WBEZ | Metropolitan Planning Council http://www.wbez.org/tags/metropolitan-planning-council Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Chicago’s Union Station will get indoor park and giant blob http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago%E2%80%99s-union-station-will-get-indoor-park-and-giant-blob-108435 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Union Station 130815 AY.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Commuters going to Chicago&rsquo;s Union Station on August 24 will be greeted by <a href="http://www.metroplanning.org/uploads/cms/documents/trainyard_visualplan.pdf">an indoor park</a> and <a href="https://www.metroplanning.org/uploads/cms/documents/blahblahblob_visualplan.pdf">a giant blob</a>.</p><p>The Great Hall will hold an indoor park with an artificial lawn. It will have seats made from recycled newspapers, picnic tables and tetherball. Graham Grilli, an architect at <a href="http://www.spacearchplan.com/">SPACE architects and planners</a>, the team behind the park, says city commuters travel to the suburbs to enjoy outdoor space and he wanted this park to bring the outdoors to them.</p><p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-5c71b554-8441-6b59-47f1-32c2df7bba5d">&ldquo;Union Station is one of those in-between places where you&rsquo;re in a rush the whole day, and you end up in Union Station with nothing to do for a few minutes,&rdquo; Grilli said. &ldquo;People are often using Union Station to go out to the suburbs, where there&rsquo;s a lot more open space, but the reality is they spend almost all their time commuting in a train or working in an office and they almost never get to enjoy it.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Outside Union Station, the plaza will have something that looks like a giant bouncy castle. Architect Katherine Darnstadt worked on the team behind the Blah Blah Blob!, a creation of <a href="http://latentdesign.net/">Latent Design</a> and the <a href="http://www.cudc.kent.edu/">Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative</a>.</p><p>&ldquo;Lots of things will be happening inside the blob,&quot; Darnstadt said. &quot;The blob will be surrounding tables and chairs that are on the plaza so people could walk inside, have a cup of coffee, eat their lunch inside of it.&rdquo;</p><p>The blob will be lined with artificial grass and will house fitness classes. Darnstadt says several organizations in Chicago have contacted her about wanting to host the blob at future events, so residents may still see the blob around the city after it leaves Union Station.The Metropolitan Planning Council, a local nonprofit development group, organized Active Union Station, a competition for designs that would help make it a gathering place instead of just a train station. The council picked these two designs as<a href="http://www.metroplanning.org/news-events/media-release/6760"> the winners</a>, and each team will receive $5,000.</p><p>The organizers were inspired by the <a href="http://www.unionstationdc.com/">Union Station in Washington, DC</a>, which is a tourist destination in itself; and 30th Street Station in Philadelphia, which has an urban space called <a href="http://universitycity.org/the-porch">the Porch</a> for art, group exercise and food trucks, says Marisa Novara, a program director at the Metropolitan Planning Council.&ldquo;There are a lot of people passing through, what we&rsquo;d like to do is give them more of a reason to stay,&rdquo; Novara said.</p><p>Novara also points out the contest &nbsp;to expand Union Station started from <a href="http://www.unionstationmp.com/">an ongoing collaboration</a> between the Metropolitan Planning Council, Amtrak, Metra, the Chicago Department of Transportation and other groups.Both installations will arrive next Saturday and stay till September 2.</p><p><em>Alan Yu is a WBEZ metro desk intern. Follow him <a href="https://twitter.com/Alan_Yu039">@Alan_Yu039</a>.</em></p></p> Thu, 15 Aug 2013 18:07:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago%E2%80%99s-union-station-will-get-indoor-park-and-giant-blob-108435 Quite a trip: Fabulous hidden spaces of Union Station revealed http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-07/quite-trip-fabulous-hidden-spaces-union-station-revealed-108035 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/9249509770_2daacf6c91_z.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 400px;" title="" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">For a while now, the Metropolitan Planning Council has devoted its efforts to improving Union Station &mdash; and for good reason: The 85-year-old complex is the last of the city&#39;s grand old rail stations and the third-busiest passenger station in the country.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">And what a fine building it is, with its elegant limestone exterior and that romantic passenger hall. And what you can&#39;t see is pretty good too, as it turns out. The MPC earlier this year toured the building and photographed what&#39;s behind the train station&#39;s &quot;official access only&quot; doors and locked-out upper floors. The organization shared pictures of the tour&nbsp;<a href="http://www.metroplanning.org/news-events/blog-post/6737?utm_source=feedburner&amp;utm_medium=feed&amp;utm_campaign=Feed%3A+mpc-blog+%28MPC+blog+posts%29">in a feature</a>&nbsp;on its website this week. The images show the old station has some of downtown&#39;s most remarkable hidden spaces.