WBEZ | Housing http://www.wbez.org/tags/housing Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Housing advocates warn property tax hike could speed gentrification http://www.wbez.org/news/housing-advocates-warn-property-tax-hike-could-speed-gentrification-113542 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AffordableRent.jpg" alt="" /><p><div><p dir="ltr"><em>Updated October 30, 2015 to include new information from the city&#39;s budget office and the Community Investment Corporation.</em></p><p dir="ltr">Residents, landlords and community organizers are warning that Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s property tax hike will accelerate gentrification on Chicago&rsquo;s Northwest side.</p><p dir="ltr">The City Council overwhelmingly approved the mayor&rsquo;s budget on Wednesday, including an incremental $543 million property tax increase slated for police and fire pensions. An additional $45 million annual property tax hike was approved for school construction and modernization projections.</p><p dir="ltr">The coalition group Communities United based its analysis on Census data and a survey of seven owners of two-flat buildings in Northwest Side neighborhoods. It concludes that the higher assessments will drive low-income renters out of Albany Park, Belmont Cragin and Lincoln Square, because building owners will most likely pass the additional cost on to their tenants.</p><div>&ldquo;Renters will be pushed out of their homes, and Chicago&rsquo;s Northwest side will continue to become a place that is only accessible to those who have very deep pockets,&rdquo; said Alderman Carlos Ramirez-Rosa (35th).</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>But during the vote on Wednesday fellow Northwest side alderman Pat O&rsquo;Connor (40), the mayor&rsquo;s floor leader, argued that the property tax was necessary to avoid cutting critical services. &ldquo;Clearly our city will decay and will denigrate and our services will be severely hampered if we do not take the appropriate steps,&rdquo; O&rsquo;Connor said.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>According to the <a href="http://communitiesunited.org/sites/apncorganizing.org/files/The%20City%20That%20Works%E2%80%A6For%20Who%3F%20Final%2010.28.15.pdf">study</a>, the pinch will be felt most acutely by tenants of small, multi-unit &nbsp;buildings, which comprise roughly one-third of the city&rsquo;s rental housing stock.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;Rents in these two- to four-flats could go up as much as $50 to $100 a month,&rdquo; said Diane Limas, board chair of Communities United.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>However, the city&rsquo;s budget office disputes the numbers and directed WBEZ to a brief by the <a href="http://www.preservationcompact.org/wp-content/uploads/Property-Tax-Increase-Impact-on-Affordable-Rental-Housing-2015.pdf">Community Investment Corporation</a>, which found that property owners would likely experience a tax increase of $10-$20 per unit in low- and moderate-income neighborhoods. In wealthier neighborhoods, the analysis found that landlords would be more likely to pass on the increase to their tenants, but that it would remain &ldquo;modest,&rdquo; at $15 or less per unit.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>In a written statement, city officials noted that a rental property would have to be worth roughly $520,000 if it were to see a property tax hike of $1,200 a year. &ldquo;The communities united (sic) case study suggests a property that is&hellip; nearly two and a half (sic) times more valuable than the median 2-6 apartment flat in the city,&rdquo; it said. &ldquo;Approximately half of the wards on the North/Northwest side have an average assessed value for 2-6 flat that is at or near the citywide average.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Stacie Young, Director of the Preservation Compact, which released the CIC report, said the rent increase estimate from Communities United&rsquo;s study sounded too high. &ldquo;But it depends on whether they&rsquo;re looking at an increase in the assessed valuation of the areas,&rdquo; she added, noting that property values in some parts of the Northwest Side have been increasing over the years.</div></div><div><p><em>Odette Yousef is WBEZ&rsquo;s North Side Bureau reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef" target="_blank">@oyousef </a>and <a href="https://twitter.com/wbezoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>.</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 28 Oct 2015 13:36:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/housing-advocates-warn-property-tax-hike-could-speed-gentrification-113542 Growth in home prices and number of home sales is cooling off http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-22/growth-home-prices-and-number-home-sales-cooling-113024 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/housing American Advisors Group.