WBEZ | Downton Abbey http://www.wbez.org/tags/downton-abbey Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Maid’s memoir gives glimpse at real life ‘Downton Abbey’ http://www.wbez.org/series/dynamic-range/maid%E2%80%99s-memoir-gives-glimpse-real-life-%E2%80%98downton-abbey%E2%80%99-106523 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/maids%20of%20downton%20abbey%20AP%20PBS%20Nick%20Briggs.jpg" style="height: 414px; width: 620px;" title="The maids of ‘Downton Abbey.’ The memoir of real life kitchen maid Margaret Powell served as one inspiration for the show. (AP/PBS, Carnival Film &amp; Television/Nick Briggs)" /></div><p>You may have heard of Anna and Mr. Bates, O&rsquo;Brien and Thomas, but have you heard of Margaret Powell? Her 1968 memoir about servants&rsquo; life below the stairs of a stately English house was a direct inspiration for <em>Downton Abbey</em> and its popular predecessor, <em>Upstairs, Downstairs</em>.</p><p>Powell, born Margaret Langley in 1907, grew up in Sussex extremely poor. Her father, a house painter, and her mother, a charwoman or house cleaner, could barely support Margaret and her six siblings.</p><p>&ldquo;I remember when we hadn&rsquo;t anything left to use for warmth and no money to get coal,&rdquo; she wrote in <em>Below Stairs</em>. &ldquo;I said to Mum, &lsquo;Get all the wood down. Let&rsquo;s have a fire with wood.&rsquo; She took every single shelf there was in the rooms and she even took the banisters from the stairs. Things like this make you hard.&rdquo;</p><p>Perhaps predicting her future success as a writer, Margaret won a scholarship to grammar school at age 13. But her parents couldn&rsquo;t spare her, and sent her to work in a laundry by the time she was 15.</p><p>A year later Margaret found work as a kitchen maid in a stately Regency-style mansion in the posh Adelaide Crescent section of Hove, a town on England&rsquo;s south coast. She recalled the first time she set foot in the house, which was home to a minister and his family:</p><blockquote><p>&ldquo;When my mother and I arrived at this house for the interview we went to the front door. In all the time I worked there, that was the only time I ever went in the front door. . . We were ushered into the hall and I thought it was the last word in opulence. There was a lovely carpet on the floor, and tremendously wide stairs carpeted right across, not like the tiny little bit of lino in the middle we had on our stairs. There was a great mahogany table in the hall and a mahogany hall stand, and huge mirrors with gilt frames. The whole thing breathed an aura or wealth to me. I thought they must be millionaires. I&rsquo;d never seen anything like it.&rdquo;</p></blockquote><p>Powell died in 1984, but her legacy has been preserved &ndash; and not just through her memoir or shows like <em>Downton</em>. Chicago historian and actress Leslie Goddard has developed something of a specialty inhabiting the lives of famous women of yore. In an appearance in February, she took on the role of Powell, performing an adaptation of <em>Below Stairs </em>as the author herself.</p><p>In the audio above, you can hear Goddard perform as Powell. She describes the astonishing workload typical of a pre-war kitchen maid, and explains how the stark contrast between Powell&rsquo;s impoverished upbringing and her newly lush surroundings eventually radicalized her politics.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/dynamic-range">Dynamic Range</a> showcases hidden gems unearthed from <a href="https://soundcloud.com/chicago-amplified/a-conversation-with-u-s">Chicago Amplified&rsquo;</a>s vast archive of public events and appears on weekends. Leslie Goddard performed at an event presented by Chicago Culinary Historians in February of 2013. Click <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/tea-party-below-stairs-servants-life-early-20th-century-england-106369">here</a> to hear the event in its entirety.<br /><br />Robin Amer is a producer on WBEZ&rsquo;s digital team. Follow her on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/rsamer">@rsamer</a>.&nbsp;</em></p></p> Sat, 06 Apr 2013 08:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/dynamic-range/maid%E2%80%99s-memoir-gives-glimpse-real-life-%E2%80%98downton-abbey%E2%80%99-106523 'Old talk' is the new fat talk http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-03/old-talk-new-fat-talk-105863 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/lucille%20ball%20the%20secret%20to%20staying%20young%20fb%20covers_0.jpg" title="Lucy's secret to staying young. (QuoteWave)" /></p><div class="image-insert-image ">Whenever two or more people with low self-esteem find themselves in an enclosed space, whether it be a locker room, dressing room or <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhCzRr9EwBk" target="_blank">Regina George&#39;s house after school</a>, the conversation inevitably turns to <a href="http://www.healthytippingpoint.com/ob/fat-talk" target="_blank">fat talk</a>: (&quot;I&#39;ve lost/gained x pounds,&quot; &quot;My thighs are huge,&quot; &quot;My nail beds suck!