WBEZ | Catholicism http://www.wbez.org/tags/catholicism Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en 'Media nuns' assist Catholics in staying connected in a digital age http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/media-nuns-assist-catholics-staying-connected-digital-age-106328 <p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: left;"><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: left;"><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/star%20wars_1.jpg" style="height: 229px; width: 305px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 1px; float: left;" title="Sister Helena comes face-to-face with Darth Vader on Hollywood Blvd. Sister Helena writes movie reviews for Catholic New World. (Courtesy of Sister Helena Burns)" />The sanctuary inside St. Mary Catholic Church in the village of Huntley echoed with the voices of more than 200 high school freshmen. They fidgeted as they waited for confirmation class to begin.</div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">A poster for the movie <em>Warm Bodies</em> appeared on a large screen behind Sister Helena Burns. She asked the students if any of them have seen it, and some raise their hands.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&ldquo;What happens when the two fall in love?&quot; she asked. &quot;The zombie guy and the human girl, what happens?&quot;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">And yes, she was talking about a zombie movie.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&ldquo;He starts to come back to life, right? His little heart starts beating. What else happens? Does it just stay between the two of them? It&rsquo;s just their love, and it&rsquo;s all closed off and private?&quot; Sister Helena asked.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Hands began to pop up around the room, and one student shouted out the answer Sister Helena wanted.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&quot;Yes, the love spreads,&quot; Sister Helena said to the students. &quot;Two thumbs up! Wasn&rsquo;t it great?&rdquo;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">The self-dubbed &#39;media nun&#39; is teaching a class about theology of the body, the idea that the human body is a revelation of God.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Using popular movies as a way to communicate to teens is just one example of Sister Helena&#39;s media savvy. She also tweets, blogs, <a href="http://www.hellburns.blogspot.com/2013/03/brand-new-my-video-review-of-warm-bodies.html#.UVOBRjevlI4">writes movie reviews</a><em> </em>and is making a documentary film about her order&#39;s founder with Spirit Juice Studios.<br /><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em>To get a sense of Sister Helena&#39;s social media presence, check out this sampling from Storify:&nbsp; </em><a href="http://sfy.co/gH2R">Sister Helena Burns, &#39;Media Nun&#39;</a></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">She&rsquo;s part of an international order of nuns called the Daughters of St. Paul. They claim they&rsquo;re the only order in the world whose sole mission is using media to &ldquo;communicate the gospel in a digital age.&rdquo; And at a time when studies show more and more people are feeling disconnected from institutional churches, the sisters may have found an unusual way to reach out.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">The order was founded by Father James Alberione in 1915. He had a vision media would explode in the 20th century, and he should spread the gospel to as many people as possible using whatever technologies were available.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Back in those days, that was mostly newspapers and passing out pamphlets door-to-door. In 1932, the order opened the Pauline bookstores, which have locations across the country, including Chicago.</div></div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/choir_0.jpg" style="height: 211px; width: 310px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 1px; float: right;" title="The Daughters of St. Paul Choir singing at a Christmas concert in Boston. The order has its own state of the art sound studio for recording and producing albums. (Courtesy of Sister Helena Burns)" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">Over the years, the stores have adopted new forms of media and technology as they&#39;ve come along.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Today, they&#39;re known as Pauline Books and Media.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">They&#39;ve expanded their technologies to include ebooks, smartphone apps and software, among others. Music from the Daughters of St. Paul choir can be found on YouTube and in iTunes.