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The growth in home prices and the number of homes selling is <a href="http://www.chicagobusiness.com/realestate/20150921/CRED0701/150929996/chicago-area-home-sales-rise-in-august-illinois-realtors-say">starting to slip overall</a>. That&rsquo;s pretty typical for the end of the summer, but this year it&rsquo;s a little more pronounced. On the flip side, home values are up in some Chicago area neighborhoods and towns. And in the meantime, things on the condo front aren&rsquo;t so great.</p><p>Here to break it down for us is Crain&rsquo;s Chicago Business Real Estate Reporter <a href="https://twitter.com/Dennis_Rodkin?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor">Dennis Rodkin</a>.&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 22 Sep 2015 11:07:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-22/growth-home-prices-and-number-home-sales-cooling-113024 How China’s crash affects housing market http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-25/how-china%E2%80%99s-crash-affects-housing-market-112718 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/housing DanielSTL_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The news of a slowdown in the Chinese economy last week sent shockwaves across the globe, including the U.S. housing market. The crash has already led the federal government to say it&rsquo;s less likely to increase interest rates this fall. Crain&rsquo;s Chicago Business real estate reporter Dennis Rodkin talks about the Chinese market&rsquo;s effect on housing here in the U.S. and Chicago.</p></p> Tue, 25 Aug 2015 10:47:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-25/how-china%E2%80%99s-crash-affects-housing-market-112718 Where are Chicago's poor white neighborhoods? http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/where-are-chicagos-poor-white-neighborhoods-112639 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/whitepovertythumb3.png" alt="" /><p><div><em>Editor&#39;s note: We&#39;re considering additional coverage for this story and we&#39;d like to know which follow-up questions about concentrated white poverty most interest you. Examples: How does Chicago compare to other Midwestern cities? How does this apply to the suburbs? What additional implications does this have for life in our region? If you like one of these or have your own, please place it in the comment section below. Thanks for considering it!</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Martha Victoria Diaz, a lawyer who grew up in Lake View during the late &lsquo;70s and &lsquo;80s, remembers the Chicago neighborhood as being fairly integrated. She remembers many Latino families like her own living on the block, as well as white households. But once the neighborhood began to gentrify, working class people of all races were displaced.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Martha says that got her thinking: It was easy to identify areas of Chicago where low-income Latinos live and, for that matter, where low-income African-Americans live, too. But where had all the white people gone? She followed up by asking:</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div style="text-align: center;"><em>Where are all the poor white neighborhoods?</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Diaz was especially curious because she knows that nationally, most beneficiaries of some poverty programs are white. (We&rsquo;re talking <a href="http://kff.org/medicaid/state-indicator/distribution-by-raceethnicity-4/">Medicaid</a> and the <a href="http://www.fns.usda.gov/sites/default/files/ops/Characteristics2013.pdf">Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program</a>, aka food stamps.)</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>So in Chicago, where are all those people living? We found answers in the latest numbers from the U.S. Census Bureau, which reveal striking differences in concentrated poverty between Chicago&rsquo;s three largest racial/ethnic groups. We then called experts to explain how the disparate pictures of poverty in Chicago came to be. They also offered some big takeaways about how our attitudes about poverty and race may be shaped by housing patterns &mdash; and what that means for public policy.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><span style="font-size:24px;">First, the data. Where are Chicago&rsquo;s poor white neighborhoods?</span></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>We began with U.S. Census data, which allowed us to drill down to individual census tracts across Chicago. <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/where-are-chicagos-poor-white-neighborhoods-112639#data">After deciding on a methodology</a>, we generated a map showing areas of high-poverty for each of the races.