&quot;)</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">However, I&#39;ve recently noticed an even more distressing trend: <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/28/booming/old-talk-and-fat-talk-among-baby-boomers.html?_r=0" target="_blank">old talk</a>. Yep, I&#39;ve heard barely legal college freshmen asking each other in all seriousness: &quot;Do you see these forehead wrinkles? Is that a gray hair? I&#39;m getting so <em>old</em>.&quot;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">For Americans raised in a culture obsessed with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/02/09/today-show-youth-obsession_n_820868.html" target="_blank">youth and beauty</a>,&nbsp;old age is legitmately terrifying. Young people in <a href="http://www.strengthforcaring.com/manual/about-you-celebrating-cultures/cultural-traditions-and-respect-for-elders/" target="_blank">other countries</a>&nbsp;are taught to respect their elders and value the wisdom that comes with aging; but in the United States, baby boomers are largely dismissed and often reviled&nbsp;as a generation of &quot;<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/07/baby-boomers-the-national-journal_n_1946083.html" target="_blank">leeches</a>.&quot;&nbsp;We blame&nbsp;them for past wars and current financial crises, lambast them for using up our social security benefits and disregard them at every turn for being &quot;stuck in their ways&quot; and hopelessly &quot;out-of-touch.&quot;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">We also fear that one day we will become one of them: old, irrelevant, and worst of all, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/shannon-kelley/women-and-aging_b_1306661.html" target="_blank">undesirable</a>.<i>&nbsp;</i></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><img --="" about="" alt="" and="" class="image-original_image" clueless="" fifty="" i="" it="" looking="" me="" nora="" nothing:="" other="" remember="" seems="" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/hide200-bdff9f896d3efbcff1bf6cb5c87194c2f52260c1-s6-c10.jpg" style="height: 483px; width: 290px; float: right; " that="" title="&quot;Looking back, it seems to me that I was clueless until I was about fifty years old.&quot; -- Nora Ephron, &quot;I Remember Nothing: And Other Reflections.&quot; (NPR.org)" to="" until="" was="" years="" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">And why wouldn&#39;t we feel this way, when we are constantly bombared with images of high-fashion models and Disney Channel starlets who don&#39;t look a day over 18? Women spend <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/18/plastic-surgery-spending-up-2011_n_1435512.html" target="_blank">billions of dollars</a> on cosmetic surgery every year,&nbsp;because magazine covers and advertisements featuring shiny, happy teenagers will never let them forget the importance that society places on the young. Men also do their best to ward off the cultural&nbsp;<a href="http://open.salon.com/blog/andyaitch/2012/08/24/a_mans_midlife_crisis_is_caused_by_ego" target="_blank">desexualization</a>&nbsp;of old age, often forgoing adult responsibilities and turning to much younger partners in order to feel better about themselves.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">When we do see elderly people in the media, they&#39;re usually stereotyped as foul-mouthed curmudgeons, busybody neighbors or depressed individuals in need of Zymbalta, Viagra and Depends. The few exceptions to this rule (Sir Ian McKellan as <a href="http://lotr.wikia.com/wiki/Gandalf" target="_blank">Gandalf</a>, Sir Michael Gambon as <a href="http://harrypotter.wikia.com/wiki/Albus_Dumbledore" target="_blank">Dumbledore</a>, Dame Judy Dench as James Bond&#39;s&nbsp;<em><a href="http://jamesbond.wikia.com/wiki/M">M</a>&nbsp;</em>and Dame Maggie Smith as the <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVMtffzbAwk" target="_blank">Dowager Countess</a> of <em>Downton Abbey</em>) often come from a fictional or long-ago time and place, when older generations were still honored and appreciated instead of derided and ignored.