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">For instance, there is the station&#39;s former Women&#39;s Lounge&mdash; closed off from the main hall for years&mdash; in the photo above. Look at the columns, the coffered ceiling and the murals. The space is so large, the fair-sized crowd barely makes a dent in it.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Here&#39;s a vintage wash-up area in one of Union Station&#39;s closed upper floors:</div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/9249573884_3ef9cf2402_c.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 401px;" title="" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">And the view from the roof:</div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/9246770669_016bf54178_h.jpg" style="height: 400px; width: 600px;" title="" /></div></div></div></div><div class="image-insert-image ">Reuse of these spaces is critical to Union Station&#39;s future. As downtown development spreads westward, the station is a hub rather than facility on the edge of the Loop, which opens a ton of possibilties for those now-hidden offices, lounges and rooms. Having those spaces activated with businesses, restaurants, etc., would be good for the building and for the West Loop.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Want to see more? MPC&nbsp;<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/metroplanning/9246715189/in/set-72157634567699498">posted additional photos</a>&nbsp;on its Flickr page.&nbsp;</div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 12 Jul 2013 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-07/quite-trip-fabulous-hidden-spaces-union-station-revealed-108035 MPC Roundtable - Two Anchor Institutions, One Story of Revitalization through Housing Investment http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/mpc-roundtable-two-anchor-institutions-one-story-revitalization-through <p><p>One is an academic institution in the heart of the city of Chicago; the other is a manufacturing company located 40 miles northwest in suburban Carpentersville, Ill., population 38,062. Though it may seem unlikely, University of Chicago and OTTO Engineering have some things in common: Both of these large employers are anchoring community redevelopment by investing in their local housing markets.</p><div>At this MPC Roundtable, University of Chicago&#39;s <strong>Derek Douglas</strong>,&nbsp;Vice President for Civic Engagement; and OTTO Engineering President <strong>Tom Roeser </strong>will compare and contrast how their unique housing reinvestment strategies support the local economy. UofC has offered an employer-assisted housing program for nearly 10 years, providing housing counseling and downpayment assistance to employees who chose to move near campus. Through OTTO Homes, OTTO Engineering buys, rehabs and sells homes in Carpentersville, giving preference and incentives to local employees who want to become homeowners.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/MPC-webstory_5.jpg" title="" /></div></div><div>Recorded live Wednesday, February 27, 2013 at the&nbsp;MPC Conference Center.</div></p> Wed, 27 Feb 2013 11:13:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/mpc-roundtable-two-anchor-institutions-one-story-revitalization-through MPC and ULI Chicago Roundtable - Cook County Land Bank: Returning Vacant Land to Productive Use http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/mpc-and-uli-chicago-roundtable-cook-county-land-bank-returning-vacant-land <p><p>Vacant, abandoned and blighted properties impede Cook County&rsquo;s economic development, weaken the tax base, and impose significant costs to local governments. A countywide land bank is needed to return large swaths of land to productive use and stabilize local communities across Cook County. With approximately 10 percent of housing units in Cook County standing vacant and foreclosure activity up 28 percent in the first half of 2012, Cook County Commissioners and President <strong>Toni Preckwinkle</strong> authorized the creation of a Land Bank Advisory Committee (LBAC). The LBAC, chaired by MPC&rsquo;s <strong>MarySue Barrett</strong>, consisted of civic, financial, legal, and community development professionals charged with examining the challenges, tools and potential for a countywide land bank. The Committee put forth a set of recommendations, captured in the current Cook County Land Bank ordinance, to create a Land Bank Authority as an agency of the County that is governed by an independent Board of Directors. The LBAC was further informed by a detailed report and set of recommendations provided by an Urban Land Institute Chicago (ULI Chicago) Technical Assistance Panel.</p><div>Chaired by <strong>Scott Goldstein </strong>of Teska Associates, Inc., the panel brought together a diverse set of real estate experts to provide objective industry expertise and pragmatic recommendations for the land bank.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>This roundtable will consider the vision for a countywide land bank and how this innovative tool can be deployed to remove redevelopment barriers and jumpstart economic development. Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle, Cook County Commissioner <strong>Bridget Gainer</strong>, Principal at Teska Associates, Inc.