WBEZ | Kurdistan http://www.wbez.org/tags/kurdistan Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Iraqi Kurdistan's first English-speaking Shakespeare troupe http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-04-26/segment/iraqi-kurdistans-first-english-speaking-shakespeare-troupe-98585 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/20120402__iraqactors~1_400.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Across the Middle East, William Shakespeare is just as much of a literary staple as he is in the United States. That is, if you switch out classical English for classical Arabic, swap Hamlet for an Arabian prince, and assign opposing Sunni and Shia&rsquo; identities to the star-crossed lovers. But in Iraqi Kurdistan, a student Shakespeare troupe at the <a href="http://www.auis.edu.iq" target="_blank">American University of Sulaimani</a> is becoming internationally recognized for performing the Bard&#39;s plays in their original tongue. <em>Worldview </em>talks with troupe director Peter Friedrich and actor Ahmad Muhammad Taha about the role of theater in Iraq and the challenges of emulating the Shakespearean language, culture, and time period.</p></p> Thu, 26 Apr 2012 14:13:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-04-26/segment/iraqi-kurdistans-first-english-speaking-shakespeare-troupe-98585 Syria’s Kurds complicate Turkey’s approach toward Assad http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-03-26/syria%E2%80%99s-kurds-complicate-turkey%E2%80%99s-approach-toward-assad-97629 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2012-March/2012-03-26/AP120321033140.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Once one of Syria’s closest allies, Turkey has been a vocal opponent of Assad’s violent crackdown against anti-government protesters. But while Turkish <a href="http://topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference/timestopics/people/e/recep_tayyip_erdogan/index.html" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan</a> has talked tough, he’s stopped short of military intervention. One major reason for the restraint is Turkey’s volatile relationship with the region’s Kurds. While Kurds only make up about ten to 15 percent of Syria's population, their allegiances are crucial to understanding the potential for broader instability in the region. <em>Worldview </em>discusses the Kurdish situation with <a href="http://bped.me/about" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Ali Ezzatyar</a>, attorney and director of the steering committee for the <a href="http://bped.me/" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Berkeley Program on Entrepreneurship and Democracy in the Middle East</a>.</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 26 Mar 2012 16:33:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-03-26/syria%E2%80%99s-kurds-complicate-turkey%E2%80%99s-approach-toward-assad-97629