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Popular media may put youthful ingenues on a pedestal for the rest of us to ogle and adore, but I still look to the Meryl Streeps, Gloria Steinems and Alice Walkers of the world: <a href="http://www.makers.com" target="_blank">living legends</a>&nbsp;whose timeless beauty emanates not just from their graceful acceptance of the aging process, but from their embrace of it as well. The<em> New Yorker</em> might write off their ilk as &quot;post-menopausal women...sexually non-threatening&quot; (really, <a href="http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/culture/2013/02/anne-hathaway-in-defense-of-the-happy-girl.html" target="_blank">Sasha Weiss</a>? ugh) but we should know better than to underestimate them.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">And to the aging men who dread each passing year, fear not. Harrison Ford and Jon Hamm didn&#39;t become famous until their&nbsp;<a href="http://getbusylivingblog.com/7-famous-people-who-found-success-starting-in-their-30s/" target="_blank">mid-30s</a>, Colonel Sanders was <a href="http://www.cracked.com/article_19655_5-famous-late-bloomers_p2.html">65</a>&nbsp;when he launched Kentucky Fried Chicken and Peter Roget invented the Thesauras <a href="http://www.cracked.com/article_19655_5-famous-late-bloomers.html" target="_blank">at age 73</a>. See? You still have plenty of time to be awesome.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">The end of your 20s might bring a job promotion, financial stability and (finally!) health insurance. Maybe you&#39;ll have more time to travel in your 30s, fall in love at 40 and make some of the best memories of your life at 70 and 80.&nbsp;If <a href="http://www.communitycollegetimes.com/Pages/Campus-Issues/Artist-is-ready-to-learn-more-at-age-92.aspx" target="_blank">this lady</a> is taking college art classes at age 92, then you have no excuse for giving up on your dreams.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;Also, why can&#39;t all TV shows be as genuinely hilarious and heart-warming as&nbsp;<em>The Golden Girls</em>? Discuss.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/VqAJIvbnkZg" width="620"></iframe></em></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em>Follow Leah on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/leahkpickett" target="_blank">@leahkpickett </a>or add her on<a href="http://www.facebook.com/leahkristinepickett" target="_blank"> </a><a href="http://www.facebook.com/leahkristinepickett">Facebook</a>.&nbsp;</em></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></p> Mon, 04 Mar 2013 08:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-03/old-talk-new-fat-talk-105863 Eat this, drink that: First Look, lion dance, and high tea http://www.wbez.org/blogs/louisa-chu/2013-02/eat-drink-first-look-lion-dance-and-high-tea-105427 <p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/louisachu/8384164935/"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/firstlooknoodles.jpg" style="width: 620px;" title="First Look for Charity 2013 preview (WBEZ/Louisa Chu)" /></a></p><p><strong>Friday, February 8</strong></p><p>As a proud Girl Scout alumna, Troop Number 232 in Chicago, I&rsquo;m pleased to announce the Girls Scouts&rsquo; inaugural <a href="http://www.girlscouts.org/program/gs_cookies/how_to_buy.asp">National Girl Scout Cookie Day</a>! Where can you buy Thin Mints, the best of all girl scout cookies, in Chicago? There&rsquo;s a Cookie Finder app for that &mdash; <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/girl-scout-cookie-finder/id593932097?mt=8">iPhone</a> and <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.gsa.gscookiefinder">Android</a>. Or kick it old school and <a href="http://www.girlscouts.org/program/gs_cookies/faq.asp">enter your zip code the Find Cookies! search box</a>.</p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/louisa-chu/2012-02-10/chicago-auto-show-food-trucks-food-drive-first-look-and-more-96276">I went last year</a> and my advice to you is get the fuzzy, pink Cadillac slippers first &mdash; dudes too &mdash; at the <a href="http://www.chicagoautoshow.com/first_look/">Chicago Auto Show&rsquo;s First Look for Charity</a>, <a href="http://www.chicagoautoshow.com/first_look/first_look_benefiting_charities.aspx">benefitting 18 local charities</a>, at McCormick Place. Then grab food and drink from David Burke&#39;s Primehouse, Union Sushi + Barbeque Bar, Real Urban Barbecue, Moët Hennessy, and much more. The event is widely considered Chicagoland&#39;s largest single-day charitable event. Attire is black-tie required. Admission $250; please note, the event does not sell out.