px;" title="Flickr/Pete Markham" />Although no social networking site has been spared from the epidemic of online disparagement known as <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/23/us/new-york-girl-death" target="_blank">cyberbullying</a>, Reddit has become one of the most popular outlets for such behavior&mdash;and one of the most exploitive.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">The controversial &quot;front page of the Internet&quot; has a long history of vile comments leading to ruined lives, as a recent thread <a href="http://www.buzzfeed.com/jwherrman/the-very-worst-of-reddit-according-to-reddit" target="_blank">created by the Redditors themselves</a> dug up for some much-needed introspection. Some of the worst offenses by past Redditors include identifying innocent civilians as the Boston bombers, sending death threats to rape victims, creating descipable subreddits like r/creepshots and r/jailbait (which have since been removed) and mocking a bearded Sikh woman whose secretly-snapped picture was posted in r/funny for laughs.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Fortunately, the last instance had a transformative outcome: the woman saw the <a href="http://www.cbc.ca/news/yourcommunity/2012/09/bearded-sikh-woman-teaches-reddit-a-lesson.html" target="_blank">photo</a>&nbsp;of herself online and left a comment to educate Redditors on Sikh religious tradition, thus prompting the original poster to apologize. But not all cyberbullying situations end so amicably, as the suicides of Internet-tortured teens <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suicide_of_Amanda_Todd" target="_blank">Amanda Todd</a>, <a href="http://www.abcactionnews.com/dpp/news/region_pasco/hudson/friends-say-online-bullying-led-to-16-year-old-jessica-laneys-suicide-officials-investigating" target="_blank">Jessica Laney</a>, and <a href="http://www.dailydot.com/society/rehtaeh-parsons-facebook-bullies-anonymous/" target="_blank">Rehteah Parsons</a> clearly show.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Parsons&#39; mother is lobbying for a <a href="http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2013/07/19/pol-joint-cyberbullying-report-rehtaeh-parsons.html" target="_blank">cyberbullying law</a> that will make distributing images of an &quot;intimate nature&quot; &nbsp;illegal without prior consent, so that no one else will have to suffer the Internet slut-shaming that her daughter did after pictures of her rape were posted online. Yet with bullying subreddits like r/cringepics still in existence and horribly racist/sexist/homophobic commentors popping up on practically every other site, how can we stop the cycle? And even more importantly, what can the average person do to make the Internet a better place?</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/balpreet-kaur.jpg" style="height: 427px; width: 320px; float: right; " title="This photo of Balpreet Kaur was posted on the r/funny subreddit. Kaur later wrote a comment to explain that her facial hair is a representation of her faith as a baptized Sikh. (Reddit) " /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">For those who face cyberbullying on a daily basis, whether it be ugly comments or unsolicited assault via Facebook, Tumblr or Instagram, know this: anyone who hides behind their computer to spew hate at someone else is a coward, plain and simple.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&quot;Trolls&quot; attack out of jealousy, boredom or a pathological need to justify their own insecurities by putting other people down. Ignore them, block them, report them if you have to, just don&#39;t take the bait; they&#39;re not worth it.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Yes, the Internet is far too often used for bullying and hate-mongering; but thankfully, its powers can also be used for good. In 2012, Redditors helped prevent a Maryland teen from committing suicide after she posted a <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/18/reddit-cyber-bullying-maryland-high-school-suicide_n_1357067.html" target="_blank">500-word note</a>&nbsp;on the site, and also sent her high school administrators a flood of emails to express their concern. And just a few days ago, Facebook petitions helped free a Norwegian woman<a href="http://jezebel.com/internet-helps-free-norwegian-woman-jailed-for-being-ra-861059133" target="_blank"> jailed for being raped</a> in Dubai.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Of course, countless other examples of Internet chivalry exist; but we still need more <a href="http://www.upworthy.com" target="_blank">compassion</a>&nbsp;to combat the anonymous hatred, bigotry and proliferation of rape culture that has already claimed so many lives.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Support causes that matter, promote art that is meaningful, and above all, be good to one another. As Aesop once said, &quot;No act of kindness, however small, is ever wasted.&quot;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>Leah Pickett is a pop culture writer for WBEZ and co-host of&nbsp;<a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/wbezs-changing-channels/id669715774?mt=2&amp;ign-mpt=uo%3D2" target="_blank">Changing Channels</a>, a podcast about the future of television. Follow her on&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/leahkpickett" target="_blank">Twitter</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/leahkristinepickett" target="_blank">Facebook</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://hermionehall.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">Tumblr</a>.