WBEZ | Jared Chase http://www.wbez.org/tags/jared-chase Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Charged with terrorism, NATO protesters plead not guilty http://www.wbez.org/news/charged-terrorism-nato-protesters-plead-not-guilty-100563 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/NATO5bannerCROPSCALE.jpg" style="margin: 4px 0px 0px 0px; float: left; height: 244px; width: 300px; " title="Occupy Chicago protests Monday at the courthouse. (WBEZ/Chip Mitchell)" /><em>Updated July 2 at 3:58 p.m.</em></p><p>Three NATO protesters who face charges under Illinois&rsquo;s terrorism statute pleaded not guilty Monday in a hearing that kicked off what could turn into months of pretrial wrangling over evidence discovery.</p><p>The defendants &mdash; Brian Church, 20, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; Brent Betterly, 24, of Oakland Park, Fla.; and Jared Chase, 27, of Keene, N.H. &mdash; each face 11 felony counts ranging from material support for terrorism to arson conspiracy. Cook County prosecutors say they plotted to use crude firebombs known as Molotov cocktails during a NATO summit in Chicago.</p><p>On Monday the trio appeared in yellow jail jumpsuits and leg shackles before Criminal Court Judge Thaddeus L. Wilson.</p><p>After the pleas, Assistant State&rsquo;s Attorney Matthew Thrun told Wilson that prosecutors had handed defense attorneys 372 pages of discovery materials. Thrun said those included documentation of secret recordings authorized by another Cook County judge May 4 &mdash; less than two weeks before the trio&rsquo;s May 16 arrests during a police raid of an apartment in Chicago&rsquo;s Bridgeport neighborhood.</p><p>Thomas Durkin, a lawyer for Chase, complained to Wilson that the materials seemed to address evidence no earlier than May. The case&rsquo;s indictment, Durkin pointed out, accuses the trio of committing the terrorism and arson offenses beginning &ldquo;on or about October 01, 2011.&rdquo;</p><p>Thrun responded that &ldquo;discovery is not complete at this time.&rdquo;</p><p>After the hearing, defense attorneys said their pretrial goals include learning more about the case&rsquo;s informants. &ldquo;There&rsquo;s going to be a lot of fighting around the discovery of this case because we know that there were other law-enforcement agencies involved in the investigation and the provocateurs,&rdquo; said Michael Deutsch, an attorney for Church. &ldquo;And that&rsquo;s the tension because we need to fight about all these things that we have a right to have in discovery yet, while we do that, our clients are going to be sitting in jail.&rdquo;</p><p>Deutsch said defense attorneys would meet with prosecutors to see if they could reach an agreement to reduce $1.5 million bonds set for each defendant May 19.</p><p>At one point during Monday&#39;s hearing Betterly smiled and nodded to two dozen supporters in the courtroom gallery as they stood and raised their fists in the air &mdash; a gesture that ended seconds later when a sheriff&rsquo;s deputy ordered everyone to sit down.</p><p>Later, a man who identified himself as an Occupy Chicago activist held up a handmade sign expressing support for the trio. A deputy quickly grabbed the activist and brought him to Wilson.</p><p>&ldquo;I absolutely will not tolerate that,&rdquo; Wilson warned. &ldquo;Don&rsquo;t bring any signs in my courtroom again.&rdquo;</p><p>Another NATO protester &mdash; Sebastian Senakiewicz, 24, of Chicago &mdash; faces four counts of falsely making a terrorist threat. A fifth protester &mdash; Mark Neiweem, 28, of Chicago &mdash; faces two counts related to explosives or incendiary devices. Arraignments for Senakiewicz and Neiweem were scheduled for Monday but postponed.</p><p>All five defendants were arrested before the summit, a two-day gathering that ended May 21.</p></p> Mon, 02 Jul 2012 05:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/charged-terrorism-nato-protesters-plead-not-guilty-100563 Indictments slap NATO protesters with 11 counts http://www.wbez.org/news/indictments-slap-nato-protesters-11-counts-100275 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AlvarezAndMcCarthy3croppedscaled.jpg" style="margin: 4px 0px 0px; float: left; width: 300px; height: 209px; " title="State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez, flanked by Chicago police Supt. Garry McCarthy, last month said the men came to Chicago to harm cops and intimidate residents. (WBEZ/Chip Mitchell)" /></p><div>Cook County grand jury indictments have slapped three out-of-town protesters with 11 felony counts and a Chicago protester with 4 felony counts for allegedly plotting or threatening terrorist attacks during last month&rsquo;s NATO summit.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The counts against Brian Church, 20, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Brent Betterly, 24, of Oakland Park, Fla., and Jared Chase, 27, of Keene, N.H., include material support for terrorism, terrorism conspiracy, arson conspiracy, arson solicitation and attempted arson. The three men also face two counts of unlawful use of a weapon and four counts of possession of an incendiary device.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The Chicago resident, Sebastian Senakiewicz, 24, faces four counts of falsely making a terrorist threat.