</div><div><a href="http://interactive.wbez.org/curiouscity/poverty/" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/wbez-assets/curiouscity/mapstillFORWEB4.png" style="width: 620px; height: 395px;" /></a></div><div><div><a name="graph"></a>The data are striking. While it&rsquo;s easy to identify swaths of African-American poverty, and to a lesser extent Latino poverty, Chicago has just two isolated census tracts of white poverty, both of which are tucked away near the lake in the Rogers Park neighborhood. Looking closer, you might notice that those two tracts are in the area adjoining Loyola University&rsquo;s lakeshore campus. We might expect to see this in an area populated by college and graduate students!</div></div><div class="image-insert-image "><p data-pym-src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/wbez-dailygraphics/dailygraphics/graphics/white-poverty/child.html">&nbsp;</p><script src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/wbez-dailygraphics/dailygraphics/graphics/white-poverty/js/lib/pym.js" type="text/javascript"></script>This is not to say there&rsquo;s no white poverty in Chicago. Indeed, Census Bureau data from the 2009-2013 American Community Survey show 90,328 white Chicagoans living at or below the federal poverty level. But Martha&rsquo;s question is about concentrated white poverty. Our conclusion is that &mdash; those two North Side census tracts notwithstanding &mdash; there really is no concentrated white poverty in Chicago.<p>&nbsp;</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Why doesn&rsquo;t Chicago have concentrated white poverty?</span></p><p>This follow-up question is a logical one, given that <a href="https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2014/demo/p60-249.pdf">whites represent the largest group of poor people in the United States</a>. For answers, we first spoke with Janet Smith, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning at the University of Illinois Chicago and co-director of the Natalie P. Voorhees Center for Neighborhood and Community Improvement.</p><p><strong>Janet Smith:&nbsp;</strong><em>If I look back 40 years ago, I might have turned to a few communities that I can think of where you had more working poor people. But even then ... Hegwisch for example, you think of the far South Side of Chicago, close to the steel mills. Those were actually good-paying jobs. Even then you had white working class people ... but they weren&#39;t poor necessarily.&nbsp;I don&rsquo;t know if we ever really had concentrated white poverty in Chicago, and part of that is because whites, as opposed to blacks and Latinos, have been able to live just about anywhere. And so part of it is more of a diffusion of poverty among white folks, compared to blacks and Latinos.</em></p><p><em>What we&rsquo;ve seen since the 1970s ... is a shrinking of the white middle-income and lower-income families in the city of Chicago. So where we think they&rsquo;ve gone &mdash; and this is based on data that we get from the U.S. Census &mdash; is that they&rsquo;ve relocated probably outside the city and are living more in suburban areas.</em></p><p><em>I think that part of [why Chicago doesn&#39;t have concentrated white poverty] has to get back to a larger history of structural racism in the United States. And what I mean by that is the ability for different races to move to different places. So whites have long had an ability to move around the country and to move to different places. African-Americans have historically just not had as many choices. And Chicago &mdash; and I can think of a couple other Midwestern cities &mdash; has had a really strong history of race relations that have not been positive for African-Americans. So staying in these neighborhoods is probably a result of having limited opportunities to move elsewhere.</em></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Why does Chicago have so much concentrated black poverty?</span></p><p>It&rsquo;s clear from the data that different factors are at play within the black and Latino communities. To unpack some of the reasons that have contributed to Chicago&rsquo;s extensive areas of concentrated black poverty, we spoke with Mary Pattillo, the Harold Washington Professor of Sociology and African-American Studies at Northwestern University.</p><p><strong>Mary Pattillo:</strong><em> So the answer to the question of why there isn&rsquo;t concentrated white poverty in Chicago &mdash; and many other cities, Chicago is not alone in this &mdash; rests on two big points. One is racial residential segregation, and the other is the different poverty rates in the various race/ethnic groups. So when you combine those two together, you get concentrated black and Latino poverty, and pretty much no concentrated white poverty.