</div><div>Scott Goldstein, and Director of the Thriving Communities Institute <strong>Jim Rokakis</strong> will discuss how the LBAC and ULI Chicago were involved in the creation of the Cook County land bank legislation and how the newly approved Cook County Land Bank Authority compares to similar efforts outside of Illinois.</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F80835010" width="100%"></iframe></p><div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/MPC-webstory_2.jpg" title="" /></div></div><div>Recorded live Thursday, February 7, 2013 at&nbsp;Drinker Biddle &amp; Reath LLP.</div><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Thu, 07 Feb 2013 17:09:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/mpc-and-uli-chicago-roundtable-cook-county-land-bank-returning-vacant-land $7.3 million OKed for downtown ‘bus rapid transit’ http://www.wbez.org/story/story/city-devotes-73-million-downtown-brt-96580 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2012-February/2012-02-21/BRT_Flickr_.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><img alt="Transmilenio" class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2012-February/2012-02-20/Transmilenio.jpg" style="margin: 9px 18px 6px 1px; float: left; width: 374px; height: 247px;" title="Bogotá, Colombia, has the world’s most advanced bus-rapid-transit system. (flickr/Oscar Amaya)" />Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s administration has decided to channel more than $7.3&nbsp;million in tax increment financing toward a &ldquo;bus rapid transit&rdquo; line downtown, according to transportation and economic-development officials.</p><p>The money will combine with an announced $24.6&nbsp;million from the Federal Transit Administration to speed up trips between Union Station, the Ogilvie Transportation Center, several Chicago Transit Authority lines, Streeterville and Navy Pier.</p><p>&ldquo;About 50&nbsp;percent of the commuters who come to work every day in Chicago&rsquo;s central business district arrive by bus or train,&rdquo; said Peter Skosey, vice president of the Metropolitan Planning Council, a nonprofit group working on the project. &ldquo;If they&rsquo;re getting off at those Metra stations in the West Loop, it&rsquo;s quite a hike over to North Michigan Avenue or even just to State Street. So this really facilitates the use of transit for downtown Chicago.&rdquo;</p><p>Bus rapid transit, known as BRT, delivers many benefits of rail at a fraction of the cost. The most advanced BRT systems have sprung up in Bogotá, Colombia; Guangzhou, China; Johannesburg, South Africa; and Ahmedabad, India.</p><p>BRT remains largely unknown in the United States. Modest systems are running in Cleveland, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, Las Vegas and Eugene, Oregon.</p><p>In 2008, Mayor Richard M. Daley&rsquo;s administration said it was moving on a BRT pilot project. But the city bungled an application for $153&nbsp;million in federal funding for it.</p><p>Emanuel&rsquo;s mayoral transition plan last year promised a &ldquo;full bus rapid transit pilot&rdquo; within three years. The pilot, according to the plan, will include &ldquo;dedicated bus lanes, signal preemption, prepaid boarding or on-board fare verification, multiple entry and exits points on the buses, limited stops, and street-level boarding.&rdquo;</p><p>The Chicago Department of Transportation is keeping lips tight about its design of the downtown line, known as both the &ldquo;East-West Transit Corridor&rdquo; and &ldquo;Central Loop BRT.&rdquo; It&rsquo;s not clear the design will include many of the timesavers listed in Emanuel&rsquo;s plan. A CDOT plan announced in 2010 would remove cars from some traffic lanes, rig key stoplights to favor the buses, improve sidewalks, install bicycle lanes and build specially branded bus stops equipped with GPS-powered &ldquo;next bus&rdquo; arrival signs.</p><p>The CTA, meanwhile, has a separate $1.6&nbsp;million federal grant to plan BRT options along a 21-mile stretch of Western Avenue. Another $11&nbsp;million from the feds is funding bus improvements this year along the South Side&rsquo;s Jeffrey Boulevard. That line, though billed as BRT, will lack many features for speeding up trips.</p></p> Tue, 21 Feb 2012 11:56:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/story/city-devotes-73-million-downtown-brt-96580 How Emanuel is selling his monster water fee hike http://www.wbez.org/content/how-emanuel-selling-his-monster-water-fee-hike <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-November/2011-11-07/IMG_0850.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>The way it sits along Lake Michigan, you'd think Chicago would have a few problems bigger than water. But getting that water to homes and businesses takes a massive underground network - one that's crumbling, according to Mayor Rahm Emanuel.</p><p>To speed up replacement of old water and sewer lines, he's asking for a huge increase in water fees. As part of our coverage this week of Emanuel's budget, we looked closer at the water proposal, and how the mayor is selling it.</p><p>There are tens of millions of dollars of tax, fine and fee increases in Emanuel's proposed budget. None are likely to affect the average Chicagoan as much as the water fee hike, beginning with a 25 percent boost next year.</p><p>"The extra cost will equal about five cups of coffee at Dunkin' Donuts a month," Emanuel said during his budget address to the City Council on Oct. 12.