</p><p><strong>Saturday, February 9</strong></p><p>Bang a gong and get your lion dance on at the <a href="http://www.ccamuseum.org/">Chinese-American Museum of Chicago</a>&#39;s Deconstruction of A Lion Dance at the museum in Chinatown. Learn the story behind a Lion Dance and other Chinese New Year traditions, with celebratory snacks and dumplings. Please reserve by calling 312-949-1000 or email office@ccamuseum.org. Admission $12; $8 for members, students, and seniors.</p><p><strong>Sunday, February 10</strong></p><p>Live your lovely ever so ladylike Downton Abbey daydreams at a tea party. Greater Midwest Foodways Alliance presents <a href="http://www.wbez.org/tea-party-below-stairs-servants-life-early-20th-century-england-104080">Below Stairs: A Servants Life in Early 20th Century England</a> with guest speaker Leslie Goddard in character as Margaret Powell. Admission $55 in advance, $65 at the door; please note reservations are required by calling 312-380-1665.</p></p> Fri, 08 Feb 2013 05:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/louisa-chu/2013-02/eat-drink-first-look-lion-dance-and-high-tea-105427 The perplexing popularity of Downton Abbey http://www.wbez.org/blogs/alison-cuddy/2013-02/perplexing-popularity-downton-abbey-105316 <p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center; "><br /><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/sybil31lf1.jpeg" style="height: 349px; width: 620px; " title="Downton Abbey (courtesy PBS.org)" /></div><p>First things first. If you haven&#39;t yet watched last Sunday&#39;s episode of the wildly popular &quot;Downton Abbey&quot;,&nbsp;then you need to know that this post is a bit of a spoiler.</p><p>And believe me, I have no interest in spoiling what for many Americans is their favorite television show.</p><p>Okay, that&#39;s a bit of a stretch. The <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/09/arts/television/downton-abbey-audience-swells-for-seasons-first-episode.html?_r=0">7.9 million viewers</a> who watched the January premiere of Season 3 did indeed break records for PBS, which outperformed all the major US networks except CBS. Three months earlier though, 9 million tuned in for the UK premiere - a number that was actually down from the previous year&#39;s debut.&nbsp;</p><p>Compared to the tidal wave of folks (100 million plus) who will watch &quot;Super Bowl XLVII&quot;, the PBS audiences are mere rivelets. Still, &quot;Downton Abbey&quot;&nbsp;has all the hallmarks of what, at least these days, constitutes a mass cultural event.</p><p><a href="http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/02/01/entertainment-us-amazon-downtonabbey-idUSBRE91014820130201">Amazon </a>just signed a deal to lock in digital distribution of the show. There are already endless &quot;Downton&quot; spoofs out there. Still, you know a show&#39;s really hit the cultural sweet spot when Sesame Street weighs in, with its <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPqL-1aSbn0">&quot;Upside Downton Abbey&quot;</a> parody.&nbsp; Even my local and fiercely independent bookstore has been won over, and devoted an entire shelf to books about the food, fashion and &quot;real&quot; life antecedents of Crawley-world.</p><p>So, what is it about &quot;Downton Abbey&quot; - why is it so damn popular?</p><p>For one thing, it goes down easy: This is a show that&#39;s far more feel-good than good-for-you. Despite its &quot;Masterpiece Theatre&quot; pedigree and period drama pretensions, Downton&#39;s stock characters and wild story developments are the stuff of pure melodrama. Two sisters quarreling over the deathbed of a third? Hello &quot;Downton&quot;, &quot;Dynasty&quot; and &quot;Dallas&quot; are calling and want their plots back!</p><p>Meanwhile the show tackles its history with the same list-making gusto that sites like <a href="http://www.buzzfeed.com/">BuzzFeed</a> use to parse contemporary culture. &quot;Downton&quot; doesn&#39;t so much dramatize the early twentieth century as present its &quot;10 greatest moments&quot;: Titanic sinks! Women&#39;s suffrage! Socialism! World War One! Influenza!</p><p>And the sniping over social mores around the dinner table/in the drawing room? How is that any different from the dynamics that animate &quot;Keeping up with the Kardashians&quot; or one of &quot;The Real Housewives&quot; or &quot;The Wives of&quot; shows? Turns out whether you live among aristocrats, celebrities or the spouses of plastic surgeons, everyone just wants to know one thing: &quot;Who invited <em>her</em>?!