WBEZ | poetry http://www.wbez.org/tags/poetry Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Morning Shift: Maine East War Bonds and Townships http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-03-06/morning-shift-maine-east-war-bonds-and-townships-111664 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jamie%20McCaffrey.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="Flickr/Jamie McCaffrey" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/194557103&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">CPS launches Latino Studies program</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">December of 2013, Chicago Public Schools unveiled a curriculum guide on African-American studies that allowed teachers to incorporate African-American studies into core subjects all year round. Now, CPS is targeting its largest group of minority students- Latinos. Chicago Board of Education Vice President Jesse Ruiz joins Morning Shift to talk about the new Interdisciplinary Latino and Latin American Studies curriculum.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/JesseRuizEsq">Jesse Ruiz</a> is the Vice President of the Chicago Board of Education.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/194556666&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Smart Bar Chicago launches New Women in Music Series</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The music festival season is not too far off and according to one Chicago venue talent buyer, when you look at the line-ups of festivals, women comprise about 10 percent of the talent. So Smart Bar Chicago talent buyer and DJ Marea Samper (aka The Black Madonna) has decided to hold a mini festival during Women&rsquo;s History Month showcasing established and up and coming female electronica and DJ talent from around the globe. Stamper tells us about the idea behind the DAPHNE: A Women&#39;s Movement in Dance Music Festival.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="http://www.last.fm/music/The+Black+Madonna">DJ Marea Samper</a> is the talent buyer for Smart Bar Chicago.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/194556660&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Maine East/South students craft documentary</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Ever heard the expression &quot;Faster, higher, that&#39;s Maine&#39;s Flyer?&quot; We hadn&#39;t - until a group of 20 students at Maine South and Maine East High Schools produced a documentary of the same name. The doc commemorates a World War II plane funded by a student-led war bond sales effort and named in honor of what were then Maine Township High School students. We talk with Maine East student Rachel Stan, and supervising teacher Phillip Ash about the film.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="http://east.maine207.org/pash/?DepartmentId=-1">Phillip Ash</a> is a teacher at Maine East High School.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>Rachel Stan is a student at <a href="https://twitter.com/maine_east">Maine East High School.</a>&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/194556656&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">A look at Illinois townships&nbsp;</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">While High School District 207 is an entirely separate governmental entity from Maine Township, it got us thinking about the history behind townships in Illinois. How do they operate and how have they evolved? Maine Township is the largest in Cook County and oldest unit of local government in the area. Joining us from the Township&#39;s Park Ridge office is Supervisor Carol Teschky.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="http://www.mainetownship.com/government/electedofficials.shtml">Carol Teschky</a>&nbsp;is the Maine Township Supervisor.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/194556649&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">New book of poetry and photography provides hope for the recently incarcerated</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Coming out of prison can often be more difficult than going in. Even though they&rsquo;ve paid their debt to society, they&rsquo;re faced with the stigma of being ex-cons, and often lack the needed resources-in society and in themselves-to move on and rebuild their lives. For years, Brandon Crockett has taught poetry to folks living at St. Leonard&rsquo;s, a facility dedicated to moving people from prison to a positive, productive life on the outside. Now Crockett has teamed up with world-famous photographer Sandro Miller to produce a book of poetry and portraits by and of the people in his class. Brandon and members of his class join Morning Shift to talk about the experience.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em>Brandon Crockett teaches poetry at <a href="https://twitter.com/StLeonardsMinis">St. Leonard&#39;s Ministires</a></em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>Jesse Anderson and Marketta Sims are in the poetry program at St. Leonard&#39;s Ministires and contributors of the book <a href="https://twitter.com/findfreedombook">&quot;Finding Freedom.&quot;</a></em></p></p> Fri, 06 Mar 2015 07:55:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-03-06/morning-shift-maine-east-war-bonds-and-townships-111664 Louder Than a Bomb 2014 Highlights http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/louder-bomb-2014-highlights-110162 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/ltab.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>Check out poems from the finalists of Louder Than A Bomb 2014 (LTAB), the largest youth poetry festival in the world. LTAB is a program of Young Chicago Authors. All poems recorded at WBEZ Studios.