</p><p>"I don't drink coffee, so I'm still trying to do the math," said Ald. Joe Moore of the North Side's 49th Ward.</p><p>Well, Moore can put down his calculator. The administration claims the water and sewer fee increase adds up to - on average - $120 per year. Although, the cups of coffee keep multiplying after that.</p><p>By 2015, Chicago households - and suburban ones who also get their water from the city - would pay more than double what they do now. Also, many nonprofits and churches that currently get a pass on water bills would gradually have to start paying.</p><p>All that would help finance a $4 billion dollar-plus plan that is expected to nearly triple the current speed of infrastructure replacement.</p><p>"We have about a thousand miles of water pipe that are 100 years old or older," Emanuel said. "Despite our budget problems, we cannot delay their replacement any longer."</p><p>Plus, Emanuel announced, the work will mean 1,800 jobs a year over the next decade, not an insignificant selling point at a time of high unemployment.</p><p>Two days later, the mayor scheduled a press conference to make the pitch again. And, one day after that...</p><p>"The pipe broke at 8:30 Saturday morning," explained Tom Powers, Emanuel's water commissioner, at a press conference at <a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=47th+and+loomis+chicago&amp;ll=41.808701,-87.660105&amp;spn=0.007805,0.025814&amp;oe=utf-8&amp;client=firefox-a&amp;hnear=W+47th+St+%26+S+Loomis+Blvd,+Chicago,+Cook,+Illinois+60609&amp;gl=us&amp;t=m&amp;z=16&amp;vpsrc=0">47th and Loomis</a>. That's where a more than 80-year-old 24-inch water main broke. "We lost about 1.7 million gallons of water through this break alone."</p><p>The timing was perfect: a ready-made TV event, flooded neighborhood and all, to demonstrate the need for the water fee increase. There have been about 250 water main breaks this year in Chicago, but this one got a lot of attention, no doubt because the city called attention to it.</p><p>"Coincidental, or foresight on the mayor's part?" said Ald. Willie Cochran, when asked about the timing.</p><p>Part of Cochran's 20th Ward was affected by the water main break. I asked him if the neighborhood flooding makes the increase an easier sell to his ward's residents.</p><p>"It's not an easy pill to swallow when you start talking about increasing fees at this time, as it ...was in the past," Cochran said. "It wasn't done in the past."</p><p>Actually, it was done in the past. From <a href="http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/water/provdrs/cust_serv/svcs/know_my_water_sewerrates.html">2007 to 2010</a>, water rates jumped about 50 percent. Emanuel's proposal would raise combined water and sewer rates more than 100 percent more over the next four years. Hikes after that would be pegged to inflation, every year.</p><p>If residents sign up for a free city-installed water meter, the mayor claims, the increases can be blunted. Though Emanuel is quick to point out that Chicago residents "currently pay the lowest price for water of any big city in America."</p><p>In fact, Memphis has <a href="http://www.bv.com/Downloads/Resources/Brochures/rsrc_EMS_Top50RateSurvey.pdf">lower water rates</a>. (Emanuel just doesn't count Memphis as a big city.) But the point is the same: Chicago's water is cheap.</p><p>"For years - decades, the water sold by the city of Chicago has been under-priced," said Josh Ellis, a water expert with the Metropolitan Planning Council.</p><p>Ellis said the fee increase would make Chicago residents value their water more, leading to more conservation. Ellis supports it, with a hitch.</p><p>"I would like to see the city of Chicago create some sort of reporting system, whether it's on the bills or on the website or wherever, that says, 'Here's how many miles of pipe we replaced in January, here's how many we replaced in February, here's how many we replaced in March.' So that we know how much is getting fixed, and we know that there's been a benefit," Ellis said.</p><p>Even if the city doesn't put that information on water bills, Ellis notes Chicagoans would see the work happening, torn-up street after torn-up street.</p><p>"If we're going to replace 900 miles of century-old water pipes, they're definitely going to notice all of the repair projects," Ellis said. "Will they have a fundamentally different experience when they turn on the tap to get a drink of water or take a bath or something, no. I mean the water's going to look the same, it's going to taste the same, it's going to be the same water."</p><p>But it would be delivered with more reliability, less waste, and - at least relative to today - a much higher price tag.</p></p> Tue, 08 Nov 2011 06:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/content/how-emanuel-selling-his-monster-water-fee-hike Rahm vows bus rapid transit, but can he deliver? http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-23/rahm-promises-brt-can-he-deliver-90926 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-August/2011-08-23/Transmilenio.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>All this week, WBEZ is looking at <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/first-100-rahm-emanuels-first-100-days-chicago-mayor" target="_blank">Rahm Emanuel’s first 100 days as Chicago mayor</a>.