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">The Chicago order of the Daughters of St. Paul is located over its Pauline Books and Media store on North Michigan Avenue in the Loop.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Dressed in her navy blue veil and smock, Sister Helena greeted me warmly when I dropped by the store. It was early, so there weren&#39;t any customers browsing the religious books or trying to track down communion gifts yet. Sister Helena led me to the back of the store, where we took an elevator upstairs to the convent. The furnishings in the florescent-lit kitchen were spartan but comfortable.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Sister Helena entered the Daughters of St. Paul at 17, after finding an ad in <em>Catholic Digest.</em> The order&#39;s mission of spreading the gospel through media spoke to her immediately.</div><p>&ldquo;I felt, what better way could you bring God into somebody&rsquo;s heart and soul and mind, just directly through a book, a song, a magazine, a film,&rdquo; she said.&nbsp;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/MEDIA LITERACY WORKSHOP 2.jpg" style="height: 225px; width: 300px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 1px; float: left;" title="Sister Helena giving a talk on media literacy. The Daughters of St. Paul do various forms of outreach to teach others about using media responsibly. (Courtesy of Sister Helena Burns)" /></div><p>Sister Helena didn&rsquo;t always know she was going to be a nun. Growing up, she dreamt of working with animals, especially birds. But she also loved reading and writing short stories</p><p>&ldquo;I could see the influence for the good and the ill that media had on me, on my friends, and on society,&quot; she said. &quot;I thought, &lsquo;Wow, I would love to just get in there and affirm the good, and try to help people also reflect on their everyday media experiences.&#39;&quot;</p><div class="image-insert-image ">The Daughters of St. Paul don&rsquo;t just evangelize, they teach people to use media responsibly without allowing it to take over their lives. In addition to speaking to large groups like the confirmation class at St. Mary&#39;s, they also offer private sessions with families and individuals, or anyone who needs help balancing the media and technology.</div><p>Sister Helena told me about a woman whose granddaughter used to come over every day after school.</p><div class="image-insert-image ">&quot;&#39;Because,&#39; she said,&nbsp; &#39;Grandma, you look at me. I go to my house, my little brother&rsquo;s playing with his games, my mother&rsquo;s talking on her phone, my dad&rsquo;s at the computer.&#39; She said, &lsquo;I come into your house, Grandma, and you&rsquo;re at the computer, you shut it off.&#39;&rdquo;</div><p>In addition to working with teens and families, the order also uses media as a tool to recruit new sisters. A 2012 study from Georgetown University shows the number of nuns in the United States has dropped by two-thirds since the 1960s.</p><p>The Daughters of St. Paul hope to reverse that trend by reaching out to young women in their own language, social media.</p><p>That appealed to 30-year-old Danielle Lussier, who&rsquo;s entering the order this September. Like Sister Helena, Danielle never pictured herself as a nun.</p><p>&ldquo;They were other worldly, they were outside of my own worldview, totally, like, out of touch maybe? But also mysterious,&quot; she said.</p><p>Danielle studied photography and film in college, but she began to wonder if she was using her talents for the highest possible purpose. While on a religious retreat, she found her purpose in the Daughters of St. Paul.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/italy_0.jpg" style="float: right; height: 212px; width: 305px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 1px;" title="Sister Helena filming a scene on location in Italy. She's working with Spirit Juice Studios of Chicago on a film about Father James Alberione, who founded the Daughters of St. Paul. (Courtesy of Sister Helena Burns)" /></div><p>&ldquo;This is a means of reaching people where they are,&quot; Danielle said. &quot;This is the language of our culture.&rdquo;</p><p>Back at St. Mary Catholic Church, the nuns seem to be getting through. Fifteen-year-old Bailey said she&#39;s heard some &quot;boring&quot; speakers in confirmation class, but hearing a nun speak about a zombie movie caught her attention.</p><p>&ldquo;She&rsquo;s not just [living] this strict life, she can get out there and teach kids [in the way] we learn,&quot; Bailey said. &quot;It&rsquo;s kind of more our generation,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>Now, Bailey said, she expects to pay more attention to Catholic issues when they pop up on Facebook.