WBEZ | #ChicagoNATO http://www.wbez.org/tags/chicagonato Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Caption this: Mayor Emanuel thanks South Loop residents at Red Line Station http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-05/caption-mayor-emanuel-thanks-south-loop-residents-red-line-station-99436 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/rahm%20in%20red.jpg" title="(Photo courtesy of the Mayor's Office)" /></p><p>This morning has been one of <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-police-get-high-marks-nato-protests-99426">back-patting</a> and <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-police-receive-free-white-sox-tickets-99432">thanks </a>to <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/emanuel-nato-summit-marketing-tool-chicago-99416">officials </a>and police for all the hard work put into this weekend&#39;s NATO events.</p><p>Like all things in Chicago, there are knowns that go unsaid, and the big ones are thanking the police officers for not evoking scenes of the &#39;68 Democratic Convention, the protesters for not burning down the South Loop and to residents for dealing with the Doom&#39;s Day scenarios the media have been girding for.</p><p>As a final thank you,&nbsp;Mayor Rahm Emanuel stopped by the Roosevelt &#39;L&#39; stop to greet commuters this morning, and thanked them for the &quot;hospitality they showed world leaders, journalists and visitors during the NATO Summit.&quot;</p><p>We&#39;d like to invite our readers to give their thanks to the officials for NATO.&nbsp;</p><p>Feel free to caption this photo in the comments below.</p></p> Tue, 22 May 2012 14:37:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-05/caption-mayor-emanuel-thanks-south-loop-residents-red-line-station-99436 Chicago police to receive free White Sox tickets http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-police-receive-free-white-sox-tickets-99432 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/1569879981_84061d40a7_b.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>CHICAGO &mdash; Chicago police officers will get free tickets to a White Sox game as a thank you for their service during the NATO summit.</p><p>Chicago White Sox Chairman Jerry Reinsdorf announced Tuesday that all sworn Chicago officers will receive two complimentary tickets to one of ten select games this season. The team also plans to honor Chicago police officers during Wednesday&#39;s game at U.S. Cellular Field against the Minnesota Twins.</p><p>Reinsdorf says Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel asked the White Sox to help the city honor the police officers. Reinsdorf called the police &quot;true Chicago heroes.&quot;</p></p> Tue, 22 May 2012 12:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-police-receive-free-white-sox-tickets-99432 Chicago police get high marks for NATO protests http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-police-get-high-marks-nato-protests-99426 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/5732scr_11997cf190db8e5.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>CHICAGO &mdash; The sight of Chicago police raising billy clubs against demonstrators Sunday was the kind of image that has dogged the city&#39;s police force longer than most of those who clashed with protesters have been alive.</p><p>But Monday, a day after the clash during the NATO summit played out on television, virtually no one was talking about a &quot;police riot,&quot; as they did in 1968 when baton-wielding officers waded into crowds of demonstrators during the Democratic National Convention. Nor was there the kind of criticism that was leveled at the Seattle police after a violence-plagued 1999 international summit.</p><p>Protest leaders outside the venue where President Barack Obama was meeting with world leaders offered a harsh assessment of police tactics. But most others praised the police for their restraint, and in public, they performed mostly as Superintendent Garry McCarthy vowed they would, from their crowd-control tactics to their interactions with protesters.</p><p>&quot;We got them trained and equipped, and they executed the plan on all levels,&quot; McCarthy said, on the street Monday during a march outside Boeing Co. headquarters. &quot;It hasn&#39;t been that big of a deal, quite frankly. It&#39;s almost like it was harder dealing with the hype than the event itself.&quot;</p><p>Chicago police spokeswoman Carolyn Deming said late Monday that 90 people were arrested and eight officers were injured before and during the summit. Authorities said many of those arrested were released without charges being filed.</p><p>McCarthy, who literally stood behind his troops pointing and shouting orders during the worst clashes with protesters, said Chicago&#39;s performance dealing with the protests was a &quot;how-to&quot; for other cities. &quot;And that is to be patient and tolerant,&quot; he said.