</em></p><p><em>Racial residential segregation ... Let&rsquo;s begin with the fact that Chicago is an old city, much of which was built before the Fair Housing Act of 1968 [and] a lot of which [was] built during a time when we had what were called racial restrictive covenants. [These] were agreements ... that white homeowners entered amongst each other to exclude mostly blacks, but in some cities and in some times they also excluded Jewish people. They also excluded Chinese people, depending on what city and what was the marginalized group at the time.</em></p><p><em>The federal government is not at all innocent in this. The federal government very much underwrote the suburbanization of whites and the concentration of blacks in the city. So the building of the suburbs was very much supported by the federal government&rsquo;s insuring of mortgages, and that allowed the banks to give a lot more mortgages, but they only insured those mortgages in neighborhoods that, as they said, didn&rsquo;t house &ldquo;inharmonious racial groups&rdquo; ... which basically meant if there were any prospect of black people moving in, they wouldn&rsquo;t support the mortgage. So this very much created residential racial segregation, not just in the city of Chicago but also in the metropolitan area, by supporting the suburbanization of whites and the concentration of blacks in the city in &mdash; what the federal government also built &mdash; which were public housing projects.</em></p><p><strong>WBEZ: Do any of these factors still play out today, or have new ones crept in?</strong></p><p><strong>Mary Pattillo: </strong><em>The research today still finds housing discrimination. Sometimes it&rsquo;s the blatant discrimination: A black person calls and the realtor says that apartment&rsquo;s been rented. ... So black folks have to work extra hard to see the same number of units as whites. ... But there is something to preferences and knowledge. What neighborhoods do people know about? And, how do you know about neighborhoods? You know about the neighborhoods where your friends live. And if our friendship patterns are racially segregated, then we know about the neighborhoods where other black people live if we&rsquo;re black, or the neighborhoods where other Latinos live if we&rsquo;re Latino. So there&rsquo;s knowledge, and there&rsquo;s preferences and comfort.</em></p><p><strong>WBEZ: Are we seeing higher-income blacks mix up the incomes in some of these high-poverty neighborhoods?</strong></p><p><strong>Mary Pattillo:</strong> <em>That&rsquo;s an excellent question. Let&rsquo;s say you had complete racial residential segregation &mdash; which we don&rsquo;t have, but in Chicago, we almost do &mdash; so that if the black poverty rate is 30 percent, that means all black neighborhoods should have a 30 percent poverty rate, if everybody is kind of shuffled around. But that&rsquo;s not the case. You have class segregation within race. Class segregation among blacks is higher than among both whites and Latinos. So when you measure, as you mentioned, the evenness of the classes within the predominantly black, Latino or white neighborhoods, you find that there is greater pull-away between poor blacks and upper income blacks than there is between poor whites and upper income whites and poor Latinos and upper income Latinos.</em></p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align: center;"><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/where-are-chicagos-poor-white-neighborhoods-112639#graph"><strong><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Chart: Comparison of Chicago residents living in poverty, by race</span></strong></a></em></p><p><strong>WBEZ: Can we account for the psychology, in any way, behind that high level of class segregation among blacks?</strong></p><p><strong>Mary Pattillo:</strong> <em>It is both that many populations don&rsquo;t want to live around poor people (it&rsquo;s a reflection on them, they think) and because what goes along with neighborhoods that have high poverty rates are things like fewer services, schools that are less well invested. ... I think for many reasons people see high-poverty neighborhoods as lacking in the kind of resources and amenities that they want for themselves and for their kids.</em></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Why is there concentrated Latino poverty in Chicago?</span></p><p>Our experts told us that some of the factors behind concentrated black poverty in Chicago also apply to the question of why we see some areas of concentrated Latino poverty. Researchers have conducted studies where &ldquo;testers&rdquo; of different races and ethnic backgrounds are deployed to inquire about available housing in cities across the U.S. These studies have exposed disparate treatment of Latinos and whites, just as they have found disparate treatment between African-Americans and whites.</p><p>However, many Latino neighborhoods are also landing spots for new immigrants, so we spoke with Sylvia Puente, Executive Director of the Latino Policy Forum. We asked her how immigration, and other unique explanations, might lie behind the data.