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 28 Mar 2013 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/media-nuns-assist-catholics-staying-connected-digital-age-106328 Dennis O'Toole explains how it works to be a practicing Catholic in 2012 http://www.wbez.org/blog/onstagebackstage/2012-01-19/dennis-otoole-explains-how-it-works-be-practicing-catholic-2012-956 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/photo/2012-January/2012-01-19/4341223.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2012-January/2012-01-19/4341223.jpg" style="margin-right: 10px; margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 10px; float: left; width: 300px; height: 260px; " title="">Writer, performer and comedian Dennis O'Toole&nbsp;takes on the religion beat, and explains how on earth he can be a practicing, progressive Catholic in 2012. Read an excerpt, or listen below.</p><p><em>"Imaginary people ask me all the time: 'Dennis, what's it like being a practicing Catholic in 2012?' Well, I say, you know when you're at your sister's wedding and you get into a fist fight with the DJ because the guy doesn't have any Blue Oyster Cult? Then your brand-new brother-in-law tries to intervene. So your dad kicks him in the nuts, and then pukes on him? It kind of feels like that."</em></p><p><audio class="mejs mediaelement-formatter-identified-1332483854-1" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/sites/default/files/dennis o'toole.mp3">&nbsp;</audio></p><p>This Saturday at the Horseshoe, you'll see Steve Waltien of the Second City main stage, Kate James of Schadenfraude, puppeteer Noah Ginex, and a tribute to the late Chicago comic Mike Enriquez by Ryan Patrick Dolan.</p><p><a href="http://thepapermacheteshow.com/" target="_blank">The Paper Machete</a>&nbsp;<em>is a weekly live magazine at the Horseshoe in North Center. It's always at 3 p.m., it's always on Saturday, and it's always free. Get all your</em>&nbsp;The Paper Machete Radio Magazine&nbsp;<em>needs filled&nbsp;<a href="http://wbez.org/thepapermachete" target="_blank">here</a>, or download the podcast from iTunes&nbsp;<a href="http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/the-paper-machete-radio-magazine/id450280345" target="_blank">here</a>.</em></p></p> Thu, 19 Jan 2012 19:30:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blog/onstagebackstage/2012-01-19/dennis-otoole-explains-how-it-works-be-practicing-catholic-2012-956 Ukrainian Greek Catholic leader, Sviatoslav Shevchuk, talks spirituality and politics http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-01-17/ukrainian-greek-catholic-leader-sviatoslav-shevchuk-talks-spirituality-a <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2012-January/2012-01-17/shevchuk_mokshytskyj.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The <a href="http://www.ugcc.org.ua/index.php?L=2" target="_blank">Greek Catholic Church in Ukraine</a> has survived turbulent times, including when it was driven underground during Soviet rule. Today, the Church makes its way in a free Ukraine. But that doesn’t mean it operates in a world free from politics.</p><p><em>Worldview</em> talks to the Church’s new leader, Major Archbishop Sviatoslav Shevchuk. Known as Patriarch to his flock, he's only 41 years old. Shevchuk's predecessor willingly retired to turn over leadership to him. Known in the Church as a charismatic leader, the Archbishop gives <em>Worldview</em> a mini-history of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church and its place in Ukraine’s spiritual and political life.</p><p><em><strong>During the original boradcast, it was eronneously stated that Archbishop Sviatoslav Shevchuk is head of the <span class="commentBody" data-jsid="text">Roman Ca<span class="text_exposed_show">tholic Church in Ukraine</span></span>. We regret the error.</strong></em></p></p> Tue, 17 Jan 2012 16:58:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-01-17/ukrainian-greek-catholic-leader-sviatoslav-shevchuk-talks-spirituality-a Cardinal George required to hand in letter of resignation http://www.wbez.org/story/cardinal-george-required-hand-letter-resignation-95555 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2012-January/2012-01-13/RS2444_AP060406015168-cardinal george Charles Rex Arbogast-scr.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Cardinal Francis George turns 75 on Monday, and that means he'll be submitting his mandatory letter of resignation.</p><p>In the Roman Catholic Church, bishops are required to write a letter of resignation when they hit 75. The pope doesn't have to accept it, however, so bishops often stay in office a few more years.</p><p>Cardinal George has said <a href="http://www.catholicnewworld.com/cnwonline/2011/0327/7.aspx">he doesn't want to retire yet</a>. He's survived cancer, and says he feels good about his health.