&nbsp;</em></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></p> Tue, 23 Jul 2013 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-07/reddit-bullying-doesnt-stop-after-high-school-108137 In the age of social networking, there's no such thing as privacy http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-05/age-social-networking-theres-no-such-thing-privacy-107021 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/110207_zuckerberg_facbook_ap_328.jpg" title="File: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. (Paul Sakuma/AP)" /></p><div class="image-insert-image ">Surprise, surprise: Millenials are more willing than any other generation to share personal information online.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">According to a <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/04/21/millennials-personal-info-online/2087989/" target="_blank">new survey</a> from the University of California&#39;s Center for the Digital Future, Millenials, ages 18-34, were more likely to share their location in order to receive coupons from nearby businesses: 56 percent vs. 42 percent of those 35 and over. More than half of the Millenials surveyed also said that they would share private information with a company if they got something in return.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">This push for active participation in social media may seem harmless at first, until you look at the bigger picture and cringe at the Orwellian nature of it all.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">For example, have you ever bought a product at your favorite store, and then saw an advertisement for a similar product pop up on your Facebook sidebar just moments later? Cue the Big Brother shiver up your spine: <a href="http://adage.com/article/digital/facebook-partner-acxiom-epsilon-match-store-purchases-user-profiles/239967/" target="_blank">that&#39;s no coincidence</a>.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Everything that we post to our personal websites can be tracked, and the Internet is always watching. Whether we admit to ourselves or not, and whether we like it or not, we live in a <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2013/03/16/opinion/schneier-internet-surveillance" target="_blank">surveillance state</a> that is growing more efficient and eerily omniscient by the day.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Facebook, Google, Apple, Microsoft and Amazon rule the Web; and consequently, have delved deeper into our private lives and personal interactions than ever before. Apple tracks us on or iPhones and iPads. Google tracks us on every page that it has access to, and Facebook does the same, even following&nbsp;<a href="http://www.firstpost.com/tech/facebook-finally-admits-to-tracking-non-users-133684.html" target="_blank">non-Facebook users</a> in their pursuit of prime marketing data. One reporter used a tool called Collusion to track who was tracking him, and discovered that <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/02/im-being-followed-how-google-151-and-104-other-companies-151-are-tracking-me-on-the-web/253758/" target="_blank">105 companies tracked his Internet use</a> in one 36-hour period.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Sometimes we fight back, like when Instagram proposed <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/19/technology/facebook-responds-to-anger-over-proposed-instagram-changes.html?_r=0" target="_blank">giving advertisers free reign over all posted photos</a> and then backed down when users threatened to boycott. Sometimes the Internet giants admit their wrongdoing, like when Google apologized (after being slapped with a $7M fine, of course) for &quot;<a href="http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/mar/13/google-hit-7m-fine-scooping-email-passwords-medica/" target="_blank">data-scooping</a>&quot; personal information from zillions of unencrypted databases.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">But the truth is, these highly-sophisticated apps and websites thrive on monitering our every move, and we may be powerless to stop them. If the <a href="http://www.aclu.org/blog/technology-and-liberty-national-security/surveillance-and-security-lessons-petraeus-scandal" target="_blank">director of the CIA</a> can&#39;t maintain his privacy on the Internet, then what hope is there for the rest of us?</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p>Consider the <a href="http://blog.hostgator.com/2013/04/23/1984-in-2013-privacy-the-internet/" target="_blank">major data breaches</a> of networking sites in 2012 alone:&nbsp;</p><ul><li>LinkedIn: 6.5 million passwords stolen</li><li>Yahoo: 400,000 passwords stolen</li><li>Global Payments: 1.5 million customers&#39; credit card numbers and PINs exposed</li></ul><p>Facebook experienced yet another <a href="http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/15/facebook-admits-it-was-hacked/" target="_blank">privacy breach</a> in February, two weeks after Twitter made a <a href="http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/01/twitter-hacked-data-for-250000-users-stolen/" target="_blank">similar admission</a>. Also, users have been <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/ABC_Univision/quitting-facebook/story?id=18668978&amp;page=2#.UYdPqZUlbFJ" target="_blank">quitting Facebook in record numbers</a>&nbsp;for months now. Perhaps people are finally catching on to the &quot;privacy paradox&quot; and deciding to forgo social media altogether, although the more likely scenario is that this decline is only temporary.&nbsp;</p><p>Statistics prove that most of these Facebook users will <a href="http://mashable.com/2013/02/05/facebook-break-study/" target="_blank">likely return</a>&nbsp;(because, sadly, nearly 40 percent of Americans <a href="http://news.yahoo.com/social-media-addiction-based-fear-missing-143357943.html" target="_blank">would rather have a root canal</a>&nbsp;than give up their social networking profiles for good) so where does that leave us? We can combine forces to change the pervasive nature of the Internet, or we can look inward and start by changing ourselves.</p><p>If we really want our private lives to remain private, then we can&#39;t give up without a fight.