</p><p>The assessment was shared by some who have studied the department and its history of brutality.</p><p>&quot;I think they helped their reputation,&quot; said Craig Futterman, a University of Chicago law professor. &quot;Generally speaking, the CPD seemed to exercise an extraordinary amount of restraint.&quot;</p><p>From what can be assessed from publically available accounts, officers only used their batons in face-to-face confrontations with protesters pushing against police lines, what McCarthy called &quot;assaults&quot; on his officers. They used bicycles, both to escort protesters and as portable barricades. They employed intelligence gathering, starting long before the summit. That led to the arrests of five men on terror-related charges &mdash; including three accused of making Molotov cocktails in a plot to attack President Obama&#39;s campaign headquarters and other targets &mdash; days before the summit started.</p><p>Perhaps most significantly was the way officers handled alleged troublemakers. McCarthy said the officers were training to &quot;surgically extract&quot; individuals who broke the law in a way that disrupted crowds as little as possible &mdash; in contrast to confronting entire crowds as the department had done in the past.</p><p>On Sunday night, for example, a few minutes after a full water bottle flew out of a crowd of protesters and into a phalanx of riot gear-clad officers in front of the Art Institute of Chicago, a team of five or six officers emerged, rushing across the street.</p><p>In seconds, they had grabbed the man they thought was responsible, dragged him back across the street and through their own front line of officers that opened up long enough for them to get by before closing ranks again.</p><p>Though there was some shouting, protesters appeared to accept what they&#39;d just seen, with some demonstrators even joking to each other that the police had, in fact, captured the man who threw the bottle.</p><p>What they didn&#39;t see was the officers, in the minutes before the arrest, pass information to each other about who they thought threw the bottle, telling each other what he was wearing.</p><p>In fact, the officers may have had help. A key component in the plan to target individuals was using what is widely considered the most extensive surveillance system in the United States. Inside the city&#39;s emergency center, what was happening wherever protesters gathered was being watched on what looks like a movie screen, and the information being relayed back to the commanders on the street.</p><p>Officials at the Office of Emergency Management and Communications could not immediately say whether emergency workers at the center aided in that arrest but said they provided information that helped officers identify individuals who broke the law during Sunday&#39;s protest.</p><p>If that kind of communication helped police, there was one incident in which a lack of communication led to what was perhaps one of the most ominous scenes of the weekend: Those minutes when officer after officer could be seen putting on gas masks.</p><p>McCarthy said what started as radio traffic of a single protester wearing a gas mask turned into talk among the officers that turned into what many thought was an order to prepare.</p><p>&quot;I said, wait a minute, I&#39;m the one who is supposed to give the order for gas,&quot; McCarthy said. And, he said, he hadn&#39;t done that. &quot;That was just a miscommunication.&quot;</p><p>Not everybody agreed the police acted properly. Whatever violence there was, said Joe Iosbaker, a protest organizer, was the fault of police, not the protesters. And he tried to compare the events with what happened on the city&#39;s streets in 1968. Dozens were arrested, and protest leaders reported a number of people injured.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s not the same proportion, but the images have to be discussed in that context,&quot; he said.</p><p>But other protesters didn&#39;t see it that way. Liz Floyd, of Ohio, 26, wondered why there were so many police on the street but did not think that those she saw used excessive force.</p><p>&quot;I think they behaved overall,&quot; she said.</p><p>The police were roundly praised by Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who had worked hard to lure the summit and likely had the most to lose if it did not go well. He said he personally thanked more than 400 officers.</p><p>&quot;They did a tremendous job under very stressful circumstances over the last four days, and they make every one of us proud,&quot; he said. &quot;I wasn&#39;t there, but I do know this: They showed the city and the country why they are the finest police department in the country.&quot;</p><p>Futterman said that video shot by protesters, observers and the Police Department &mdash; and the many security cameras around the city &mdash; ultimately might show what mistakes police made.