</p><p>Cardinals can serve as electors of the pope until they’re 80.</p><p>“We have never experienced this problem in Chicago, since all my predecessors died before they were 75,” Cardinal George said in a statement. “I am eager to be the first Archbishop of Chicago to retire!”</p><p>The cardinal's known as a conservative bishop who's spoken out against gay marriage and the ordination of women.</p><p>George gained national prominence as president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, a post he held from 2007 to 2010.</p></p> Mon, 16 Jan 2012 11:53:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/cardinal-george-required-hand-letter-resignation-95555 Cardinal blesses ‘healing garden’ for sex-abuse victims http://www.wbez.org/story/cardinal-blesses-%E2%80%98healing-garden%E2%80%99-sex-abuse-victims-87664 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-June/2011-06-09/CardinalGeorge_Healing_Garden.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago’s top Catholic official Thursday blessed what his archdiocese is calling its “healing garden” for survivors of clergy sexual abuse.<br> <br> The garden covers a plot next to Holy Family, a 19th century Chicago church at 1080 West Roosevelt Road, and includes more than two dozen varieties of trees, plants and flowers as well as a 600-pound bronze sculpture of a man, woman and child holding hands, dancing in a circle and smiling. An archdiocese committee that includes four abuse survivors started planning the project more than two years ago.<br> <br> At a prayer service before giving his blessing, Cardinal Francis George said the garden shows “a permanent voice of victims, a permanent apology on the part of the church, and a permanent commitment by the ministers of the church . . . that we are there” for victims who seek help.<br> <br> “We hope,” George added, “that, in the midst of this tragedy, there will be the possibility of new life, of resurrection of the heart in such a way that one can continue with new energy and new vigor and to be not trapped in something that brings death but, rather, find new life — with the help of others and the help of God — that will be, itself, a light to the world.”<br> <br> But the garden isn’t impressing some victims of Catholic clerical abuse.<br> <br> “Cardinal George and other church officials have empowered and enabled sexual predators to abuse more children,” said Barbara Blaine, president of the Chicago-based Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests. “Instead of being punished for those reckless actions, many have been promoted.”<br> <br> Blaine says many church officials ought to face criminal investigation.</p></p> Thu, 09 Jun 2011 21:25:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/cardinal-blesses-%E2%80%98healing-garden%E2%80%99-sex-abuse-victims-87664 Sex abuse lurks behind Catholic election http://www.wbez.org/story/undefined/sex-abuse-lurks-behind-catholic-election <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2010-November/2010-11-04/Bishop_Kicanas_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><em>This story was updated with a clarification on Nov. 12, 2010.</em> *<br /><br /><strong>The nation&rsquo;s Catholic bishops will choose a new leader next month. Both their outgoing president and the bishop likely to take his place have strong ties to the Chicago</strong><strong> archdiocese</strong><strong>. That&rsquo;s not all they have in common. Both clerics advanced the career of a priest who molested as many as 23 boys.&nbsp;They did so even though top archdiocese officials had received allegations about misconduct by the priest. If the election goes as expected, it&rsquo;ll provide ammunition to people who argue there&rsquo;s no accountability for bishops who protect abusers. We report from our West Side bureau.</strong><br /><br />Daniel McCormack went to prison in 2007 for abusing boys when he was pastor of St. Agatha&rsquo;s, a parish in Chicago&rsquo;s North Lawndale neighborhood.<br /><br />To learn more about McCormack, I sit down with a father whose son attended the Catholic school next to the parish. I&rsquo;m keeping the man&rsquo;s name to myself to protect his son&rsquo;s identity.<br /><br />The father says his boy started acting out around age 11 after joining a basketball team McCormack coached. &ldquo;You would try to get to the bottom of it but there was no real way to figure out what was going on,&rdquo; he says.<br /><br />The father didn&rsquo;t find out what was going on until recently. His son&rsquo;s now 20. &ldquo;He was, like, &lsquo;Dad, there&rsquo;s something I want to talk to you about,&rsquo; &rdquo; he says.<br /><br />McCormack was fondling the boy at basketball practice, the father says.