&quot;</p><p>So, &quot;Downton&quot; is a soap opera. Tastefully lit, generally well-done, but still: A soap opera. Doesn&#39;t mean the show is bad, or merely a guilty pleasure. On the contrary: it has great cultural savvy (with its &quot;Downton Abbey collection&quot; and its book clubs and its Twitter &quot;events&quot;). Still, I don&#39;t think the success of &quot;Downton&quot; is due solely to PBS&#39;s efforts to come up with a hit formula or tap into the shifting sensibilities of its audiences. Rather, I think they happened upon a set of subjects that have proven to be deeply appealing because they&#39;re so familiar. Those post-Edwardian aristocrats, with their fussy but beautiful fashions, their strict ideas about proper behavior, their master and servant edicts? Though we&#39;re separated by a good deal of time and tide, we still have plenty in common.</p><p>Take the class preoccupations that permeate the world of &quot;Downton Abbey.&quot; Americans like to think we&#39;ve created a society that&#39;s allowed us to escape the confines of class. And yet if popular culture is any indication, we&#39;re absolutely obsessed with figuring out our respective social standings, how the other half - upper or lower - lives. So we tune into &quot;Wife Swap,&quot; or &quot;Here Comes Honey Boo Boo&quot; or even &quot;The Wire.&quot;</p><p>Like &quot;Downton,&quot; those shows depict class consciousness at its most complicated, by presenting characters who, through a variety of circumstances, elude or reject or remain stifled by their station in life. And, as more Americans find themselves relegated to living &quot;downstairs,&quot; these shows, &quot;Downton&quot; included, offer a compelling way to come to terms with our anxiety - or guilt - over the consequences of our bifurcated economy. No less a cultural expert than Ru Paul said of &quot;Downton:&quot; &quot;Everybody can&#39;t live upstairs, I&#39;m sorry. We&#39;re sold the idea that we&#39;re all created equal, but actually we&#39;re not.&quot;</p><p>That we sort a lot of this stuff out in our popular amusements also inextricably links us to the world and the people of what will likely be forever more the &quot;Downton&quot; era. They too were buffeted and exhilarated by a rapidly shifting world, one transformed by new forms of communication, new powers of mobility, new technologies. And just like us, new cultural forms (sports and cinema for them, reality tv and social media for us) became ways to both express and understand the change going on around them.</p><p>That connection is made thrillingly clear thanks to James Kenyon and Sagar Mitchell, who in 1897, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Electric-Edwardians-Films-Mitchell-Kenyon/dp/B000FSME60">founded a film company.</a></p><p>These two enterprising gents would travel around England, <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0QkJNqYpFM">making films of everyday people</a> going about their ordinary business: Leaving the factory after a day&#39;s work, or watching a soccer match, or just hanging out with the family on the weekend. They&#39;d shoot during the day and then exhibit the footage that very same night, in music halls or at fairgrounds. Calling them &quot;local films for local people,&quot; they&#39;d lure in spectators (and drum up business sponsors) by billing the screenings as a chance to &quot;see yourselves as others see you.&quot; And come they did, apparently in droves.</p><p>The films were rediscovered, restored and recirculated over the past 15-odd years. And though they could be considered mere novelties or amusements of their day, watching them over a century after they were made is almost a shocking experience.</p><p>These people don&#39;t look antiquated or stiff or out of time. They look like us. And they look <em>at </em>us: Boldly, directly, flirting with the camera like the best of our reality celebrities. They&#39;re our truest ancestors, the first &quot;modern&quot; people, at least in a cultural sense.</p><p>Kenyon and Mitchell said of their lightening quick turnaround skills &quot;we take them and make them.&quot; But they tapped into something deeper about the pleasures and potential of early modern culture&#39;s capacity for immediacy and interactivity. Here was a way to get to know, or just &quot;get&quot; one another, our daily preoccupations, our reactions to the changing times. That could be a night&#39;s entertainment, or just as equally vital information, in a era when so many ways of life were being tossed aside, or desperately held onto.</p><p>Isn&#39;t that the same impulse that drives our desire to take a picture and then immediately post it to Instagram? Or to share tidbits about our commute or work-a-day world preoccupations on Facebook? Or to post our real-time reactions to &quot;Downton&quot; or the Oscars or the presidential debates on Twitter? I mean, why turn on the TV when you can just as easily &quot;watch&quot; the show by tuning into your stream?