</p><p>But he said there is no disputing that police could have turned a tense situation into something much worse had they used their billy clubs more aggressively, used so-called sound cannons to create ear splitting noise or doused protesters with pepper spray.</p><p>&quot;They had all that (at their disposal) and they didn&#39;t go there,&quot; he said.</p></p> Tue, 22 May 2012 11:18:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-police-get-high-marks-nato-protests-99426 Get to know your protester: Anti-NATO fashion http://www.wbez.org/get-know-your-protester-anti-nato-fashion-99365 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/421 code pink dude horiz.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Sunday&#39;s protests around the NATO Summit in Chicago drew thousands of protesters and almost as many different fashion sensibilities. WBEZ&#39;s Dan Weissmann perused the goings-on at Grant Park and asked protesters about their choice of costume for the big day.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p style="text-align: center; "><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="331" mozallowfullscreen="" src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/42519242" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="500"></iframe></p></p> Sun, 20 May 2012 20:06:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/get-know-your-protester-anti-nato-fashion-99365 Demonstrators rolls on http://www.wbez.org/news/demonstrators-rolls-99362 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/RS5795_AP120520062254-scr.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A protest has cropped up downtown near the Art&nbsp;Institute of Chicago, hours after a major march against the NATO&nbsp;summit ended.</p><p>Hundreds of protesters gathered Sunday night outside of the&nbsp;museum where first lady Michelle Obama was hosting a dinner for&nbsp;spouses of NATO leaders. At least 100 Chicago police officers are&nbsp;on the scene. They brandished riot gear, including helmets and batons.</p><p>Their gathering follows an impromptu protest through downtown.&nbsp;At one point a few police officers with shields tackled a&nbsp;protester.</p><p>Earlier in the day, it was a tense scene following a march near&nbsp;McCormick Place where NATO leaders met Sunday. Police officers and&nbsp;protesters were in a standoff and there were a few injuries and&nbsp;arrests as officers tried to clear the scene.</p><p>Thousands of protesters marched through downtown Chicago on Sunday in one of the city&#39;s largest demonstrations in years, airing grievances about war, climate change and a wide range of other complaints as world leaders assembled for a NATO summit.</p><p>The protest, which for months had stirred worries about violence in the streets, drew together a broad assortment of participants, including peace activists joining with war veterans and people more focused on economic inequality. But the diversity of opinions also sowed doubts about whether there were too many messages to be effective.</p><p>And some of the most enduring images of the event were likely to be from the end &mdash; when a small group of demonstrators clashed with a line of police who tried to keep them from the lakeside convention center where President Barack Obama was hosting the gathering.</p><p>The protesters tried to move east toward McCormick Place, with some hurling sticks and bottles at police. Officers responded by swinging their batons. The two sides were locked in a standoff for nearly two hours, with police blocking the protesters&#39; path and the crowd refusing to leave. Some protesters had blood streaming down their faces.</p><p>By early evening, authorities were seen making arrests one by one and leading individual demonstrators away in handcuffs.</p><p>Esther Westlake, a recent graduate of Northeastern Illinois University, marveled at the size of the crowd. She said she had been involved in marches protesting the Iraq War in Chicago but never one this big.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s crazy. There&#39;s so many people here,&quot; she said. &quot;Having NATO in town is kind of exciting.&quot;</p><p>But she wondered whether the political agendas of the protesters were too unfocused to get diplomats&#39; attention.</p><p>&quot;It seems like there&#39;s so many messages and people aren&#39;t really sure what they want to get accomplished,&quot; Westlake said. &quot;People just need to figure out what their argument is going to be.&quot;</p><p>She worried that some protesters participated simply &quot;to do stupid things&quot; and cause trouble.</p><p>Some participants called for the dissolution of NATO, the 63-year-old military alliance that is holding its 25th formal meeting in Chicago. It is the first time the summit has been held in a U.S. city other than Washington.