<br /><br />The abuse didn&rsquo;t stop there. &ldquo;He would have the children doing tasks around the building,&rdquo; the father says. &ldquo;He&rsquo;d pay them.&rdquo;<br /><br />&ldquo;There was one incident specifically,&rdquo; the father continues. &ldquo;It had started raining. My son was out in the yard, doing some yard work. He had gotten muddy. After getting done with what he was told to do, out in the yard, he went inside. Dan told my son to get out of the clothes: &lsquo;Go and take a shower.&rsquo; As my son was getting out of the shower, he would bend him over. He inserted his penis in my son. And this happened more than once.&rdquo;<br /><br />The man says McCormack abused his son for more than three years.<br /><br />The family has now hired an attorney to see if the Chicago archdiocese will agree to a settlement. &ldquo;I feel really betrayed,&rdquo; the father says. &ldquo;We entrusted these people with our child.&rdquo;<br /><br />I asked the father if he had ever heard of Gerald Kicanas, now a bishop of Tuscon, Arizona. Kicanas helped get McCormack&rsquo;s career off the ground in the early 1990s. Kicanas was rector of an archdiocese seminary where McCormack studied.<br /><br />Here&rsquo;s what happened: Kicanas received reports about three McCormack sexual-misconduct cases, one involving a minor. But Kicanas still approved McCormack for ordination.<br /><br />&ldquo;How do you do these things in the name of God?&rdquo; the father asks.<br /><br />I tell him how the Chicago archdiocese assigned McCormack to various parishes. The priest attracted more accusations, but Cardinal Francis George promoted him in 2005 to help oversee other West Side churches.<br /><br />Around that time, Chicago police arrested McCormack on suspicion of child molestation but released him without charges. Cardinal George kept McCormack in his posts even after the archdiocese sexual-abuse review board urged his removal.<br /><br />The North Lawndale father can&rsquo;t believe this. &ldquo;How is it that you&rsquo;re notified that someone in your parish is doing something to children and these people are still getting higher appointments?&rdquo; he asks.<br /><br />It wasn&rsquo;t until McCormack&rsquo;s second arrest&mdash;more than four months after the first&mdash;that George finally yanked him. The delay outraged victim advocates.<br /><br />But George&rsquo;s peers still elected him president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in 2007. And who did the bishops elect as vice president? Kicanas, the man who approved McCormack&rsquo;s ordination in the first place.<br /><br />&ldquo;They&rsquo;ve looked the other way,&rdquo; says Thomas Doyle, a priest and canon lawyer who helped write a 1985 report about clergy sexual abuse. He later split from church leaders, saying they weren&rsquo;t following his recommendations.<br /><br />Doyle says bishops kept handling abusers the way Kicanas and George handled McCormack: &ldquo;They&rsquo;ve maintained secrecy. They&rsquo;ve secretly transferred the priests. So they have aided and abetted the commission of crimes. But there has been no instance where the pope has called any bishop accountable.&rdquo; <br /><br />Now U.S. bishops are getting ready to elect a president to succeed George. If they stick with tradition, they&rsquo;ll elevate the vice president&mdash;Bishop Kicanas, the former rector of the seminary McCormack attended.<br /><br />I left several messages for Kicanas about the election but he didn&rsquo;t get back. I called the Chicago archdiocese to speak with Cardinal George or a spokesperson. His staff referred me to the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. A spokeswoman there said child sexual abuse is not an election issue and that no one else would be commenting.<br /><br />So I called up Jeff Field of the New York-based Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights, a group that often defends how church leaders handle sex-abuse cases. &ldquo;To deny a bishop a promotion because of what some deem as improper&mdash;when what they do is in line with the church&mdash;is wrong,&rdquo; Field says. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s ridiculous.&rdquo;<br /><br />In other words, bishops shouldn&rsquo;t face punishment if they followed church policies.<br /><br />And the church claims it didn&rsquo;t know that predators keep at it. &ldquo;Much of the research on sex abusers really began in the &rsquo;90s,&rdquo; says Jan Slattery, head of Chicago archdiocese programs for victims and child safety. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a relatively new body of research.&rdquo;<br /><br />Slattery says the way church officials dealt with McCormack used to be routine. &ldquo;We were very quick to take the word of lawyers and psychologists,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;At one point in time even criminal systems were not putting men in prison for this. They were getting them treatment. But that&rsquo;s changed.