</p><p><strong>Sylvia Puente: </strong><em>So Latino poverty, to a large extent, you&rsquo;re really going to see families, you&rsquo;re going to see two-parent households &mdash; a married mom and dad with kids &mdash; but they&rsquo;re only able to earn a wage which doesn&rsquo;t take them past the poverty level.</em></p><p><em>A significant number of adults are working in low-wage labor markets. ... That&rsquo;s among all Latinos, but especially for those who are undocumented or unauthorized in this country. They&rsquo;re living in a shadow economy that sometimes doesn&rsquo;t even pay minimum wage. ... A significant number of Latinos are low-wage workers for a variety of reasons, and then people choose to live where they have friends and family. Where they go to church and Mass is in the language that they&rsquo;re most comfortable in, and they can go grocery shopping and know people from their home communities.</em></p><p><em>It&rsquo;s always, I think, an interesting question to say, &ldquo;Are these ethnic enclaves, or are they ghettos?&rdquo; And I think that a community can be both, and I don&rsquo;t mean ghetto in a negative way. But [with ghettos], we see large concentrations of poverty. We don&rsquo;t see a lot of economic activity. We see large concentrations of people in the same ethnic group living there who don&rsquo;t have a way out. [Whereas] ethnic enclaves have, maybe, a lot of those same characteristics. ... Ethnic enclaves are [where] people are choosing to live in these communities, because certainly with Latinos, they can go to the store in Spanish. They can go to the grocery store and find products from their home country, they can cook meals that are familiar to them. A lot of what we&rsquo;ve seen in terms of Latino concentration are people literally coming from the same village in Mexico or in another country, so you go where you know people. And ethnic enclaves also [are] people choosing to live with people who are like them because it&rsquo;s home, it&rsquo;s familiar. There&rsquo;s a certain comfort in that.</em></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">What does it mean if, when we talk about concentrated poverty in Chicago, we really are only talking about communities of color?</span></p><p><strong>Sylvia Puente:</strong> <em>One of the concerns that I have around it is that we have two Chicagos. We have a thriving white middle class Chicago who largely lives along the lakefront and on the Northwest Side of the city, and Chicago is big enough that you don&rsquo;t have to go into a South Side neighborhood ever in your whole life. And I&rsquo;m certainly of the belief that to have compassion, to really address all the social challenges that we have in our state, you&rsquo;ve got to get out of your comfort zone and understand how people live.</em></p><p><strong>Mary Pattillo:</strong> &nbsp;<em>I think that that contributes to our misunderstanding of poverty in general, our misunderstanding of welfare and social services, and I think it contributes to a kind of political conservatism because we can point to those &ldquo;other people.&rdquo; If we&rsquo;re white, we can point to those other people (and think) &ldquo;Something&rsquo;s wrong with black people, something&rsquo;s wrong with Latinos. White people &mdash; look, you don&rsquo;t see any poor white neighborhoods.&rdquo; But there are poor white people, there are lots of poor white people. But because they&rsquo;re not visibly located in a single place, it doesn&rsquo;t lend itself to our stigmatizing them.</em></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Martha&rsquo;s conclusions</span></p><p><a name="data"></a>After hearing input from our three experts, we asked our questioner, Martha Diaz, to reflect on what resonated with her, as a Latina who grew up in a working-class background but attained a college education and lives in today&rsquo;s gentrified Lake View neighborhood.</p><p><strong>Martha Diaz:</strong> <em>Well, I suppose much of the outcome of your life depends on circumstances that are really beyond your control. My parents bought the three-flat that we have in Lake View not because they were speculating, not because they thought that Lake View was going to be the next big thing, but because it was cheaper than the house near the brickyard mall that they had originally been scoping out. And as a result of that, they put themselves and our family in the middle of a community that was about to gentrify. And, as a result of that, my brothers and I had access to better schools probably than our peers did in other parts of the city. And it was serendipitous and wonderful in the example of our family because it made everything for us possible, it made my life possible. But that&rsquo;s obviously not the case for a lot of people in this city.