&nbsp;</p><p><em>Leah Pickett writes about popular culture for WBEZ. She still uses&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/leahkpickett" target="_blank">Twitter</a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com" target="_blank">Facebook</a>, but has given<a href="http://www.theverge.com/2013/5/1/4279674/im-still-here-back-online-after-a-year-without-the-internet" target="_blank"> a year without Internet</a> some serious thought.&nbsp;</em></p></p> Mon, 06 May 2013 08:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-05/age-social-networking-theres-no-such-thing-privacy-107021 Picture or it didn't happen http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-04/picture-or-it-didnt-happen-106640 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP195640861850.jpg" style="float: right; height: 200px; width: 300px;" title="File: Fans at an Ellie Goulding concert use cell phones to capture the event. (AP/File)" />Art punk trio the Yeah Yeah Yeahs have been posting <a href="http://gawker.com/5994047/yeah-yeah-yeahs-post-sadly-necessary-sign-asking-fans-not-to-watch-their-show-through-a-smartphone-screen" target="_blank">this sign</a> at venues on their current tour: a polite reminder for fans to enjoy their shows without a &quot;I must take a million blurry pictures/horrible sound quality videos to prove that I was here!&quot; mentality.</p><blockquote><p>&quot;Please do not watch the show through a screen on your smart device/camera,&quot; the sign reads, &quot;PUT THAT [BLEEP] AWAY as a courtesy to the people behind you and to Nick, Karen and Brian.&quot;</p></blockquote><p>Understandably, the band has a zero tolerance policy for looking out at the audience and seeing a constellation of iPhones glowing back at them.&nbsp;</p><div class="image-insert-image ">I will be the first to admit that I&#39;ve been guilty of this behavior. I&#39;ve snapped photos during shows for St. Vincent and Ty Segall, compelled to somehow immortalize the experience of seeing my musical idols in the flesh. I&#39;ve also developed a fondness for photo-sharing other aspects of my life, like the best cocktail I&#39;ve ever tasted or a new book that I can&#39;t wait to read. And I&#39;m not alone in what appears to be a <a href="http://www.generationalinsights.com/tag/generation-y-millennials/page/2/" target="_blank">millennial-specific</a>&nbsp;compulsion to photo-document even the tiniest minutiae, as the mobile app Instagram just topped <a href="http://techcrunch.com/2013/02/26/instagram-100-million/" target="_blank">100 million</a> monthly users this year.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">My generation came of age with Facebook, then mobile photo-sharing on a mass scale. We&#39;ve become a society of instant clickers, wracked with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.generationalinsights.com/tag/generation-y-millennials/page/2/" target="_blank">extreme anxiety</a> when parted from our electronic devices and a constant <a href="http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/03/20/social-media-anxiety-sites-like-facebook-twitter-stressing-teens-out/" target="_blank">needling desire</a> to prove our worth through social media. We ask ourselves, &quot;If I don&#39;t take a picture of this event, will my friends believe that I was there?&quot; With the rise of <a href="http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/tech-addiction/" target="_blank">tech addiction</a>&nbsp;and smartphone cameras literally right at our fingertips, the answer to that question is usually <a href="http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/pics-or-it-didnt-happen" target="_blank">no</a>.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">The <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papal_conclave,_2013" target="_blank">papal conclave </a>on March 12 was a glaring example of this phenomemon. Past popes (including Pope Benedict XVI in 2005) have been greeted with a smattering of camera flashes; but when the newly-elected Pope Francis appeared on the balcony of St. Peter&#39;s Basilica, almost everyone in the crowd raised their glittering smartphones and tablets in response.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">As the world&#39;s obsession with technology grows, so does our reliance on instant gratification and the gnawing impulse to photo-capture every moment. Facebook, Twitter and now Instagram have made <a href="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013-01-31/features/ct-tribu-social-media-oversharing-20130131_1_social-media-tweet-or-post-online-boundaries" target="_blank">oversharing</a> easier than ever before, and &quot;keeping up with the Joneses&quot; through social media&nbsp;even more stressful.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">According to the <a href="http://www.generationalinsights.com/tag/generation-y-millennials/page/2/" target="_blank">Pew study</a> of millennials, 40 percent of young people surveyed feel like they &quot;can&#39;t live&quot; without their smartphones. However, our parents did just fine without them, and perhaps had even better memories of their good times as a result of being 100 percent unplugged.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Can you imagine the Beatles playing to a sea of iPhones, or a Woodstock audience glued to their Twitter feeds? Back then, concert-goers could experience music in the moment, allowing the songs to wash over them completely, and never once think about which Instagram filter they should use to prove how cool they were for being there.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">To the compulsive photo-sharers: cutting back is key. Take one quick shot if you absolutely must, then sit back and enjoy whatever experience that you&#39;re supposed to be having. Pictures may last forever, but real-life moments are gone in a flash; so try really<em> living</em> them for a change, without the superficial barrier of your camera phone getting in the way. &nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em>Leah Pickett writes about popular culture for WBEZ. Follow her on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/leahkpickett" target="_blank">@leahkpickett</a>.