&rdquo; <br /><br />Slattery&rsquo;s right. A church audit found U.S. bishops received fewer clergy sex-abuse accusations in 2009 than in any year since 2004. Most of the alleged incidents happened decades earlier.<br /><br />But that&rsquo;s why McCormack stands out. He was abusing the North Lawndale boys just five years ago. And just three years ago, a newspaper quoted Bishop Kicanas saying he was right to allow McCormack&rsquo;s ordination.<br /><br />I asked Slattery how she likes the idea of bishops electing leaders who advanced McCormack&rsquo;s career. She didn&rsquo;t respond.<br /><br />Is Slattery aware of any discipline for McCormack&rsquo;s supervisors? &ldquo;I&rsquo;m not going to be privileged to that if that happened,&rdquo; she answers.<br /><br />There are people taking a big-picture look at the Catholic sexual-abuse crisis and whether the church should reconsider leadership. &ldquo;Celibacy is part of a complex culture that gives priests a sense of deference and entitlement and elitism that can lead to perverse behavior, apparently,&rdquo; says Thomas Groome, a Boston College theologian.<br /><br />Groome says making bishops accountable would require changing how the church is governed: &ldquo;There are ways available, even within canon law. The canon law of the Catholic Church calls for parish councils, diocesan councils&mdash;priests and lay people having voice and representation. We&rsquo;ve never implemented that.&rdquo;<br /><br />&ldquo;Some of it will be reform and some of it will be renewal,&rdquo; Groome adds. &ldquo;For example, when you go back into the history of the church, you find that the priests of a diocese had a real voice in choosing their bishop. And, if you go back far enough, in certain places even the people had a real voice in choosing their bishop.&rdquo;<br /><br />But, for now, the faithful don&rsquo;t have that voice. And only the bishops can vote in next month&rsquo;s election.<br /><br />So, barring the unforeseen, their next president&mdash;like the one stepping down&mdash;will have ties to the man who abused the North Lawndale boys.<br /><i><br /></i></p><p style="text-align: left;"><em>* An earlier version of this story said Cardinal Francis George advanced Daniel McCormack&rsquo;s career &ldquo;despite receiving allegations&rdquo; about the priest&rsquo;s misconduct. The basis for our account was a 2008 deposition in which the cardinal answered questions under oath about McCormack&rsquo;s 2005 arrest and George&rsquo;s promotion of the priest to head a deanery. In the deposition, George said he learned of the arrest &ldquo;at the end of August&rdquo; of 2005. McCormack&rsquo;s promotion didn't take effect until Sept. 1, 2005.</em></p><p style="text-align: left;"><em>The Chicago archdiocese says George misspoke during that sworn testimony. A church-commissioned report says the cardinal didn&rsquo;t learn of McCormack's arrest until Sept. 2, 2005&mdash;one day after McCormack's start date as dean.</em></p><p style="text-align: left;"><em>The archdiocese says it&rsquo;s significant that George approved the promotion Aug. 29, one day prior to the arrest. &ldquo;I absolutely deny appointing Dan McCormack as dean after learning of the arrest,&rdquo; the cardinal says in a written statement from his spokeswoman.</em></p><p style="text-align: left;"><em>Accordingly, we&rsquo;ve removed these lines: &ldquo;Both clerics advanced the career of a priest who molested as many as 23 boys. They did so despite receiving allegations about his misconduct.&quot;<br /></em></p><p style="text-align: left;"><em>We replaced them with:</em> <em>&quot;Both clerics advanced the career of a priest who molested as many as 23 boys. They did so even though top archdiocese officials had received allegations about misconduct by the priest.</em><em>&rdquo;</em></p><p style="text-align: left;"><em>As our story notes, however, once George learned of McCormack&rsquo;s August 2005 arrest, the cardinal left the priest in his posts, including the deanery position. The cardinal did so even after his sexual-abuse review board urged McCormack&rsquo;s removal in October 2005. McCormack continued abusing boys. Police finally put an end to it in January 2006, when they arrested him a second time.</em></p><p style="text-align: left;"><em>George insists other archdiocese officials failed to inform him about sexual-misconduct allegations against McCormack </em><em>over the years. But </em><em>the cardinal allowed those officials to continue on in their church careers.</em></p></p> Fri, 22 Oct 2010 18:54:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/undefined/sex-abuse-lurks-behind-catholic-election