</p><p>Diplomats at the meeting planned to discuss the war in Afghanistan, European missile defense and other international security matters.</p><p>&quot;Basically NATO is used to keep the poor poor and the rich rich,&quot; said John Schraufnagel, who traveled from Minneapolis to Chicago for the march. Since the end of the Cold War, he said, the alliance has become &quot;the enforcement arm of the ruling 1 percent, of the capitalist 1 percent.&quot;</p><p>The march lacked the size and single message that shaped the last major protest moment in Chicago, when nearly half a million people filled the city&#39;s downtown in 2006 to protest making it a felony to be an illegal immigrant.</p><p>At one point, dozens of protesters in black clothing surged toward a much smaller group of police, throwing objects at them. The badly outnumbered officers fought back with truncheons, and people on both sides threw punches. As police reinforcements moved in, the pack of violent protesters fled.</p><p>Authorities had planned to provide heightened security along the march route to protect people and property.</p><p>But unseasonably warm temperatures raised concerns about the safety of the marchers themselves. The city provided water, rest stations and cooling buses along the 2&frac12;-mile protest route.</p><p>The heat offered an unexpected benefit for police: making it easier to spot potential troublemakers.</p><p>Before the summit, officers were told to keep an eye out for people wearing bulky clothing that could hide weapons or big pieces of cardboard that protesters could use to shield themselves against rubber bullets. But anyone wearing overcoats or sweatshirts was conspicuous on a 90-degree day, when many people wore T-shirts and shorts.</p><p>Organizers of Sunday&#39;s rally had initially predicted tens of thousands of protesters this weekend. But that was when the G-8 summit of leading industrial nations was also scheduled to be in Chicago. Earlier this year, President Barack Obama moved the Group of Eight economic meeting to Camp David, the secluded retreat in rural Maryland.</p><p>Chicago kept the NATO summit, which is not addressing the economy specifically. That left activists with the challenge of persuading groups as diverse as teachers, nurses and union laborers to show up for the Chicago protests even though the summit&#39;s main focus doesn&#39;t align with their most heart-felt issues.</p><p>At the end of the march, police appeared to be using precisely the tactics Superintendent Garry McCarthy said they would &mdash; extracting individuals from the crowd and quickly getting them away from the rest of the demonstrators.</p><p>Several times they could be seen pulling protesters into a line of officers, which parted briefly before quickly closing ranks again.</p><p>Police also used &quot;sound cannons&quot; to give orders to demonstrators and tried to relieve officers who had become fatigued to help prevent any escalation in violence.</p><p>The demonstrations unfolded just a day after three activists who traveled to Chicago for the summit were accused of manufacturing Molotov cocktails in a plot to attack Obama&#39;s campaign headquarters, Emanuel&#39;s home and other targets.</p><p>Defense lawyers argued that the police had trumped up the charges to frighten away peaceful protesters. They told a judge it was undercover officers who brought the firebombs to an apartment on Chicago&#39;s South Side where the men were arrested.</p><p>On Sunday, police said two other men were also in custody on charges they discussed making bombs prior to the summit. Authorities said the pair was not connected to the earlier arrests, although defense attorneys said all five were targeted by authorities to scare protesters away from the meeting.</p></p> Sun, 20 May 2012 18:37:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/demonstrators-rolls-99362 Video: Tom Morello: Rehearsal at NATO summit rally http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-05/video-tom-morello-rehearsal-nato-summit-rally-99360 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Screen shot 2012-05-20 at 6.26.38 PM.png" alt="" /><p><p>Rehearsal footage by Dan Weissmann of WBEZ on Sunday, May 20, 2012. Morello played for protesters who descended onto Chicago for the NATO summit.&nbsp;The tune in this rehearsal is called &quot;Stray Bullets,&quot; recorded as &quot;The Nightwatchman,&quot; from a 2011 album called &quot;World Wide Rebel Songs.