</em></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></p> Mon, 15 Apr 2013 08:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-04/picture-or-it-didnt-happen-106640 Divas in the board room http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2013-03/divas-board-room-106148 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/5713143208_23aa89c808_z_0.jpg" style="height: 400px; width: 300px; float: right;" title="Sheryl Sandberg on the cover of Bloomberg Businessweek (Flickr/bizweekdesign)" />Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook, and Marissa Mayer, COO of Yahoo, are arguably the youngest and most well-known females in corporate America today. In the male-dominated world of business, where only slightly more than 4 percent of Fortune 500 companies are led by women, Sandberg and Mayer are wunderkinds who achieved early success and rose to the top at a meteoric rate.</p><p>In both financial and feminist circles they are considered rock stars, trail blazers and gurus to be studied and emulated. And this dynamic duo has not been hesitant in word or deed to proclaim and demand a new set of rules for women in the workplace.</p><p>After 13 years at Google, where she was the twentieth employee hired and the first female engineer, Marissa Mayer left Google to become CEO of Yahoo in July 2012.&nbsp; Her first two challenges were obvious ones:</p><ul><li>she needed to address the company&rsquo;s declining ad revenues and stock prices</li><li>she was seven months pregnant</li></ul><p>The pregnancy issue handled itself, and on September 30, 2013, she had a baby boy.&nbsp;</p><p>The company&#39;s financial issues remain ongoing, and Mayer returned to work just two weeks after having the baby to give them her full attention. (She has managed to balance the financial dilemma and the demand of diapers by having a nursery built next to her office.)</p><p>Since then, she has done everything in her power to right the ship.&nbsp; And her most controversial decision to date speaks directly to how she sees and wants the game to be played.&nbsp; Starting this spring, &ldquo;working at home&rdquo; has been banned.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;We need to be one Yahoo, and that starts with physically being together&rdquo;, Mayer said.&nbsp;</p><p>Although Yahoo&rsquo;s new model has generated a considerable backlash, Mayer&rsquo;s message is clear: &ldquo;do as I do&rdquo; or move on.</p><p>Sandberg, in her recently published book <em>Lean In: Women, Work, and The Will To Lead</em> offers advise about how women can advance their careers, and at the same time, admonishes women for being part of the problem of why more women are not in more leadership positions. If you want to get ahead and make it big time, says Sandberg, women need to &ldquo;lean in&rdquo;, assert themselves more, put in more time, take on more tasks, be more ambitious.</p><p>Yes, she says, it is a male dominated world. So work harder. Believe in yourself. Don&rsquo;t doubt your ability to do it all.&nbsp; Make more demands. Take on more. Sandberg argues that women have to stop looking for excuses and reasons for failure or mediocrity. Success costs, and if you don&rsquo;t pay the price, it won&rsquo;t happen.</p><p>I&rsquo;ve got a daughter who is a business person, my wife is a COO of her firm and I like to think I&rsquo;m a card carrying feminist. But to tell you the truth, Sandberg and Mayer scare me. &nbsp;Or, perhaps more accurately, they confuse me. They want women to outwork the men. They are advocating putting in the big hours, and making the big compromises, so that they too can succeed on Planet Finance. But maybe they&rsquo;ve all got it all wrong. &nbsp;Maybe it really shouldn&rsquo;t be about the big job, the big hours, the big sacrifices. Maybe it&rsquo;s the system and not the players that is all screwed up. Maybe none of us, men or women, should be eager to &ldquo;lean in&rdquo; because the world we are being asked to &ldquo;lean into&rdquo; isn&rsquo;t, in the long run, humanly worth it.</p><p>Maybe our two C-suite divas are on to something more important than success at work. Maybe their&rsquo;s is a cautionary tale. Rather than &ldquo;leaning in&rdquo;, maybe all of us should start thinking about &ldquo;leaning back&rdquo;, and start trying to find success and accomplishments in other parts of our lives beyond our jobs.</p><p><em>Al Gini is a Professor of Business Ethics and Chairman of the Management Department in the Quinlan School of Business at Loyola University Chicago.</em></p></p> Mon, 08 Apr 2013 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2013-03/divas-board-room-106148 Sheryl Sandberg tells Chicago women to 'Lean In' http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-03/sheryl-sandberg-tells-chicago-women-lean-106375 <p><p><img a="" about="" alt="" and="" as="" at="" back="" be="" but="" capabilities="" challenge="" changing="" chicago="" class="image-original_image" div="" equality="" event="" ever="" feminist="" force="" from="" gender="" hilton="" holding="" house="" href="http://ideas.time.com/2013/03/07/confidence-woman/" in="" is="" joyce="" may="" most="" of="" on="" ones="" own="" palmer="" pictured="" powerful="" press="" quo="" radical="" right="" s="" says="" she="" sheryl="" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/BGewxfoCQAAfuPz.jpg-large.jpg" status="" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" target="_blank" the="" their="" themselves="" they="" think="" thursday.