WBEZ | Dinaw Mengestu http://www.wbez.org/tags/dinaw-mengestu Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Afternoon Shift Book Club: ‘All Our Names’ http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-28/afternoon-shift-book-club-%E2%80%98all-our-names%E2%80%99-112106 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/All%20Our%20Names%20cover.jpg" style="height: 956px; width: 620px;" title="" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207718101&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Afternoon Shift Book Club: &#39;All Our Names&#39;</span><br /><span id="docs-internal-guid-cd218569-9cb3-f7cd-143a-ba491206ee2f">Love, war and loneliness are three of the threads that run throughout our Afternoon Shift Book Club selection for May. We always pick books that involve Chicago or are by Chicagoans. Our May selection, &ldquo;All Our Names,&rdquo; &nbsp;is really more of a story about the Midwest. &nbsp;The book centers around two young men in Kampala and the story of how one of them, Isaac, emigrates to the Midwest in the 1970s. Isaac&rsquo;s past of violence and looming civil war in Uganda are interspersed with his present relationship with his social worker, Helen, in the small town he has been relocated to. It&rsquo;s the third novel by Ethiopian born, Peoria-raised author Dinaw Mengestu who joins us from New York. </span><br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/dinawmengestu">Dinaw Mengestu</a> is a writer, novelist and author of &lsquo;All Our Names.&rsquo;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207718106&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">How books become musicals</span><br style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;" /><span id="docs-internal-guid-cd218569-9cb5-1f65-1cba-1621fb9015b1"><em>Phantom of the Opera</em>, <em>Les Mis</em>, <em>Wicked</em>, even <em>Cats</em>! What do of all these well-known musicals have in common? They&#39;re all based on books. We all know what it&#39;s like when one of our favorite books is turned into a movie but translating the page into a musical presents a special set of challenges. WBEZ&rsquo;s </span>General Admission co-hosts Tyler Greene and Don Hall join us along with Doug Peck, Music Director of the <em>Secret Garden</em> which runs at the Court Theatre through June 21.<br /><br /><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-cd218569-9cb5-1f65-1cba-1621fb9015b1"><a href="https://twitter.com/storyproducer?lang=en">Tyler Greene</a></span> is a co-host of WBEZ&rsquo;s General Admissions.</em></li><li><em><a href="https://twitter.com/dray4255?lang=en">Don hall</a> is a co-host of WBEZ&rsquo;s General Admissions.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-cd218569-9cb5-1f65-1cba-1621fb9015b1"><a href="https://twitter.com/douglaspeck?lang=en">Doug Peck</a></span> is Musical Director of the Secret Garden.</em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207719603&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Stalled CTA development impacts property owners in Lakeview</span><br /><span id="docs-internal-guid-cd218569-9cb7-6c90-5e17-7e756d6e2875">The Chicago Transit Authority has been kicking around development plans for a new Brown line flyover north of the Belmont stop in Lakeview for nearly a year. CTA says the new track would speed up travel times for Red and Purple line commuters and reduce overcrowding on trains. Property owners in the area say the longer the city continues to stall, the more the uncertainty of the situation is costing them. </span>Crain&rsquo;s Chicago Business reporter Dennis Rodkin has been following the story and joins us with details.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-cd218569-9cb7-6c90-5e17-7e756d6e2875">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/Dennis_Rodkin">Dennis Rodkin</a> is a Crain&rsquo;s Chicago Business reporter.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207719798&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Chicago youth organize rally for climate change</span><br />Chicago Public School students from all over the city organized Thursday at the Thompson Center to send a message to Illinois lawmakers about climate change. But before the rally kicked off, we spoke to two youth activists: Eve Robinson is a student at Whitney Young, and Maria Sanchez is from Northside College Prep.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-cd218569-9cb8-89ba-2109-7049f93e7491"><a href="https://twitter.com/newyears__eve">Eve Robinson</a></span> is a Whitney Young student.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-cd218569-9cb8-89ba-2109-7049f93e7491"><a href="https://twitter.com/maria_esan98">Maria Sanchez</a></span> is a Northside College Prep student.</em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207719932&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Bulls fire coach Thibs, Blackhawks stay alive</span><br />The drama is over for now former-Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau. The Bulls announced the firing of Coach Thibs on Thursday. The Blackhawks won big Wednesday night forcing the Western Conference championship series to a game 7 on Saturday in Anaheim. WBEZ sports contributor Cheryl Raye-Stout joins us with the latest.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/Crayestout">Cheryl Raye-Stout</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s sports contributor.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207720386&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Tech Shift: Summer STEM resources for Chicago&#39;s kids</span><br /><span id="docs-internal-guid-cd218569-9cbb-6f51-db79-a71971df1fcd">All week on Tech Shift we&rsquo;re talking about opportunities for kids to boost their &nbsp;STEM skills over the summer. WBEZ digital producer and co-host of the </span>Nerdette podcast, Tricia Bobeda, joins us in studio with some science, engineering, technology and math resources Chicago once school lets out.