WBEZ | Gage Gallery at Roosevelt University http://www.wbez.org/content/gage-gallery-roosevelt-university Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Wrongful Convictions: Jonathan Jay Koehler http://www.wbez.org/event/2011-10-12/wrongful-convictions-jonathan-jay-koehler <p><p>The Joseph Loundy Human Rights Project presents "Wrongful Convictions," a speaker series where distinguished scholars and wrongfully convicted individuals come together to speak about miscarriages of justice, wrongful convictions, and where the system fails.</p><p>This event features <strong>Jonathan Jay Koehler</strong>, who is Beatrice Kuhn Professor of Law at Northwestern University. Dr. Koehler's areas of interest include behavioral decision theory, quantitative reasoning in the courtroom, and forensic science. His work shows how cognitive bias and statistical error lead to mistakes in the criminal justice system.</p></p> Wed, 31 Aug 2011 17:07:23 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/event/2011-10-12/wrongful-convictions-jonathan-jay-koehler Wrongful Convictions: Delbert Tibbs http://www.wbez.org/event/2011-10-05/wrongful-convictions-delbert-tibbs <p><p>The Joseph Loundy Human Rights Project presents "Wrongful Convictions," a speaker series where distinguished scholars and wrongfully convicted individuals come together to speak about miscarriages of justice, wrongful convictions, and where the system fails.</p><p>This event features <strong>Delbert Tibbs</strong>, who was convicted in 1974 and sentenced to death for murder and life in jail for rape. Despite his solid alibi, Mr. Tibbs was convicted—based largely on eyewitness testimony and jailhouse informant testimony. In 1982 the State of Florida dismissed all charges against Mr. Tibbs after finding that the evidence was tainted.</p></p> Wed, 31 Aug 2011 17:02:53 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/event/2011-10-05/wrongful-convictions-delbert-tibbs Wrongful Convictions: Steven Drizin http://www.wbez.org/event/2011-09-21/wrongful-convictions-steven-drizin <p><p>The Joseph Loundy Human Rights Project presents "Wrongful Convictions," a speaker series where distinguished scholars and wrongfully convicted individuals come together to speak about miscarriages of justice, wrongful convictions, and where the system fails.</p><p>This event features <strong>Steven Drizin</strong>, Clinical Professor of Law and Associate Director, Bluhm Legal Clinic, at Northwestern University. He is also the Legal Director at the Center on Wrongful Convictions, Northwestern University and cofounder of the Center on Wrongful Convictions of Youth, Northwestern University. Mr. Drizin's research interests involve the study of false confessions and juvenile justice. His policy work focuses on supporting efforts to require law enforcement agencies to electronically record custodial interrogations.</p></p> Wed, 31 Aug 2011 16:57:30 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/event/2011-09-21/wrongful-convictions-steven-drizin Wrongful Convictions: Rob Warden and Randy Steidl http://www.wbez.org/event/2011-09-14/wrongful-convictions-rob-warden-and-randy-steidl <p><p>The Joseph Loundy Human Rights Project presents "Wrongful Convictions," a speaker series where distinguished scholars and wrongfully convicted individuals come together to speak about miscarriages of justice, wrongful convictions, and where the system fails. This week we bring together Rob Warden and Randy Steidl.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Rob Warden</strong> is the director of the Center on Wrongful Convictions, Northwestern University, and award-winning legal affairs journalist. As editor and publisher of <em>Chicago Lawyer</em> in the 1980s, Mr. Warden exposed more than a score of wrongful convictions in Illinois, including cases in which six innocent men had been sentenced to death.<br> <br> <strong>Randy Steidl</strong> was released from the Illinois Correctional Center at Danville, May 28, 2004. He is the 18th person to be exonerated and released after having been sentenced to death in Illinois in 1977.