="" title="‘Success and likability is positively correlated for men, negatively correlated for women,’ said Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg, right, during an event at Chicago’s Palmer House Hilton Thursday night. (Tuesday Hagiwara)" to="" true="" way="" why="" winnecke="" with="" women="" /></p><div class="image-insert-image "><p>Is <a href="http://ideas.time.com/2013/03/07/confidence-woman/" target="_blank">Sheryl Sandberg</a> the most radical feminist to ever challenge the status quo of a man&#39;s world? No, but she is a powerful force in changing the way women feel about their own capabilities as leaders.</p><p>Sandberg spoke to a sold-out crowd at Chicago&#39;s Palmer House Hilton Thursday evening, in an event sponsored by <a href="http://www.nielsen.com/us/en.html" target="_blank">Nielsen</a> and presented by <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/tribnation/chi-trib-nation-response-to-sheryl-sandberg-20130328,0,2716667.story" target="_blank">Trib Nation</a> as part of the <em>Chicago Tribune</em>&#39;s &quot;Press Pass&quot; speaker series. &nbsp;</p><p>In a conversation with <em>Tribune</em>&nbsp;vice president and associate editor Joycelyn Winnecke, Sandberg shared advice and anecdotes from her new book,&nbsp;<em>Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead</em>, which has already stirred <a href="http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2013/03/maybe-you-should-read-the-book-the-sheryl-sandberg-backlash.html" target="_blank">debate</a>&nbsp;and provoked a backlash from some of Sandberg&#39;s female critics. In her book, Sandberg argues that women may be the ones holding themselves back from true gender equality in the workplace. She says that women need to &quot;lean in&quot; and &quot;sit at the table&quot; with their male peers in order to acheive the same levels of success.</p><p>During her talk, the effervescent Facebook COO (and <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2096345/Facebook-IPO-Sheryl-Sandberg-Mark-Zuckerberg-highest-paid-employee.html">multi-millionaire</a>) elicited knowing laughter and spontaneous applause from her overwhelmingly female audience, as she delivered one quotable nugget of &quot;girl power&quot; inspiration after another. Here are a few of her most memorable soundbites:&nbsp;</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/book_0.jpg" style="float: right;" title="Sandberg's 'Lean In’ sold 140,000 copies in its first week. Now the book tops the ‘New York Times’ and Amazon.com bestseller lists. (Courtesy of Knopf)" /></p><p>- <em>On the <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/23/yahoo-working-remote_n_2750698.html" target="_blank">Marissa Mayer controversy</a> at Yahoo:</em></p><p>&quot;If a man did it, there would not be a single headline.&quot;</p><p>- <em>On the <a href="http://www.npr.org/2013/03/11/173740524/lean-in-facebooks-sheryl-sandberg-explains-whats-holding-women-back" target="_blank">self-confidence</a> of women in comparison to men&#39;s:</em></p><p>&quot;Women remember their performance lower, and men higher, in relation to their success.&quot;</p><p>- <em>On the difficulty of finding a mentor as a young woman, especially when most seasoned pros in corporate America are&nbsp;<a href="http://www.brw.com.au/p/leadership/glassdoor_most_popular_ceos_list_pNkPspX7n8YbXed0GLoLBJ" target="_blank">older men</a>:</em></p><p>&quot;Searching for a mentor has become the professional equivalent of waiting for Prince Charming.&quot;</p><p>- <em>On her desire for less restriction and <a href="http://eblingroup.com/2013/03/why-men-should-read-sheryl-sandbergs-lean-in.html" target="_blank">more equality</a> in gender roles:</em></p><p>&quot;We need to teach our girls to be leaders and our boys to be nuturers.&quot;</p><p>Sandberg also described how assertive girls are often teased for being &quot;bossy,&quot; a derogotary term that is never applied to boys when they attempt to take on similar leadership roles.&nbsp;</p><p>&quot;I wrote this book for every young girl who has ever been called &#39;bossy&#39; on the playground,&quot; said Sandberg, which made the bossy-pants <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/laura-hibbard/hermione-granger-the-hero_b_898414.html" target="_blank">Hermione Granger</a> in me exclaim, &quot;Hear, hear!&quot; &nbsp;</p><p>Audience members were encouraged to tweet with the hashtag <a href="https://twitter.com/search?q=trib%20nation&amp;src=typd" target="_blank">#TribNation</a> during the hour-long event (Sandberg is a social media maven, after all) and Twitter users responded with a flurry of feminist discussion that continued long after Sandberg left the stage around 7 p.m.&nbsp;</p><p>And while the Internet mogul still has her&nbsp;<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/nisha-chittal/sheryl-sandberg_b_2755348.html" target="_blank">critics</a>, the palpable surge of female empowerment in the room last night proves that Sandberg&#39;s message of &quot;let&#39;s change the conversation from what women <em>can&#39;t </em>do to what they <em>can</em>&quot; has earned her many loyal fans here in Chicago &ndash; this sometimes-cynical blogger included.</p><p>Watch the full event <a href="http://media.apps.chicagotribune.com/secondscreen/chicago-tribune-press-pass:-sheryl-sandberg-facebook-coo-and-author-lean-in/index.html" target="_blank">here</a>, courtesy of the <em>Chicago Tribune</em>.&nbsp;</p><p><em>Leah Pickett writes about popular culture for WBEZ. Follow her on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/leahkpickett" target="_blank">@leahkpickett</a>.&nbsp;</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 29 Mar 2013 08:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-03/sheryl-sandberg-tells-chicago-women-lean-106375 Working women: can we really have it all? http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-03/working-women-can-we-really-have-it-all-106047 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/xlarge.jpg" title="Marissa Mayer, president and CEO of Yahoo, has banned her employees from working at-home. Is her decision justified or completely unfair to working mothers? (AP) " /></p><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Good news: the U.S. unemployment rate just dropped to <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/09/business/economy/us-added-236000-jobs-in-february.html?pagewanted=all" target="_blank">7.7 percent</a>, the lowest number we&#39;ve seen in 4 years.