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Prosecutors in the highly publicized cases did not share the indictments with the defendants or news reporters but quietly filed them June 13 with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, where defense attorneys discovered them this week. The indictments provide no information about evidence.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;They&rsquo;re playing hide the ball,&rdquo; said Michael Deutsch, one of Church&rsquo;s lawyers. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s part of their strategy to keep the information as long as possible away from the defense to prevent the defense from beginning to prepare.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>State&rsquo;s Attorney Anita Alvarez&rsquo;s office did not return messages about the cases Wednesday. In a news conference last month, she called Church, Betterly and Chase &ldquo;domestic terrorists who came to Chicago with an anarchist agenda to harm our police officers, intimidate our citizens and to attack their politically motivated targets.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The prosecutions mark the county&rsquo;s first use of an Illinois terrorism statute enacted shortly after the al Qaeda attacks of September 11.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Defense attorneys call the cases sensationalized efforts to justify security spending for the NATO summit, a two-day Chicago gathering that ended May 21. They say the investigations relied on a pair of infiltrators who manufactured the alleged crimes.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Judges ordered Church, Betterly and Chase held on $1.5 million bonds and Senakiewicz on a $750,000 bond.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Attorneys for all four men said Wednesday they intend to enter not-guilty pleas.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>A fifth protester, Mark Neiweem, 28, of Chicago, was charged with solicitation for explosives or incendiary devices and ordered held on a $500,000 bond.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Arraignments of the five are expected July 2.</div><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Wed, 20 Jun 2012 14:33:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/indictments-slap-nato-protesters-11-counts-100275 NATO terrorism defendants kept in ‘observation’ cells http://www.wbez.org/news/nato-terrorism-defendants-kept-%E2%80%98observation%E2%80%99-cells-99442 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/RS5837_AP120519150342-scr_1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A spokesman for Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart says three anti-NATO protesters accused of planning terrorist actions have been held around-the-clock since Saturday in white-walled &ldquo;observation&rdquo; cells, where they are isolated from each other and the rest of the inmate population and kept from writing materials, books and all other media.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s for their own safety and the safety of the [jail] staff and other inmates,&rdquo; the spokesman, Frank Bilecki, said Tuesday afternoon. &ldquo;Obviously we&rsquo;re concerned about their mental status and well-being.&rdquo;</p><p>A medical staff member checks on the three every 15 minutes, Bilecki said. The cells each have one window through which natural light passes and a larger window for the observation, he added.</p><p>Gary Hickerson, acting executive director of the office&rsquo;s Department of Corrections, ordered the observation because the defendants are young and because their charges are serious, Bilecki said. The decision had nothing to do with defendants&rsquo; behavior since arrest, he added.</p><p>The sheriff&rsquo;s spokesman says the State&rsquo;s Attorney&rsquo;s office had no input into the protesters&rsquo; jail conditions.</p><p>But a lawyer for one of the alleged terrorists says the conditions amount to &ldquo;sensory deprivation&rdquo; intended to hamper their defense. &ldquo;This is a way to break someone&rsquo;s spirit and break their ability to cooperate with their attorneys,&rdquo; said the lawyer, Michael Deutsch, who represents Brian Church, 20, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.</p><p>Deutsch complained about the conditions in a court hearing about the case Tuesday afternoon. Defense attorneys said they were &ldquo;negotiating&rdquo; with jail staff members to improve the conditions.</p><p>Those talks may be paying off. Bilecki said the jail was planning to move the three protesters Tuesday evening into the general inmate population.</p><p>Church and the other protesters &mdash; Jared Chase, 27, of Keene, N.H; and Brent Betterly, 24, of Oakland Park, Fla. &mdash; face charges of terrorism conspiracy, providing material support for terrorism, and possession of explosives or incendiary devices. Cook County Judge Edward S. Harmening on Saturday set their bonds at $1.5 million each.</p><p>Authorities accused the trio of possessing Molotov cocktails and planning or proposing attacks on targets including President Barack Obama&rsquo;s campaign headquarters and Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s home. The three were among nine people arrested during a police raid last Wednesday at the South Side apartment of some Occupy Chicago leaders who helped organize protests against the NATO summit.</p><p>Church, Chase and Betterly appeared at Tuesday&rsquo;s hearing in tan jail uniforms but did not speak. Judge Adam D. Bourgeois Jr. granted a request by prosecutors to continue the case until June 12.