</p><p>Maybe, as a friend of mine&#39;s 5 year-old-said when introduced to Facebook, social media is just a place where we show off: Our modern day amusement hall. But maybe in our desire to share things &ndash; from the soap operas we watch to the deaths we experience &ndash; we&#39;re trying to create a meaningful experience. We don&#39;t want to just witness the spectacles around us. We want to be active participants in them.&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><br />&nbsp;</p></p> Sun, 03 Feb 2013 08:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/alison-cuddy/2013-02/perplexing-popularity-downton-abbey-105316 Give 'Bullseye' a Try! http://www.wbez.org/blog/claire-zulkey/2012-01-05/give-bullseye-try-95307 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/photo/2012-January/2012-01-05/bullseye-logo-FINAL.jpg" alt="" /><p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2012-January/2012-01-05/bullseye-logo-FINAL.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 500px;" title=""></p><p><span id="internal-source-marker_0.3906660132026467" style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Friend of Zulkey.com </span><a href="http://www.zulkey.com/2008/01/the_jesse_thorn_interview.php"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 153); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: underline; vertical-align: baseline;">Jesse Thorn</span></a><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;"> has revamped his excellent show <em>The Sound of Young America</em> for 2012, renaming it <em>Bullseye</em>. If you read this site, you probably already have a broad range of interest when it comes to pop culture, in which case this podcast is for you. The show features interviews with actors, directors, comics and musicians, recommendations from critics and guest-spots from artists where they talk about their favorite projects from their colleagues. It’s earnest but not snobbish, and more than once has turned me on to a show or artist with whom I hadn’t been familiar. The debut episode features interviews with members of the cast of </span><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: italic; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Downton Abbey</span><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;"> and the creator/star of the shows </span><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: italic; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Angry Boys </span><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">and </span><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: italic; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Summer Heights High</span><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">, amongst a few other fun features. I hope you </span><a href="http://www.maximumfun.org/2012/01/03/bullseye-outshot-week-january-3rd-2012"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 153); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: underline; vertical-align: baseline;">check it out</span></a><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;"> and consider subscribing. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span><br> <br> <span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">On a completely unrelated note, yours truly was quoted in the </span><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: italic; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">New York Times</span><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;"> yesterday in a fun story about how </span><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/05/garden/furniture-the-big-get-bigger.html?pagewanted=all%3Fsrc%3Dtp&amp;smid=fb-share"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 153); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: underline; vertical-align: baseline;">furniture is so huge these days</span></a><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;"> thanks to this silly piece I wrote last summer called “</span><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/claire-zulkey/2011-07-14/people-who-live-restoration-hardware-89145"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 153); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: underline; vertical-align: baseline;">The People Who Live at Restoration Hardware</span></a><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">.” This once again proves my point that if you get on mailing lists, receive catalogues and make fun of them on a public radio blog, you too can get your name in the Gray Lady. </span></p></p> Thu, 05 Jan 2012 14:57:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blog/claire-zulkey/2012-01-05/give-bullseye-try-95307