&nbsp;Bad news: most of the highest-paid jobs in this country <a href="http://gawker.com/5967445/stalled-increase-in-female-corporate-leadership-is-troubling-experts-say?tag=marissa-mayer" target="_blank">still belong to men</a>.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">The outliers in this scenario are two incredibly successful women of the Internet age: Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer. However, these media mogals have recently been on the receiving end of some <a href="http://www.slate.com/articles/double_x/roiphe/2013/03/backlash_against_sheryl_sandberg_and_marissa_mayer_why_do_we_hate_powerful.html" target="_blank">harsh criticism</a>&nbsp;for the way that they choose to navigate through a man&#39;s world.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Women clamor for more female CEOs, but when one of our own does make it to the top, we&#39;re often the first to start tearing her down. Sandberg has been mocked by female critics as &quot;a PowerPoint Pied Piper in Prada ankle boots&quot; (nice alliteration, <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/24/opinion/sunday/dowd-pompom-girl-for-feminism.html" target="_blank">Maureen Dowd</a>) who &quot;<a href="http://techcrunch.com/2012/05/25/watch-sheryl-sandbergs-speech-to-harvard-business-school-graduates/" target="_blank">doesn&#39;t do enough</a>&quot; to empower other women. Meanwhile, Mayer has received her own fair share of <a href="http://jezebel.com/5986676/marissa-mayer-wont-let-you-work-from-home-even-if-you-really-need-to-be-there-sometimes" target="_blank">feminist backlash</a>&nbsp;by telling her employees that they can no longer work from home, then building an <a href="http://www.carbonated.tv/news/yahoo-ceo-marissa-mayer-ends-working-at-home-then-builds-nursery-at-her-office" target="_blank">office nursery</a> for her child and not extending the same courtesy to other parents on staff.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">I sympathize with the working mothers of Yahoo, especially since Mayer has the <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/marissa-mayers-fabulous-life-2012-7?op=1" target="_blank">million-dollar</a> luxury of bringing her baby to work while the rest of her lowly peons do not. Still, I believe that Mayer&#39;s decision was made with the best of intentions, even if she does come across as a bit of an elitist in doing so.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Mayer saw that her at-home employees <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/how-marissa-mayer-figured-out-work-at-home-yahoos-were-slacking-off-2013-3" target="_blank">weren&#39;t signing in</a> on a regular basis, her company started slipping and she did what she had to do to get everybody back on track. Also, paying for her kid&#39;s nursery with her own money is, in a roundabout way, setting a positive example for her staff members: &quot;I&#39;m making you come to the office, so I&#39;ll be here every morning too--with my newborn baby in tow.&quot;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">The hate for Sheryl Sandberg, on the other hand, seems even less justified. Her new book, <em>Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead</em>, encourages women to participate, or &quot;lean in&quot; to get ahead professionally. Sandberg earns a reported <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2013/03/11/living/sandberg-advice-working-mothers/index.html" target="_blank">$30 million</a> a year, so surely this is sound advice.</div><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/sheryl-sandberg-facebook-book-320x320.jpg" style="float: right; " title="Sheryl Sandberg's new book, 'Lean In,' addresses the challenges that women face in the workplace and how to overcome them. (NPR.org)" /></p><div class="image-insert-image ">Well, reviews&nbsp;from female critics have been decidedly <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/9922326/Sheryl-Sandbergs-Lean-In-reviews-round-up.html" target="_blank">mixed</a>. While some offer a smattering of faint praise (&quot;Sandberg&#39;s advice to young women, which can sound like a finger-wagging admonishment when taken out of context, is framed here in more encouraging terms,&quot; writes Anne-Marie Slaughter of the <em>New York Times</em>), most lash out with sharp-tongued vitriol.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">As Connie Schultz attests in the <em>Washington Post</em>, &quot;Sandberg barely mentions the millions of single mothers in the workplace.&nbsp;She does, however, advise women on how to find a supportive spouse--who in her book, is almost always male. Ambitious lesbians will have to find their tutorial elsewhere.&quot;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Yikes.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Okay, so maybe Sandberg isn&#39;t the next feminist icon à la Gloria Steinem or Rachel Maddow. She may not even be the best person to advise working moms on how to advance their careers, considering that her multimillion dollar salary doesn&#39;t make her all that relatable. But does she really deserve this much animosity from the women she&#39;s trying to help? I don&#39;t wholeheartedly agree with every theory that Sandberg lays out in her book, but I applaud her (and all the women featured in the PBS documentary <a href="http://www.pbs.org/makers/home/" target="_blank"><em>Makers</em></a>) for drilling holes in the glass ceiling that would not have been possible even 20 years ago.