</p></p> Mon, 12 May 2014 10:43:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/louder-bomb-2014-highlights-110162 Poet Rachel Jamison Webster and filmmaker Spencer Parsons read from T.S. Eliot's The Four Quartets http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/poet-rachel-jamison-webster-and-filmmaker-spencer-parsons-read-ts-eliots-four-quartets <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/T.S. Eliot.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>When you mention T.S. Eliot and then refer to texts like <em>The Waste Land</em> or his magnum opus <em>The Four Quartets</em>&nbsp;you generally elicit discomfort, anger or suspicion. The feeling is that these texts are highly revered, but off limits. The fact is they are getting dusty on the shelves of university libraries. <em>The Gift</em> Series Producer Stanzi Vaubel found that when she took them off the shelves and asked Professors Rachel Jamison Webster and Spencer Parsons to talk about and perform these texts, they began to take on a re-activated meaning that has everything to do with now.</p><p>For the month of August <em>The Gift</em>&nbsp;poetry series will drop inside five literary works. These pieces are radio essays. They do not claim to be definitive or scholarly responses to these great historical texts. Instead, each piece comes out of the emotional and psychological journey taken by the listener, becoming a conversation that resonates with our own inner thoughts.</p><p>In this week&#39;s installment, Poet&nbsp;<strong>Rachel Jamison Webster</strong>&nbsp;and filmmaker&nbsp;<strong>Spencer Parsons</strong>&nbsp;read from T.S.Eliot&#39;s <em>The Four Quartets</em>.</p><p><em>First launched in April 2013 to celebrate National Poetry Month, WBEZ now continues our weekly series, </em><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/gift">The Gift</a> </u><em>&ndash; produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of </em>September: Poems<em>. This project is a collaboration with UniVerse of Poetry, a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world. &nbsp;Each piece drops us into a poets&rsquo; inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.</em></p></p> Thu, 08 Aug 2013 09:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/poet-rachel-jamison-webster-and-filmmaker-spencer-parsons-read-ts-eliots-four-quartets Poet Rachel Jamison Webster and filmmaker Spencer Parsons read from T.S.Eliot's The Waste Land http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/poet-rachel-jamison-webster-and-filmmaker-spencer-parsons-read-tseliots-waste-land <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/t s eliot.jpeg" alt="" /><p><p>When you mention T.S. Eliot and then refer to texts like <em>The Waste Land</em> or his magnum opus <em>The Four Quartets</em>&nbsp;you generally elicit discomfort, anger or suspicion. The feeling is that these texts are highly revered, but off limits. The fact is they are getting dusty on the shelves of university libraries. <em>The Gift</em> Series Producer Stanzi Vaubel found that when she took them off the shelves and asked Professors Rachel Jamison Webster and Spencer Parsons to talk about and perform these texts, they began to take on a re-activated meaning that has everything to do with now.</p><p>For the month of August <em>The Gift</em>&nbsp;poetry series will drop inside five literary works. These pieces are radio essays. They do not claim to be definitive or scholarly responses to these great historical texts. Instead, each piece comes out of the emotional and psychological journey taken by the listener, becoming a conversation that resonates with our own inner thoughts.</p><p>In this week&#39;s installment, Poet&nbsp;<strong>Rachel Jamison Webster</strong>&nbsp;and filmmaker&nbsp;<strong>Spencer Parsons</strong>&nbsp;read from T.S.Eliot&#39;s <em>The Waste Land</em>.</p><p><em>First launched in April 2013 to celebrate National Poetry Month, WBEZ now continues our weekly series, </em><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/gift">The Gift</a> </u><em>&ndash; produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of </em>September: Poems<em>. This project is a collaboration with UniVerse of Poetry, a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world. &nbsp;Each piece drops us into a poets&rsquo; inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.</em></p></p> Fri, 02 Aug 2013 10:04:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/poet-rachel-jamison-webster-and-filmmaker-spencer-parsons-read-tseliots-waste-land Parneshia Jones shares a poem for her stepfather http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/parneshia-jones-shares-poem-her-stepfather-107773 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/2photo credit Rachel Eliza Griffiths.jpg" alt="" /><p><div>This week we hear from Chicago poet Parneshia Jones, who reminds us that poetry is about connection <em>&ndash; </em>with those who have gone before and with the parents, grandparents and friends who surround us. Listen as she remembers the sweetness of sleeping beneath her grandmother&#39;s quilts and shares a poem for her stepfather <em>&ndash; </em>a poem never heard before.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Parneshia Jones</strong>&#39; debut poetry collection, <em>Vessel</em>, is forthcoming from Milkweed Additions. Parneshia is the recipient of the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Award, the Margaret Walker Short Story Award, and the Aquarius Press Legacy Award. Her work has anthologized in publications including, <em>She Walks in Beauty: A Woman&#39;s Journey Through Poems</em> edited by Caroline Kennedy, and <em>The Ringing Ear: Black Poets Lean South</em> edited by Nikky Finney. Jones is a member of the <a href="http://www.affrilachianpoets.org/">Affrilachian Poets</a> and serves on the board of Cave Canem and Global Writes. She currently holds positions as Sales and Subsidiary Rights Manager and Poetry Editor at Northwestern University Press.