</p><p>At least two other anti-NATO protesters arrested last week face serious felony charges. Sebastian Senakiewicz, 24, of Chicago is charged with falsely making a terrorist threat. Mark Neiweem, 28, of Chicago is charged with solicitation for explosives or incendiary devices. A judge on Sunday set their bonds at $750,000 and $500,000, respectively.</p><p>Senakiewicz and Neiweem are scheduled for a status hearing Wednesday.</p></p> Tue, 22 May 2012 15:47:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/nato-terrorism-defendants-kept-%E2%80%98observation%E2%80%99-cells-99442 Steep bond for NATO protesters held on bomb charges http://www.wbez.org/news/steep-bond-nato-protesters-held-bomb-charges-99354 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Gelsomino1cropscale.jpg" style="margin: 4px 0px 0px 0px; float: left; width: 177px; height: 230px;" title="Defense attorney Sarah Gelsomino on Sunday afternoon calls the amounts ‘punitive.’ (WBEZ/Chip Mitchell)" /></div><p>A Cook County judge set steep bonds Sunday afternoon for two more activists accused of planning violence during the NATO summit.</p><p>Criminal Court Judge Israel Desierto set a $750,000 bond for Sebastian Senakiewicz, 24, a Chicago resident charged with falsely making a terrorist threat. Desierto set a $500,000 bond for Mark Neiweem, 28, a Chicago resident charged with solicitation for explosives or incendiary devices.</p><p>&ldquo;These bonds are extremely high and punitively so, as a result of the sensationalized and politicized allegations that the state&rsquo;s attorneys raised today,&rdquo; said Sarah Gelsomino, an attorney representing the defendants.</p><p>Jack Blakey, head of special prosecutions for the Cook County State&rsquo;s Attorney&rsquo;s Office, declined to comment about the bond hearing after reading a prepared statement about the charges.</p><p>Blakey said Senakiewicz identified himself as an anarchist and part of the Black Bloc movement and claimed several times he had bombs. At one point, Senakiewicz said he had &ldquo;two homemade explosives that could blow up half of an overpass for a train and that he was holding off on using them until NATO,&rdquo; Blakey said. Prosecutors said a search of Senakiewicz&rsquo;s home did not turn up any explosives.</p><p>Blakey said Neiweem told an associate about a store where materials to make a pipe bomb could be purchased, then &ldquo;pressed a piece of paper into the palm of the associate&rsquo;s hand and stated that, if the associate obtained the items and brought them to his house, then they could create a bomb.&rdquo;</p><p>On Saturday, Cook County Judge Edward S. Harmening set $1.5 million bonds for three other activists, all charged with terrorism conspiracy, possession of explosives or incendiary devices and providing material support for terrorism. Authorities accused the trio of possessing Molotov cocktails and planning or proposing attacks on President Barack Obama&rsquo;s campaign headquarters, Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s home, four police stations and financial institutions downtown.</p><p>Prosecutors called those three defendants &ldquo;self-proclaimed anarchists&rdquo; and listed them as Jared Chase, 27, of Keene, New Hampshire; Brian Church, 22, of Fort Lauderdale, Florida; and Brent Betterly, 24, of Massachusetts.</p><p>Chase, Church and Betterly were among nine people arrested during a Wednesday night police raid in the Bridgeport neighborhood. The raid targeted the apartment of some leaders of Occupy Chicago, a group leading protests against the summit. Senakiewicz and Neiweem were arrested Thursday at other locations.</p><p>Prosecutors said all five cases stem from the same investigation.</p><p>Defense attorneys said authorities built all the cases using an informant duo &mdash; a man who went by the name &ldquo;Mo&rdquo; and a woman who went by &ldquo;Gloves.&rdquo; The attorneys said that the duo tried to manufacture crimes.</p><p>Defense attorneys also claim that authorities targeted the activists for their political beliefs.</p><p>Court filings by prosecutors state that most of the defendants self-identify as anarchists. State&rsquo;s Attorney Anita Alvarez, questioned Saturday about the relevance to the criminal case, answered that &ldquo;some of the techniques that they were exhibiting all go in line with their beliefs.&rdquo;</p><p>Another possible issue is the length of time authorities held the defendants before allowing them to go before a judge. The bond hearing for Senakiewicz and Neiweem did not occur until almost three full days after their arrests. Their attorneys say neither defendant had an earlier opportunity to see a judge.</p><p>Leonard Cavise, a DePaul University law professor, points to a 1991 judicial ruling. &ldquo;The United States Supreme Court has said that the police have an obligation to get the defendant in front of a judge as soon as practically possible but not longer than 48 hours,&rdquo; Cavise says. &ldquo;The reason we have this 48-hour rule is because we want to get the person away from the police as soon as possible before they coerce a confession out of them.&rdquo;</p><p>Violating that rule, Cavise adds, could lead a judge to throw out any confession from trial.</p><p>Sally Daly, a spokeswoman for the state&rsquo;s attorney, insisted that Senakiewicz and Neiweem were held according to the law.</p></p> Sun, 20 May 2012 16:53:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/steep-bond-nato-protesters-held-bomb-charges-99354