</em></p><hr /><p><strong>How we worked with data</strong></p><p>To get to the bottom of Martha Diaz&rsquo;s question, we had to decide whether a geographic area can be associated with a single, predominant race. We also had to define &ldquo;concentrated poverty.&rdquo; There are lots of ways that one could slice and dice the data, and we took just one approach.</p><p>We started with the 2009-2013 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, and examined racial breakdowns within each census tract in Chicago. We decided on a generous definition, characterizing a census tract as predominantly of a single race &mdash; Latino, African-American or white &mdash; if a plurality of people in the tract were of that race.</p><p>Next, we looked at incomes of the predominant races in those census tracts. We used the commonly-accepted definition of &ldquo;high-poverty areas,&rdquo; which are census tracts where the poverty rate (the percentage of people living at or below the federal poverty level) is at or exceeds 40 percent. To find tracts of concentrated white poverty, for example, we looked at the &ldquo;white tracts&rdquo; and asked whether more than 40 percent of those whites are living in poverty. We also disqualified tracts with population counts low enough to raise concerns about statistical confidence. (See &quot;Coefficient of variation&quot; and related listings in the Census Bureau&#39;s <a href="http://www.census.gov/about/policies/quality/standards/glossary.html#c" target="_blank">Glossary of Statistical Quality Standards</a>). &nbsp;</p><p><em>Odette Yousef is a WBEZ reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef">@oyousef</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/wbezoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>. Chris Hagan analyzed Census data and generated maps for this story.</em></p><p><em>Chris Hagan is a data reporter for WBEZ. Follow him&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/chrishagan">@chrishagan</a>.</em></p><div><em>CORRECTION: A previous version of this story used a graphic that displayed incorrect figures regarding national poverty rates relative to those of Chicago&#39;s. The graphic has been corrected, suggesting a closer alignment between national poverty rates within white, black and Latino communities and their Chicago counterparts.</em></div></div><script src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/wbez-dailygraphics/dailygraphics/graphics/white-poverty/js/lib/pym.js" type="text/javascript"></script></p> Wed, 12 Aug 2015 17:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/where-are-chicagos-poor-white-neighborhoods-112639 Morning Shift: July 13, 2015 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-13/morning-shift-july-13-2015-112371 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214564263&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Morning Shift: July 13, 2015</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Today on the Morning Shift, we take a look back at Chicago&#39;s 1995 heat wave that killed 739 people. We also hear about artistic responses to the disaster. Plus, the FBI has been ensnaring young Muslims in the Chicago area on terrorism charges. We look at the bureau&#39;s tactics and whether, in some cases, they may go too far. We&#39;ll look at a &quot;not-in-my-backyard&quot; tussle over renting vs. owning in the West Loop. And finally, we get a review of last weekend&#39;s Taste of Chicago.</span></p></p> Mon, 13 Jul 2015 15:54:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-13/morning-shift-july-13-2015-112371 ‘Unconscious discrimination’ at play in the West Loop? http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-13/%E2%80%98unconscious-discrimination%E2%80%99-play-west-loop-112369 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214562738&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit;">&lsquo;Unconscious discrimination&rsquo; at play in the West Loop?</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Coming under fire for racially-charged comments made at a recent community meeting about rental development in the West Loop, Alderman Walter Burnett said he stands by his comments about the area becoming a &lsquo;bigot neighborhood.&rsquo;</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Many residents spoke out against more rental units coming to the West Loop, stressing homeowners provide stability to a neighborhood; renters come and go quickly. Burnett said preferring renters only or homeowners only is a form of &ldquo;unconscious discrimination&rdquo; and he&rsquo;s fed up. Alderman Burnett joins us to discuss what measures he&rsquo;s putting in place to make sure the area is a mixed community. Carla Agostinelli, executive director of the West Loop Community Organization, also joins us talk about how the group wants to promote a responsibly diverse community.