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Perhaps we should focus on building up our female leaders instead of bashing their every move, considering that we still don&#39;t have very many of them to represent us. According to <a href="http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-12-11/women-lacking-top-jobs-makes-yahoo-ceo-exception-to-rule" target="_blank">Bloomberg</a>, women only held 14.3 percent of executive positions at Fortune 500 companies and 16.6 percent of board seats in 2012, while over half of companies surveyed had all-male directors.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">These statistics are troubling for several reasons. First of all, it is a <a href="http://jezebel.com/5930815/companies-with-women-on-the-board-more-profitable-than-all+dude-corporate-sausage-parties" target="_blank">proven fact</a> that companies perform <em>much</em> better when they have more female directors. Massive corporations (with market caps of over $10 billion) that included women on their boards had stock prices that outperformed their peers by <a href="http://gawker.com/5967445/stalled-increase-in-female-corporate-leadership-is-troubling-experts-say?tag=marissa-mayer" target="_blank">26 percent</a> over 6 years, which is no small feat. Also, there has been an overall lack of progress to closing the gender gap, with the number of women in leadership positions rising at a &quot;glacial pace&quot; of only <a href="http://gawker.com/5967445/stalled-increase-in-female-corporate-leadership-is-troubling-experts-say?tag=marissa-mayer" target="_blank">1.4 percent</a> since 2011.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Ladies, we need each other. Instead of building walls out of spite, jealousy or sheer &quot;<a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/columnist/kay/2012/11/10/at-work-mean-girls/1693817/" target="_blank">mean girl</a>&quot; cattiness, let&#39;s try championing and supporting one another instead. If&nbsp;we band together and form a united front, lingering misogyny in the workplace won&#39;t stand a chance against us.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em>Follow Leah on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/leahkpickett" target="_blank">@leahkpickett</a>&nbsp;or add her on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/leahkristinepickett">Facebook</a>.</em></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></p> Wed, 13 Mar 2013 08:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-03/working-women-can-we-really-have-it-all-106047 CTA's Ventra fare scheme suffers riders' blowback http://www.wbez.org/blogs/charlie-meyerson/2013-03/ctas-ventra-fare-scheme-suffers-riders-blowback-106040 <p><p><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;"><a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/chi-critics-cta-favors-profits-over-poor-20130311,0,4375730.story" target="_blank"><img alt="Quincy Station, Brown Line to Kimball, (vincent desjardins, on Flickr)" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/CTA%20flickr.jpg" style="height: 200px; width: 300px; float: right;" title="Quincy Station, Brown Line to Kimball, (vincent desjardins, on Flickr)" /></a><b>&#39;THIS IS NO MORE THAN A DOG AND PONY SHOW.&#39;</b> That&#39;s one CTA rider&#39;s protest, as quoted in the <i>Tribune</i>, at <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/chi-critics-cta-favors-profits-over-poor-20130311,0,4375730.story" target="_blank">last night&#39;s hearing on a new fare payment system set to take effect this summer</a>, if the CTA board OKs it in a vote Wednesday.<br />-- <i>DNAinfo.com Chicago</i>: <a href="http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20130311/chicago/red-light-cameras-issuing-parking-tickets-city-asks-bidders-for-details" target="_blank">Chicago considers using red-light cams to spot parking violators.</a></span></p><p><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;"><strong>GOOD AND WET.&nbsp;</strong>Yes, Chicago&#39;s winter has become wetter than usual. Yes, that&#39;s good news for farmers. No,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.suntimes.com/18785057-761/recent-snow-rain-is-good-news-for-illinois-farmers.html" target="_blank">it&#39;s not good for people who live near rivers</a>, as the&nbsp;<em>Sun-Times</em>&nbsp;explains.</span></p><p><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;"><b>&#39;THE MEDIA&#39;S GREATEST FAILURE IN MODERN TIMES.&#39;</b>&nbsp;Newsweek&#39;s Washington bureau chief, Howard Kurtz says reports questioning the evidence or rationale for war in Iraq&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cnn.com/2013/03/11/opinion/kurtz-iraq-media-failure/index.html" target="_blank">&quot;were frequently buried, minimized or spiked.&quot;</a><br />* Conservative website&nbsp;<a href="http://www.breitbart.com/" target="_blank">Breitbart.com</a>&nbsp;falls for&nbsp;<a href="http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2013/03/11/breitbart_the_daily_currant_conservative_outlet_tricked_by_same_satirical.html" target="_blank">a parody website&#39;s report that Paul Krugman of&nbsp;<i>The New York Times</i>&nbsp;filed for bankruptcy</a>.&nbsp;<br />* Song celebrates&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wnd.com/2013/03/look-whats-happened-to-women-of-fox-news/" target="_blank">&quot;the girls on Fox News.&quot;</a></span></p><p><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;"><b>HISTORIC DECISION.</b>&nbsp;In what could be a break for Senate Democrats, Dick Durbin&#39;s decided to run for another term, which could make him <a href="http://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/03/11/in-a-break-for-senate-democrats-durbin-to-run-for-re-election-in-illinois/" target="_blank">the first Illinois Democrat to win four terms</a>.<br />* &quot;Ward Room&quot; blog: &quot;Durbin is so popular <a href="http://www.nbcchicago.com/blogs/ward-room/Durbin-History-Re-election-196949721.html#ixzz2NGQlLf9s" target="_blank">he&rsquo;ll win even if he&rsquo;s caught robbing Lincoln&rsquo;s Tomb</a>.