&quot;</p><p style="text-align: center; "><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="375" mozallowfullscreen="" src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/42514978" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="500"></iframe></p></p> Sun, 20 May 2012 18:24:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-05/video-tom-morello-rehearsal-nato-summit-rally-99360 Police probe possible cyberattack on city of Chicago website by Anonymous http://www.wbez.org/news/police-probe-possible-cyberattack-city-chicago-website-anonymous-99352 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Screen shot 2012-05-20 at 11.25.06 AM_0.png" alt="" /><p><p>The <a href="http://www.cityofchicago.org/">city of Chicago&#39;s website </a>was alleged to have been brought down by a possible cyberattack by the hacker group Anonymous. And, while the city was fending off cyberattacks on its websites, several Twitter accounts claiming to be affiliated with Anonymous also called for assaults on NATO&rsquo;s homepage. Despite that, the NATO site has remained online for much of Sunday afternoon.</p><p>At McCormick Place, NATO Assistant Secretary General of Emerging Security Challenges, Gabor Icklody, said cyber defense is a high priority for the alliance. But he appeared to downplay the threat posed by so-called &ldquo;hacktivist&rdquo; groups.</p><p>&ldquo;We shouldn&#39;t imagine that a sixteen-[year]-old from the darkness of his room can bring very, very large networks down,&rdquo; he said, adding that the biggest threat comes from cyberwarfare between countries.</p><p>A YouTube video posted Sunday seemed to confirm that the group was taking responsibility for the attacks on the city of Chicago websites. The video became private/unavailable shortly after posting.</p><p>&quot;What we saw tonight watching a bit of the protest was everyday, average people fighting back and finally refusing to stand down. The NATO Summit is being utilized in such a way, and we couldn&#39;t have predicted it more accurately,&quot; a masked person read in a statement.</p><p>The city of Chicago is looking into whether hacking is responsible for outages of both the city of Chicago&#39;s own site as well as the Chicago police department&#39;s site.<br />&ldquo;We are aware of the potential issue with the city&rsquo;s website and are working with the appropriate federal authorities to address the situation,&rdquo; said Pete Scales, spokesman for the city of Chicago.</p><p>The U.S. Secret Service is also investigating the outages.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Statement text prior to being disabled on YouTube:</strong></p><p><em><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; ">Greetings fellow citizens of the world, we are AntiS3curityOPS.</span><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; ">While this has come to no surprise, the NATO protests are already reaching a boiling point. As tonight we have already witnessed the Chicago Police Dept sending out a request for two water cannons deployed on Michigan Avenue, which the protesters briefly were able to close of the street completely. Just a few moments ago we witnessed cops on horses seemingly all too content with the destiny that has turned their hearts cold, trampling over protesters trying to intimidate. And you know what we saw during this? Protesters locking arms and holding their ground. A few had Anonymous masks&#39; on, a few were girls who looked like they belonged safely off on the sidelines bravely charging cops with shields and on horse. All the while the protesters are chanting &quot;Take those animals off those horses&quot;, drowning out any attempts by the Chicago police to get a word in. Everyone of you are hero&#39;s to us.</span><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; ">What we saw tonight watching a bit of the protest was everyday, average people fighting back and finally refusing to stand down. The NATO Summit is being utilized in such a way, and we couldn&#39;t have predicted it more accurately. On the video we saw Mother&#39;s, teenagers, elderly, the anarchists, white, black, hispanic, this movement see&#39;s no skin color. every sort of person is well represented in these actions.</span><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; ">This is not a time to have our differences divide us, this is a time we all need to come together and rally around our brother&#39;s and sister&#39;s bravely in the street&#39;s of Chicago risking their lives to make the one voice they have, heard. If every single one of us has a voice, one opinion, let us unite and show the violent Chicago police, and the government big brother tactic&#39;s that we are not gonna take this.</span><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; ">We are actively engaged in actions against the Chicago Police Deptartment, and encourage anyone to take up the cause and use the AntiS3curityOPS Anonymous banner. For those able, chicagopolice.org should be fired upon as much as possible. We are in your harbor Chicago, and you will not forget us.