WBEZ | foreign aid http://www.wbez.org/tags/foreign-aid Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Princeton economist wins Nobel for research into poverty http://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-10-12/princeton-economist-wins-nobel-research-poverty-113299 <p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" ap="" class="image-original_image" for="" human="" immense="" importance="" in="" least="" mel="" not="" photo="" poor="" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP_503453441983.jpg" style="height: 451px; width: 600px;" title="Angus Deaton gestures at a gathering at Princeton University after it was announced that he won the Nobel prize in economics for improving understanding of poverty and how people in poor countries respond to changes in economic policy Monday, Oct. 12, 2015, in Princeton, N.J. Deaton, 69, won the 8 million Swedish kronor (about $975,000) prize from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for work that the award committee said has had " /></div><p>The Nobel Prize in economics was awarded today to a Princeton economist from Scotland for his research into poverty.&nbsp;Angus Deaton told reporters on a conference call that he was pleased the committee decided to award work that concerns the poor people of the world.</p><p>&ldquo;There are enormous numbers of people in the world &ndash; the World Bank has just come out with recent estimates of about 700 million people &ndash; who live in something close to destitution,&rdquo; he said.</p><p><em>Here &amp; Now&rsquo;s</em> Jeremy Hobson looks at Deaton&rsquo;s work and its real-world impact withDerek Thompson&nbsp;of The Atlantic.</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/10/12/nobel-economics-angus-deaton" target="_blank"><em>via Here &amp; Now</em></a></p></p> Mon, 12 Oct 2015 14:44:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-10-12/princeton-economist-wins-nobel-research-poverty-113299 A behavioral economist on what works, and what falls flat, in global poverty relief http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-01-31/behavioral-economist-what-works-and-what-falls-flat-global-poverty-relie <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//segment/photo/2012-January/2012-01-31/Maternal Health_Haiti.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>When it comes to global poverty, there’s often a gap between the billions we pour in and the outcomes that actually result. A behavioral economist at Yale University, <a href="http://karlan.yale.edu/" target="_blank">Dean Karlan</a> is trying to uncover the reasons behind this gap.</p><p>Dean is co-author of a new book called <a href="http://www.poverty-action.org/book/index.html" target="_blank"><em>More than Good Intentions: How a New Economics if Helping to Solve Global Poverty</em></a>. It's a <em>Freakanomics</em>-style guide to development projects that work and projects that just don’t make the cut.</p><p>Dean tells <em>Worldview</em> what the world needs to do to make sure every dollar that's donated makes a difference in reducing global poverty.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><em>Dean Karlan is speaking this evening at the Buffet Center at Northwestern University, at 5PM. Read more about the event <a href="http://planitpurple.northwestern.edu/event/426611" target="_blank">here</a>.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 31 Jan 2012 16:40:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-01-31/behavioral-economist-what-works-and-what-falls-flat-global-poverty-relie