</p><p>One of Emanuel’s pledges is to push for the creation of the city’s first bus-rapid-transit line. The idea behind BRT is to deliver the benefits of rail at a fraction of the cost. BRT shortens travel times through dedicated bus lanes, pre-paid boarding that’s level with station platforms, and traffic signals that favor the buses.</p><p>WBEZ’s West Side bureau reporter <a href="http://www.wbez.org/staff/chip-mitchell" target="_blank">Chip Mitchell</a> gives us a progress report on Emanuel’s ambitious plan.<br> &nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 23 Aug 2011 16:49:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-23/rahm-promises-brt-can-he-deliver-90926 Summit aims to revive Gary's economy http://www.wbez.org/story/gary/getting-grip-gary <p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman">The second-in-command at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development visited <st1:place w:st="on"><st1:city w:st="on">Gary</st1:city>, <st1:state w:st="on">Ind.</st1:state></st1:place>, Wednesday to kick off an effort to renew the long-struggling industri<st1:personname w:st="on">al</st1:personname> city. </font></font></font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman"><o:p></o:p></font></font></font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman">Ron Sims, Deputy Secretary at HUD, said <st1:city w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Gary</st1:place></st1:city> has <st1:personname w:st="on">al</st1:personname>l the ingredients to turn its fortunes around but needs a plan to use those ingredients--and stick to it. </font></font></font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman"><o:p></o:p></font></font></font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman">&ldquo;You have a passenger rail system here. You have a lakefront here. You have a university here,&rdquo; Sims said. &ldquo;But you have to know where you&rsquo;re going. You just can&rsquo;t move from one good idea to another idea. You have to have discipline and execute it.&rdquo;</font></font></font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman"><o:p></o:p></font></font></font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman">Sims was among sever<st1:personname w:st="on">al</st1:personname> feder<st1:personname w:st="on">al</st1:personname>, state and loc<st1:personname w:st="on">al</st1:personname> offici<st1:personname w:st="on">al</st1:personname>s who gathered at the <st1:placename w:st="on">Genesis</st1:placename> <st1:placetype w:st="on">Center</st1:placetype> in downtown <st1:city w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Gary</st1:place></st1:city> for the launch of GRIP, short for Gary &amp; Region Investment Project. The project is a one-of-a-kind urban planning effort coordinated by the Times of Northwest Indiana and the Metropolitan Planning Council of Chicago. <o:p></o:p></font></font></font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman">&ldquo;This is an initiative about <st1:city w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Gary</st1:place></st1:city> as the center. We can&rsquo;t succeed unless <st1:city w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Gary</st1:place></st1:city> succeeds. But <st1:place w:st="on"><st1:city w:st="on">Gary</st1:city></st1:place> can&rsquo;t succeed on its own. So this interdependency is an approach that we have found works in every part of metropolitan <st1:city w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Chicago</st1:place></st1:city>,&rdquo; said MarySue Barrett, president of the MPC. </font></font></font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman"><o:p></o:p></font></font></font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman">Barrett said the MPC has led programs in and around <st1:place w:st="on">Northwest Indiana</st1:place>, but never on the sc<st1:personname w:st="on">al</st1:personname>e of GRIP. The go<st1:personname w:st="on">al</st1:personname> is to tap into resources in Gary and its neighboring communities to bring change.</font></font></font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman"><o:p></o:p></font></font></font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman">&ldquo;We get that our workforce is shared. Our land, water and air is <st1:personname w:st="on">al</st1:personname>l shared. And when they are <st1:personname w:st="on">al</st1:personname>l not functioning, we <st1:personname w:st="on">al</st1:personname>l pay a price,&rdquo; Barrett said. &ldquo;If <st1:place w:st="on">Northwest Indiana</st1:place> is not successful, Chicagoland as a whole cannot be successful. It&rsquo;s that simple.&rdquo; </font></font></font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman"><o:p></o:p></font></font></font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman">Gary Mayor Rudy Clay said something like GRIP has been needed for a long time.<span style="">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></font></font></font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman"><span style=""> </span>&ldquo;We&rsquo;ve been t<st1:personname w:st="on">al</st1:personname>king about people coming together, not only in <st1:place w:st="on"><st1:placetype w:st="on">Lake</st1:placetype> <st1:placetype w:st="on">County</st1:placetype></st1:place>, but the region, coming together and making this region one of the greatest in the nation,&rdquo; Clay said. <o:p></o:p></font></font></font></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 28 Oct 2010 03:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/gary/getting-grip-gary