</span><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; ">So for those unable to engage in attacks online by ddos, share with everyone you know what&#39;s presently going on in Chicago, Tweet celebrities on twitter with the #SolidarityWithChicago #FuckNATO #FTP hashtags and get it trending. Also keep watching the live feed&#39;s, and spreading the live feed links all relevant places. Together, we the people, are gonna take the power back.</span><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; ">We are AntiS3curityOPS.</span><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; ">We are Anonymous.</span><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; ">We are legion.</span><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; ">We do not forget.</span><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; ">We do not forgive.&nbsp;</span><br style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; " /><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; ">Chicago Police Deptartment, expect us.</span></em></p></p> Sun, 20 May 2012 16:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/police-probe-possible-cyberattack-city-chicago-website-anonymous-99352 Steep bond for NATO protesters held on bomb charges http://www.wbez.org/news/steep-bond-nato-protesters-held-bomb-charges-99354 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Gelsomino1cropscale.jpg" style="margin: 4px 0px 0px 0px; float: left; width: 177px; height: 230px;" title="Defense attorney Sarah Gelsomino on Sunday afternoon calls the amounts ‘punitive.’ (WBEZ/Chip Mitchell)" /></div><p>A Cook County judge set steep bonds Sunday afternoon for two more activists accused of planning violence during the NATO summit.</p><p>Criminal Court Judge Israel Desierto set a $750,000 bond for Sebastian Senakiewicz, 24, a Chicago resident charged with falsely making a terrorist threat. Desierto set a $500,000 bond for Mark Neiweem, 28, a Chicago resident charged with solicitation for explosives or incendiary devices.</p><p>&ldquo;These bonds are extremely high and punitively so, as a result of the sensationalized and politicized allegations that the state&rsquo;s attorneys raised today,&rdquo; said Sarah Gelsomino, an attorney representing the defendants.</p><p>Jack Blakey, head of special prosecutions for the Cook County State&rsquo;s Attorney&rsquo;s Office, declined to comment about the bond hearing after reading a prepared statement about the charges.</p><p>Blakey said Senakiewicz identified himself as an anarchist and part of the Black Bloc movement and claimed several times he had bombs. At one point, Senakiewicz said he had &ldquo;two homemade explosives that could blow up half of an overpass for a train and that he was holding off on using them until NATO,&rdquo; Blakey said. Prosecutors said a search of Senakiewicz&rsquo;s home did not turn up any explosives.</p><p>Blakey said Neiweem told an associate about a store where materials to make a pipe bomb could be purchased, then &ldquo;pressed a piece of paper into the palm of the associate&rsquo;s hand and stated that, if the associate obtained the items and brought them to his house, then they could create a bomb.&rdquo;</p><p>On Saturday, Cook County Judge Edward S. Harmening set $1.5 million bonds for three other activists, all charged with terrorism conspiracy, possession of explosives or incendiary devices and providing material support for terrorism. Authorities accused the trio of possessing Molotov cocktails and planning or proposing attacks on President Barack Obama&rsquo;s campaign headquarters, Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s home, four police stations and financial institutions downtown.</p><p>Prosecutors called those three defendants &ldquo;self-proclaimed anarchists&rdquo; and listed them as Jared Chase, 27, of Keene, New Hampshire; Brian Church, 22, of Fort Lauderdale, Florida; and Brent Betterly, 24, of Massachusetts.</p><p>Chase, Church and Betterly were among nine people arrested during a Wednesday night police raid in the Bridgeport neighborhood. The raid targeted the apartment of some leaders of Occupy Chicago, a group leading protests against the summit. Senakiewicz and Neiweem were arrested Thursday at other locations.</p><p>Prosecutors said all five cases stem from the same investigation.</p><p>Defense attorneys said authorities built all the cases using an informant duo &mdash; a man who went by the name &ldquo;Mo&rdquo; and a woman who went by &ldquo;Gloves.&rdquo; The attorneys said that the duo tried to manufacture crimes.</p><p>Defense attorneys also claim that authorities targeted the activists for their political beliefs.</p><p>Court filings by prosecutors state that most of the defendants self-identify as anarchists. State&rsquo;s Attorney Anita Alvarez, questioned Saturday about the relevance to the criminal case, answered that &ldquo;some of the techniques that they were exhibiting all go in line with their beliefs.