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>First launched in April 2013 to celebrate National Poetry Month, WBEZ now continues our weekly series, </em>The Gift<em> &ndash; produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of </em>September: Poems<em>. This project is a collaboration with UniVerse of Poetry, a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world. &nbsp;Each piece drops us into a poets&rsquo; inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Wed, 19 Jun 2013 14:24:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/parneshia-jones-shares-poem-her-stepfather-107773 Poetry Saloon at Noon & the Sulzer Library http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/poetry-saloon-noon-sulzer-library-107730 <p><div>Twenty-five years ago, saloon poetry and slam poetry were being birthed in the vibrant arts scene in the Wicker Park neighborhood of Chicago. &nbsp;Saloon poetry differed from slam poetry in several important ways. &nbsp;Sometimes poets simply wanted to recite their poetry. &nbsp; They wanted an alternative to the raucous competition of the poetry slams. &nbsp;Poets and artists that built community, sometimes just wanted to relax and enjoy the abundance of poetry, art, and music that flourished in the mid-80&#39;s. &nbsp;Spend time in the neighborhood bar, coffee house, tea house, or gallery and be surrounded by other artists.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Saloon Poetry was the slam&#39;s after-party. &nbsp;And Saloon Poetry&#39;s red-carpet was the sidewalk that led to a favored oasis, that served beverages and nourishment and most of all, fostered camaraderie and friendly competition.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Poetry Saloon at Noon is the brick &amp; mortar venue of the poetry &amp; arts publishing website, www.SaloonPoetry.com. The venue has rotated between different sites in the city and usually features an open-mic.&nbsp;</div><div><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/CPL-webstory_39.jpg" title="" /></div><div>Recorded Live Monday, June 10, 2013 at the Chicago Public Library&#39;s Sulzer Regional Library.</div></p> Mon, 10 Jun 2013 12:45:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/poetry-saloon-noon-sulzer-library-107730 Jay Ponteri muses on marriage http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/jay-ponteri-muses-marriage-107497 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/ELW-jay-ponteri-cropped.jpg" alt="" /><p><div>If we are always changing, how do we enter into relation with another person? How do we evolve with someone else, instead of away from them? &nbsp;Jay Ponteri, author of the lyrical book, <em>Wedlocked</em>, lets us in on the truth of his life and marriage. He admits to a brokenness, which on the surface could seem to be an unraveling, but ultimately comes from a willingness to see what is real in all of its flawed confusion. &nbsp;Jay reminds us that a deeper relationship is always possible if we do not become fixed or believe ourselves to be whole in a way that is final. To overtly resist change is to deny life. &nbsp;And to will change, constantly, is to live. &nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Jay Ponteri </strong>is the author of the new, acclaimed book, <em>Wedlocked </em>(Hawthorne Press, 2013). He directs the undergraduate creative writing program at Marylhurst University and Show: Tell, The Workshop for Teen Writers &amp; Artists. He is the founding editor of both the online literary magazine <em>M Review </em>and HABIT Books. His work has appeared in <em>Tin House</em>, <em>Puerto Del Sol</em>, <em>Seattle Review</em>. His essay &ldquo;Listen to This&rdquo; was chosen as a Notable Essay in <em>The Best American Essays 2010</em>. &nbsp;Jay lives in Portland, Oregon, with his wife and son.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">First launched in April 2013 to celebrate National Poetry Month, WBEZ now continues our weekly series,&nbsp;</em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/gift" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">The Gift</a><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;&ndash; produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of</em><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">September: Poems</span><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">. This project is a collaboration with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.universeofpoetry.org/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">UniVerse of Poetry</a>, a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world. &nbsp;Each piece drops us into a poets&rsquo; inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.</em></div></p> Mon, 03 Jun 2013 14:54:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/jay-ponteri-muses-marriage-107497 Quiz: Who wrote this poem? http://www.wbez.org/blogs/claire-zulkey/2013-05/quiz-who-wrote-poem-107429 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/flickr.jpg" style="height: 333px; width: 500px;" title="(Flickr/Reid)" />SONGBIRDS OF MERIDA</p><p>I carry you with me into the stillness</p><p>into the shadows of the sun.</p><p>Here my thoughts alight: tiny buntings</p><p>settling in amid the distant sound of brass.</p><p>Dancing without moving, holding</p><p>until holding feels familiar.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>At dawn the urge to move again</p><p>becomes so intense I take to flight,</p><p>emboldened by what you said</p><p>that one fine morning.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>TOGETHER is a place I won&#39;t soon forget.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><em>Click <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/zulkey/8891088806/" target="_blank">here</a> to discover the author and source of this poem.