</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:</span></strong><span style="font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit;">&nbsp;<em><a href="https://twitter.com/AldermanBurnett">Walter Burnett</a> is a Chicago alderman and Carla Agostinelli is the executive director of <a href="http://westloop.org/">West Loop Community Organization</a>.&nbsp;</em></span></p></p> Mon, 13 Jul 2015 15:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-13/%E2%80%98unconscious-discrimination%E2%80%99-play-west-loop-112369 Mumford and Sons' concert displaces homeless http://www.wbez.org/sections/lifestyle/mumford-and-sons-concert-displaces-homeless-112222 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/row-of-orange-.jpg" style="float: right; height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="(WBEZ/Melissa Muto)" /></div><p dir="ltr">Advocates say a delayed outdoor rock concert in Chicago&rsquo;s Uptown neighborhood has created uncertainty about if and when a homeless encampment can return to the area.</p><p><strong>One woman&#39;s journey from under the bridge and back:</strong><iframe frameborder="no" height="20" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212139049&amp;color=ff5500&amp;inverse=false&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_user=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr">For months now, a line of nearly 20 tents in orange and blue have lined both sides of Wilson Avenue under the Lake Shore Drive bridge. That&rsquo;s where about 40 homeless people have been living and had formed a makeshift community. There was a similar encampment under the Lawrence Avenue viaduct. Each person or family had an unofficial space, surrounding their tents with belongings including wheeled carts, camping chairs and even a full-sized grill that some of the men took turns cooking on.</p><p dir="ltr">But all of that changed earlier this week in advance of a Mumford and Sons concert that is expected to draw thousands to nearby Montrose Beach. Originally scheduled for Wednesday, the concert was postponed until Friday.</p><p dir="ltr">On Tuesday, city workers ordered the homeless people to leave so they could clean the area. The workers also threw away many of the people&rsquo;s belongings, including blankets and clothing, in what advocates call a violation of city policy.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;You know, it&rsquo;s like we&rsquo;re not people, like our stuff doesn&rsquo;t matter,&rdquo; said a homeless woman named Susan, who declined to give her last name. &ldquo;We&rsquo;ve got nowhere to go. We&rsquo;re just trying to live.&rdquo;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><a href="http://llnw.wbez.org/insert-images/G-truck-and-red-sign_0.jpg" target="_blank"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/G-truck-and-red-sign_0.jpg" style="float: left; height: 377px; width: 620px;" title="(WBEZ/Melissa Muto)" /></a></div></div><p dir="ltr">Susan said she was devastated about losing her blankets: &ldquo;They&rsquo;re even expensive at the secondhand store when they&rsquo;re half-off. It gets cold out here &mdash; we were freezing in May.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Clearing out a viaduct under a bridge isn&rsquo;t unusual: The city routinely asks people who are homeless to leave for short periods of time so they can clean the area.</p><p dir="ltr">But advocates say it was different this time. They charge the city violated its own policy for handling the personal property of the homeless.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;There&rsquo;s an <a href="http://www.chicagohomeless.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/City-Policy-and-Procedures-Governing-Off-Street-Cleaning.pdf">agreement</a> that before property&rsquo;s thrown out, people should get notice if there&rsquo;s a problem with the property and have time to do something with the property,&rdquo;said Patricia Nix-Hodes, an attorney for the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless. &ldquo;That didn&rsquo;t happen.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Workers put up a sign saying the cleanup would start at 10 a.m. Tuesday. Instead, a team of ten city workers arrived in a van around 9. They said they were following city orders to clean the area and were instructed to throw out anything in their way. Some bags, carts, and boxes were still under the viaduct.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Marcus-Cart-CU.jpg" style="height: 400px; width: 300px; float: right;" title="(WBEZ/Melissa Muto)" /></div><p dir="ltr">Rene Heybach, another attorney for the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless, said she told the workers they were early for the cleanup and to stop what they were doing. They reportedly refused.