&rdquo;</p><p>Another possible issue is the length of time authorities held the defendants before allowing them to go before a judge. The bond hearing for Senakiewicz and Neiweem did not occur until almost three full days after their arrests. Their attorneys say neither defendant had an earlier opportunity to see a judge.</p><p>Leonard Cavise, a DePaul University law professor, points to a 1991 judicial ruling. &ldquo;The United States Supreme Court has said that the police have an obligation to get the defendant in front of a judge as soon as practically possible but not longer than 48 hours,&rdquo; Cavise says. &ldquo;The reason we have this 48-hour rule is because we want to get the person away from the police as soon as possible before they coerce a confession out of them.&rdquo;</p><p>Violating that rule, Cavise adds, could lead a judge to throw out any confession from trial.</p><p>Sally Daly, a spokeswoman for the state&rsquo;s attorney, insisted that Senakiewicz and Neiweem were held according to the law.</p></p> Sun, 20 May 2012 16:53:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/steep-bond-nato-protesters-held-bomb-charges-99354 Protester numbers dwindle as police gain ground amid standoff at Cermak, Michigan http://www.wbez.org/news/protester-numbers-dwindle-police-gain-ground-amid-standoff-cermak-michigan-99351 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/charlieConfrontation.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>CHICAGO (AP) &mdash; Thousands of protesters marched through downtown Chicago on Sunday in one of the city&#39;s largest demonstrations in years, airing grievances about war, climate change and a wide range of other complaints as world leaders assembled for a NATO summit.</p><p>The protest, which stirred worries about violence in the streets, was largely peaceful until the end, when a small group of demonstrators clashed with a line of police who tried to keep them from the lakeside convention center where President Barack Obama is hosting the gathering.</p><p>The protesters tried to move east toward McCormick Place and threw objects at police. Some officers responded by swinging their batons. After more than an hour, the two sides were still locked in a standoff, with police blocking the protesters&#39; path and the crowd refusing to leave. Some protesters appeared to have blood streaming down their faces. Authorities were seen carrying a few people away from the scene.</p><p>Esther Westlake, a recent graduate of Northeastern Illinois University, marveled at the size of the crowd. She said she had been involved in antiwar marches before the war in Iraq in Chicago, but had never seen one this big.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s crazy. There&#39;s so many people here,&quot; she said. &quot;Having NATO in town is kind of exciting.&quot;</p><p>But some participants wondered whether the protest agenda was too unfocused to get the diplomats&#39; attention.</p><p>&quot;It seems like there&#39;s so many messages and people aren&#39;t really sure what they want to get accomplished,&quot; Westlake said. &quot;People just need to figure out what their argument is going to be.&quot;</p><p>She worried that some protesters participated simply &quot;to do stupid things&quot; and cause trouble.</p><p>Some participants called for the dissolution of NATO, the 63-year-old military alliance that is holding its 25th formal meeting in Chicago. It is the first time the summit has been held in a U.S. city other than Washington.</p><p>Diplomats at the meeting planned to discuss the war in Afghanistan, European missile defense and other international security matters.</p><p>&quot;Basically NATO is used to keep the poor poor and the rich rich,&quot; said John Schraufnagel, who traveled from Minneapolis to Chicago for the march. Since the end of the Cold War, he said, the alliance has become &quot;the enforcement arm of the ruling 1 percent, of the capitalist 1 percent.&quot;</p><p>Peace activists joined with war veterans and people more focused on the economy. Marchers assembled at Grant Park with signs denouncing NATO, including ones that read: &quot;War(equals)Debt&quot; and &quot;NATO, Go Home.&quot;</p><p>But the crowd was mostly filled with protesters whose primary concerns had little to do with the discussions at the summit.</p><p>The march lacked the size and single message that shaped the last major protest moment in Chicago, when nearly half a million people filled the city&#39;s downtown in 2006 to protest making it a felony to be an illegal immigrant.</p><p>At one point, dozens of protesters in black clothing surged toward a much smaller group of police, throwing objects at them.</p><p>The badly outnumbered officers fought back with truncheons, and people on both sides threw punches. As police reinforcements moved in, the pack of violent protesters fled.</p><p>Authorities had planned for months to provide heightened security along the march route to protect people and property.