</em></p><p><em>Follow Claire Zulkey <a href="https://twitter.com/Zulkey">@Zulkey</a></em></p></p> Thu, 30 May 2013 09:11:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/claire-zulkey/2013-05/quiz-who-wrote-poem-107429 Kwame Dawes sings of Jamaica http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/kwame-dawes-sings-jamaica-107343 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/dawes.png" alt="" /><p><p>Imagination is the seed of empathy &ndash; a centrally important function &ndash; and both the gift and burden of the writer. &nbsp;Here <em>The Gift</em> series producer Stanzi Vaubel talks to poet Kwame Dawes, who writes in many voices, and who laughs that this is the curse of the writer. &ldquo;I live in you, I feel everything,&rdquo; he says to his brother. &nbsp;Here he shares a poem called &ldquo;Impossible Flight&rdquo; in which he observes the 1980 Revolution in Jamaica and tries to hold his brother to earth &ndash; to its beauty and its pains.</p><p><br /><strong>Kwame Dawes</strong> is the author of 16 award-winning books of poetry, including <em>Wisteria</em>, <em>Hope&rsquo;s Hospice</em>, <em>Wheels</em>, and his most recent book of selected poems, <em>Duppy Conquerer</em>, which he reads from here. Dawes has also written novels and scholarly work and plays, fifteen of which have been produced. &nbsp;He has won an Emmy Award for his Pulitzer-supported project &ldquo;LiveHopeLove.com,&rdquo; in which he reported on H.I.V., Aids in post-earthquake Haiti. &nbsp;Dawes was born in Ghana and raised in Jamaica.</p><p><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">First launched in April 2013 to celebrate National Poetry Month, WBEZ now continues our weekly series, </em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/gift" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">The Gift</a><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;&ndash; produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of&nbsp;</em><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">September: Poems</span><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">. This project is a collaboration with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.universeofpoetry.org/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">UniVerse of Poetry</a>, a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world. &nbsp;Each piece drops us into a poets&rsquo; inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.</em></p></p> Thu, 23 May 2013 16:52:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/kwame-dawes-sings-jamaica-107343 Lois Lowry shares the pain and pleasure of memory http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/lois-lowry-shares-pain-and-pleasure-memory-107193 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/lowry310x230.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>In an interview with <em>The Gift</em> series producer Stanzi Vaubel, writer Lois Lowry talked about memory. In her novel,&nbsp;<em>The&nbsp;</em><em>Giver</em>, one person holds the memories for the entire community. When the Giver grows old, someone must be chosen to receive the memories. Jonah, the new receiver, is confused. &quot;I thought there was only us. I thought there was only now,&quot; &nbsp;he says. &nbsp;The Giver replies &quot;No, there&#39;s so much more. &nbsp;There&#39;s all that is elsewhere. All that goes back and back and back. It&#39;s how wisdom comes. It&#39;s how we shape our future.&quot;</p><div>Jonah&#39;s confusion and the Giver&rsquo;s response speaks to us, reflecting the negotiation that must always take place between the present and the past. Can we have one without the other? Can we appreciate the immediacy of the now if we don&#39;t feel the echoes and shouts, insights and wisdom of those who came before?</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The Giver is weighted with his memories. He has been made old and tired by them. But as Jonah begins to receive, he realizes that there is pleasure mixed with pain, that opposite emotions are inextricably linked. That&#39;s what a memory is. &nbsp;Jonah doesn&#39;t understand why the community has sterilized themselves from memory, leading to a one-dimensional existence. What he has experienced from the Giver has changed him, but it is a change that is awakening, and one that he wishes to share.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Lois Lowry</strong> is the author of more than thirty children&rsquo;s books, and an autobiography. She won the Newberry Award for <em>Number the Stars</em> (1989) and <em>The Giver</em> (1993). Two years after <em>The Giver</em> was published, Lowry&rsquo;s son Grey was killed in a fighter plane crash, allowing her to more poignantly examine the pain &ndash; and beauty &ndash; of memory. Lowry continues to write and read from her work. &quot;I am a grandmother now,&rdquo; she wrote on her blog. &ldquo;For my own grandchildren &ndash; and for all those of their generation &ndash; I try, through writing, to convey my passionate awareness that we live intertwined on this planet and that our future depends upon our caring more, and doing more, for one another.&quot;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">First launched in April 2013 to celebrate National Poetry Month, WBEZ now continues our weekly series, </em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/gift" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">The Gift</a><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;&ndash; produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of&nbsp;</em><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">September: Poems</span><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">. This project is a collaboration with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.universeofpoetry.org/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">UniVerse of Poetry</a>, a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world. &nbsp;Each piece drops us into a poets&rsquo; inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.</em></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 17 May 2013 05:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/lois-lowry-shares-pain-and-pleasure-memory-107193