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr"><br /><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/triciabobeda?lang=en">Tricia Bobeda</a> is a WBEZ digital producer and co-host of the Nerdette podcast.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207720043&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Proposal to help curb heroin overdoses moves to Illinois Senate</span><br />On May 27, the House took a break from budget negotiations for a few minutes to unanimously approve a proposal to help heroin addicts. The proposal is modeled from a &nbsp;program in DuPage County that requires police officers to carry a drug called Narcan. That drug helps save the lives of heroin addicts who have overdosed. DuPage County Coroner Rich Jorgensen explains.</p><p dir="ltr"><br /><strong>Guest:</strong><em><a href="https://www.dupageco.org/coroner/"> Rich Jorgensen</a> is the DuPage County Coroner.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207720139&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Chicago starts to feel the effects of its &quot;junk status&quot; ranking</span><br /><span id="docs-internal-guid-cd218569-9cbe-e9cd-fa76-0e7d81ac9e8a">First, there was Illinois&rsquo; pension ruling. Then, the downgrade of Chicago&rsquo;s debt by Moody&rsquo;s Investors Service. Two weeks later, the city starts to feel the effects of that downgrade to junk status. A </span>Chicago Tribune analysis shows that the City of Chicago will pay at least $70 million more on a bond deal now that Moody&rsquo;s has put the city at &ldquo;junk status,&rdquo; the lowest tier for credit ratings. That means Chicago will have to pay a lot more money to borrow money, something that&rsquo;s crucial to operating a municipal government. Joining us with more analysis is Brian Battle, Director at Performance Trust, an investment advisory firm in Chicago.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr"><br /><strong>Guest:</strong><em> Brian Battle is director at <a href="http://www.performancetrust.com/">Performance Trust</a>.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207720226&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">FCC considers plan to bridge the broadband divide</span><br /><span id="docs-internal-guid-cd218569-9cc0-281c-780d-e08890cb764a">Subsidized broadband access may soon become available to the poor. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler shared a plan today with fellow FCC commissioners that would ensure more Americans have fast internet connections. Karen Mossberger is professor and director of the School of Public Affairs at Arizona State University.</span> The former UIC professor is still researching digital inequalities in Chicago and she joins us with more on the FCC&rsquo;s plan.</p><p dir="ltr"><br /><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://spa.asu.edu/about_us/directory/faculty-profiles/karen-mossberger">Karen Mossberger</a> is professor and director of the School of Public Affairs at Arizona State University.</em></p></p> Thu, 28 May 2015 17:37:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-28/afternoon-shift-book-club-%E2%80%98all-our-names%E2%80%99-112106 MacArthur Fellows include 5 with Chicago ties http://www.wbez.org/blogs/alison-cuddy/2012-10/macarthur-fellows-include-5-chicago-ties-102820 <p><p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/RS6367_mengestu_2012_hi-res-download_3-scr.jpg" style="height: 414px; width: 620px; " title="Dinaw Mengestu is one of five MacArthur Fellows with ties to Chicago (Courtesy of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)" /></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="http://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F61951633&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;color=ffe12b" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>This year&#39;s <a href="http://www.macfound.org/fellows/class/2012/">MacArthur Fellows </a>are the usual eclectic bunch. Commonly known as &quot;genius grants,&quot; the list of 23 includes a geriatrician, a stringed instrument maker and an economist. Five&nbsp;people with ties to Chicago also got the nod.</p><p><a href="http://www.history.northwestern.edu/people/penningroth.html">Dylan Penningroth</a> is a historian at Northwestern University. His work explores African-American life during slavery and after the end of the Civil War.&nbsp;He&rsquo;s shed new light on the period, including how slaves were able to acquire and pass on property.</p><p><a href="http://www.newyorker.com/fiction/features/2010/06/14/100614fi_fiction_20under40_qa_dinaw-mengestu">Dinaw Mengestu</a> is an Ethiopian writer. He came to Illinois at a very young age.&nbsp;Since then he&rsquo;s explored the condition of Ethiopians in exile and at home.</p><p>Musician and composer <a href="http://iceorg.org/about/artist/chase">Claire Chase</a> is a co-founder of the International Contemporary Ensemble. MacArthur recognized her as the group is a significant part of Chicago&rsquo;s new music scene, including a three-year residency at the Museum of Contemporary Art.</p><p><a href="http://people.epfl.ch/melody.swartz">Melody Swartz </a>is a bioengineer originally from Glen Ellyn now based in Switzerland. Documentary filmmaker <a href="http://www.altamurafilms.com/">Natalia Almada </a>spent part of her childhood in Chicago and current works in Mexico City.</p><p>MacArthur Fellows are recognized for their potential to make significant contributions in the future. Grantees are given the financial means to do so &ndash; $500,000 paid out over five years, no strings attached.</p></p> Tue, 02 Oct 2012 09:03:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/alison-cuddy/2012-10/macarthur-fellows-include-5-chicago-ties-102820