</p><p>But unseasonably warm temperatures raised concerns about the safety of the marchers themselves. The city provided water, rest stations and cooling buses along the 2&frac12;-mile protest route.</p><p>The heat offered an unexpected benefit for police: making it easier to spot potential troublemakers.</p><p>Before the summit, officers were told to keep an eye out for people wearing bulky clothing that could hide weapons or big pieces of cardboard that protesters could use to shield themselves against rubber bullets. But anyone wearing overcoats or sweatshirts was conspicuous on a 90-degree day, when many people wore T-shirts and shorts.</p><p>Organizers of Sunday&#39;s rally had initially predicted tens of thousands of protesters this weekend. But that was when the G-8 summit of leading industrial nations was also scheduled to be in Chicago. Earlier this year, President Barack Obama moved the Group of 8 economic meeting to Camp David, the secluded retreat in rural Maryland.</p><p>Chicago kept the NATO summit, which is not addressing the economy specifically. That left activists with the challenge of persuading groups as diverse as teachers, nurses and union laborers to show up for the Chicago protests even though the summit&#39;s main focus doesn&#39;t align with their most heart-felt issues.</p><p>Sunday&#39;s protest followed several smaller demonstrations over the previous two days, including a march Saturday to the home of Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Obama&#39;s former chief of staff.</p><p>Later that evening, hundreds of demonstrators zigzagged through downtown, some decrying terrorism-related charges leveled against three young men earlier in the day. Eighteen people were arrested.</p><p>Police Supt. Garry McCarthy said officers would be ready with quick but targeted arrests of any demonstrators who turn violent.</p><p>&quot;If anything else happens, the plan is to go in and get the people who create the violent acts, take them out of the crowd and arrest them,&quot; warned McCarthy. &quot;We&#39;re not going to charge the crowd wholesale &mdash; that&#39;s the bottom line.&quot;</p><p>Three activists who traveled to Chicago for the summit were accused Saturday of manufacturing Molotov cocktails in a plot to attack Obama&#39;s campaign headquarters, Emanuel&#39;s home and other targets.</p><p>Defense lawyers argued that the police had trumped up the charges to frighten away peaceful protesters. They told a judge it was undercover officers who brought the firebombs to an apartment in Chicago&#39;s South Side where the men were arrested.</p><p>On Sunday, police said two other men were in custody after being accused of planning to make Molotov cocktails to be used during the NATO summit.</p><p>Sebastian Senakiewicz, 24, was charged with one felony count of terrorism/making a false threat. Mark Neiweem, 28, was charged with attempted possession of explosives. Both men were scheduled to appear in court later Sunday.</p><p>It was not immediately clear if those arrests were related to the other three.</p><p>Kris Hermes of the National Lawyers Guild said the charges seem to be part of a wider effort to scare people and diminish the size of the demonstrations.</p></p> Sun, 20 May 2012 16:38:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/protester-numbers-dwindle-police-gain-ground-amid-standoff-cermak-michigan-99351 Chicago protest organizer a celebrity among protesters http://www.wbez.org/chicago-protest-organizer-celebrity-among-protesters-99349 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/photo_11.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>While thousands of protesters march through the streets of Chicago Sunday, at least one of them has been making sure things go off without a hitch.</p><p>Chicagoan Andy Thayer is almost like a celebrity among protesters. He spent months organizing Sunday&#39;s NATO protest and, while walking around Grant Park, he was lucky to see five minutes go by without someone stopping him.</p><p>Thayer was conscious of the 90-degree heat.</p><p>&quot;Folks, please make sure you get some water, there is free water over by the blue portapotties over here,&quot; he yelled to his fellow protesters.</p><p>Moments later, he was literally running through the park to where the cops spent time fixing logistical issues. He&#39;s on a first-name basis with the cops.</p><p>But Thayer said he feels weird about his new celebrity. For him and other organizers, it&#39;s more about their message.</p><p>&quot;We have the world&#39;s one percent coming to Chicago and we want a strong message to them as possible, so we take that responsibility very, very seriously,&quot; he said.</p><p>Thayer is already working on getting people together this summer for Chicago&#39;s annual gay pride parade.</p></p> Sun, 20 May 2012 16:09:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/chicago-protest-organizer-celebrity-among-protesters-99349