&quot;</span></p><hr /><p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:18px;"><span style="color: rgb(165, 42, 42);"><em style="font-family: georgia, serif;">Get this blog by email, free.&nbsp;</em></span><em style="font-family: georgia, serif;"><a href="http://feedburner.google.com/fb/a/mailverify?uri=feedburner/AELk&amp;loc=en_US" target="_blank"><span style="color: rgb(165, 42, 42);">Sign up here</span></a></em><span style="color: rgb(165, 42, 42);"><em style="font-family: georgia, serif;">.</em></span></span></p><hr /><p><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;"><strong>VATICAM. </strong>Watch <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/videogallery/74761998/live/Watch-live-Cardinals-meet-to-elect-new-pope" target="_blank">live video from the Vatican</a> for a sign the new pope has been chosen.<br />* Eric Zorn: <a href="http://blogs.chicagotribune.com/news_columnists_ezorn/2013/03/who-might-be-the-next-pope-i-dont-care.html" target="_blank">&quot;Who <i>might</i> be the next Pope? I don&#39;t care!&quot;</a></span></p><p><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;"><b>&#39;MY 9-YEAR-OLD SAID: &quot;WHERE, BACK TO THE SLAMMER?&quot;&#39;</b>&nbsp;Ex-Cub Mark Grace says that, when he has to leave early to return to his work-release sentence at an Arizona jail,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/baseball/cubs/ct-spt-0312-cubs-mark-grace-chicago--20130312,0,6063500.story" target="_blank">his son gets it.</a></span></p><p><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;"><b>ARE YOU WHAT YOU LIKE?</b> A new <a href="http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/03/06/1218772110.full.pdf+html" target="_blank">report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences</a> concludes <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/breaking/la-fi-tn-on-facebook-you-are-what-you-like-says-scientific-study-20130311,0,6158934.story" target="_blank">your Facebook &quot;likes&quot; reveal a lot about your personality</a>.<br />* Simpler test on Web <a href="http://youarewhatyoulike.com/" target="_blank">diagnoses personality with a single click</a>. (Approach with caution: It found this blogger &quot;shy and reserved.&quot; Also -- snicker if you will -- &quot;well organized.&quot;)</span></p><hr /><p><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;"><em><strong>ANNOUNCEMENTS.</strong></em></span><br /><em style="font-family: georgia, serif;">* Suggestions for this blog?&nbsp;<a href="mailto:cmeyerson@wbez.org?subject=Things%20and%20stuff">Email anytime</a>.</em><br /><em style="font-family: georgia, serif;">* Follow us on Twitter:&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/wbez" target="_blank">@WBEZ</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/meyerson" target="_blank">@Meyerson</a>.<br />* Looking for the most recent WBEZ Meyerson News Quiz? <a href="http://www.wbez.org/tags/news-quiz" target="_blank">Here you go</a>.</em></p></p> Tue, 12 Mar 2013 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/charlie-meyerson/2013-03/ctas-ventra-fare-scheme-suffers-riders-blowback-106040 Is technology changing our lives too much? http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2013-03/technology-changing-our-lives-too-much-106033 <p><p>In the last 10 years, the electronic age has us totally interconnected. Social networking of all kinds &ndash; Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Flickr, Socialcam, texting, platforms such as iPads, iPhones, smartphones and computers of all kinds.</p><p>These tools have forever altered the normal concept of time and space. They have replaced it with an immediacy that has taken on a life of its own. All of us are now no more than a click away from communicating with everyone we have ever met or known in real or virtual time.</p><p>Thanks to the wild, wild word of the web, we can be anywhere and everywhere with the stroke of a key or click of a mouse.</p><p>In essence, what all of this has done is to radically change the pace and rate of our lives. Not only are we bombarded with more input, information and data than ever before, we are now required or at least strongly expected to respond to it faster than ever before. At one level, the increased pace and rate of change is a good thing. It forces us to be more agile, more responsive, more adaptable to an ever-evolving world. It opens us to more options and possibilities.</p><p>On the other hand, the increased rate and speed of input and change is exhausting. Here&rsquo;s the problem. When life becomes an Olympic endurance event (the Everydayathon), when the stopwatch is always ticking, when are we supposed to have fun?</p><p>When will there be a time to be human in the old fashioned way? As Benjamin Kline Hunnicutt, professor of leisure studies, so aptly put it, &ldquo;Having to go so fast to keep up, we miss stuff-our existence is truncated. Some things simply cannot be done going full speed: love, sex, conversation, food, family friends, nature. In the whirl, we are less capable of appreciation, enjoyment, sustained concentration, sorrow, memory.&rdquo;</p><p>I think, if we can be honest with ourselves, we all do too much or try to do too much. My mother used to accuse me of having &ldquo;eyes bigger than my stomach.&rdquo;</p><p>She told me that I both literally and figuratively put too many things on my plate.</p><p>&ldquo;Alfredó,&rdquo; she&rsquo;d say, &ldquo;you do too much. Slow down, take smaller bites, or you&rsquo;re not going to enjoy anything. Piano, piano arrive sano!&rdquo; (Slowly, slowly, and you&rsquo;ll get there surely, safely!)</p><p>You know what, maybe we should all slow down, take a moment, and reflect on the wisdom of my mother&rsquo;s words. It couldn&rsquo;t hurt.</p></p> Tue, 12 Mar 2013 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2013-03/technology-changing-our-lives-too-much-106033