</p></p> Wed, 31 Aug 2011 16:51:28 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/event/2011-09-14/wrongful-convictions-rob-warden-and-randy-steidl Milton Rogovin: The Making of a Documentary Photographer http://www.wbez.org/event/2011-04-20/milton-rogovin-making-documentary-photographer <p><p>Milton Rogovin (1909-2011) is acclaimed as a preeminent twentieth-century social documentary photographer. Born in New York and educated as an optometrist, he witnessed widespread deprivations during the Depression and dedicated himself to working for social and economic justice. In 1957 he was called before HUAC, and after refusing to testify was dubbed "Buffalo's Number One Communist." When the majority of his optometry clientele vanished he turned to photography as a way to speak about social inequities, producing his first photographic series in Buffalo's African-American storefront churches. Accompanied by his wife Anne, he went on to photograph miners in Appalachia, steelworkers in Buffalo, working and poor people of Buffalo's Lower West Side, and miners in Scotland, Cuba, Zimbabwe, Mexico, France, Czechoslovakia, Spain, Germany, and China. Rogovin's photographs demonstrate his awareness of how people's circumstances and environs have an impact on their lives and his abiding respect for the dignity and humanity of his subjects.</p><p>Event speaker <strong>Melanie Herzog</strong> is a biographer of photographer Milton Rogovin. She is Professor of Art History at Edgewood College in Madison, Wisconsin. She is the author of <em>Milton Rogovin: The Making of a Social Documentary Photographer</em>, published by the Center for Creative Photography and University of Washington Press in August 2005, and <em>Elizabeth Catlett: An American Artist in Mexico</em>, published by University of Washington Press in 2000. This event will take place in the Gage Gallery, which is now presenting an original curation of Rogovin's work.</p></p> Fri, 15 Apr 2011 13:13:52 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/event/2011-04-20/milton-rogovin-making-documentary-photographer The Working Class Eye of Milton Rogovin: Photo Exhibit Opening http://www.wbez.org/event/2011-01-20/working-class-eye-milton-rogovin-photo-exhibit-opening <p><p>The show is a one-of-a-kind, vintage photo exhibit that tells compelling stories about work and working-class people through the eyes of renowned photographer Milton Rogovin. The debut exhibit, The Working-Class Eye of Milton Rogovin, features some striking images of workers from the living photographer&rsquo;s collection that have never been seen before by the public. An opening night reception and presentation by the photographer&rsquo;s son, Mark Rogovin of River Forest, will be held at 5 p.m. on&nbsp;Thursday, January 20 at the Gage Gallery.</p></p> Fri, 14 Jan 2011 12:04:49 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/event/2011-01-20/working-class-eye-milton-rogovin-photo-exhibit-opening Getting Organized! New Strategies for Tough Times http://www.wbez.org/event/2010-12-10/getting-organized-new-strategies-tough-times <p><p>With legal reforms for an improved organizing climate at a standstill, workers, activists, unions, and lawyers are turning to new strategies to build worker power within existing workplace labor laws. Creative and pioneering strategies crafted at Workers Centers have resulted in new ways for workers to demand their legal protections, often winning large back-pay awards. Advocates argue that in the long run, direct experience with the power of collective action develops savvy workplace leaders and lays the groundwork for a new wave of unionization.</p><p>Come hear organizers explain these new approaches and assess their potential. Our panal includes: <strong>Kim Bobo</strong>, Executive Director of Interfaith Workers Justice and author of <em>Wage Theft in America: Why Millions of Working Americans Are Not Getting Paid &ndash; And What We Can Do About It</em>; <strong>Jose Oliva</strong>, National Policy Director of Restaurant Opportunities Center (ROC); and&nbsp;<strong>Dr. Robert Bruno</strong>, Director, Labor Education, University of Illinois.</p><p>The mission of the <a href="http://www.ler.illinois.edu/labor/centerforworkingclassstudies.html ">Chicago Center for Working-Class Studies </a>(CCWCS) is to bring together individuals from multiple institutions to promote economic justice and to address class relationships. CCWCS is guided by our commitment to strengthen the political, economic, and moral power of working women and men, and to expand understanding of how other identities intersect with class, including race, gender and sexuality. For more information, email Jack Metzgar at <a href="mailto:jmetzgar@roosevelt.edu">jmetzgar@roosevelt.edu</a>.</p></p> Fri, 03 Dec 2010 12:56:26 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/event/2010-12-10/getting-organized-new-strategies-tough-times