</p><p dir="ltr">She said she told them they were in violation of the city agreement. But Heybach said that none of the workers she spoke to Tuesday had been properly trained in that protocol, and none of them, including the supervisor, had even heard of it.</p><p dir="ltr">The supervisor on the ground did order her staff to weed whack and cut the lawn first to give people more time to remove their things.</p><p dir="ltr">But Heybach said the city&rsquo;s approach to clearing the area this week was disorganized and confusing. She said they created an emergency situation and added undue stress while not offering any help for the situation.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Everyone is saying different things, they are not coordinating,&rdquo; said Heybach, &ldquo;Everyone&rsquo;s been confused and remains confused.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Susan, the homeless woman who lost her blankets in the cleaning, said workers put up signs with Tuesday&rsquo;s date for the street cleaning. But she said they told her a day earlier that she had to leave, and that she&rsquo;d only have to leave for a day.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;They changed their story, they are trying to get us messed up so we lose all our stuff,&rdquo; Susan said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s like we&rsquo;re not people, like we don&rsquo;t exist.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Susan, who said she struggles with anxiety, PTSD, neuropathy and other medical conditions, was a single parent and ran a daycare before becoming homeless.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;It&rsquo;s embarrassing that life can get this low,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re not bad people, we&rsquo;re just homeless.&rdquo; &nbsp;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/from-hill-USE.jpg" style="float: left; height: 470px; width: 620px;" title="(WBEZ/Melissa Muto)" /></div><p dir="ltr">Attorney Rene Heybach said the Department of Family and Support Services was supposed to help transport some of the homeless people and their items to a nearby safe location. The city agreement says the DFSS &ldquo;will lead the City&rsquo;s contact with homeless persons during the cleanings.&rdquo; &nbsp;But she said DFSS didn&rsquo;t arrive until after the other city crews were already there and clearing the area.</p><p dir="ltr">DFSS spokesman Matt Smith said the department&rsquo;s team is trained in the procedure for handling homeless people&rsquo;s belongings, which includes notification so there&rsquo;s &ldquo;ample time to prepare and remove their possessions from the area being cleaned.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">He said this cleaning was different than routine monthly ones because multiple other city services were involved. The size of the concert also made it necessary for people living under the bridge to leave the area for a longer time period. &nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">Smith said the show is expected to draw thousands and will bring a lot of foot traffic there. He said having tents and people blocking the sidewalks would present a health and public safety issue.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;What I believe we are going to be doing is taking tents or possessions or anything that shouldn&rsquo;t be here &hellip; and taking them to a shelter and inventorying them,&rdquo; Smith said. &ldquo;If they want to reclaim those items later, they can make arrangements with our staff to do so.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">But by the time DFSS arrived, workers from other departments had cleaned out all but a few items remaining beneath the viaduct.</p><p dir="ltr">DFSS encouraged people to sign up for a system that determines eligibility for supportive housing. The Salvation Army showed up to offer their services too. But Smith said even though people were offered shelter, the city can&rsquo;t force them to take it.</p><p dir="ltr">Susan says she was abused in a local homeless shelter, and doesn&rsquo;t want to go back.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Latia-Sleeping-2.jpg" style="float: right; height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="(WBEZ/Melissa Muto)" /></div><p dir="ltr">People who&rsquo;d been living under the bridge spent Tuesday spreading their remaining belongings on the grass and over benches at a nearby park to dry out from a rainstorm. Some did go to shelters, while others found temporary housing with family.</p><p dir="ltr">But several of them have spent the week sleeping in the open on blankets and mats. They said DFSS had found them temporary storage for their stuff at a nearby CVS.</p><p dir="ltr">Susan had planned to join them in the park, but said she was afraid to sleep out in the open like that. She found temporary shelter across town instead.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t want to just lay on the ground on top of blankets, I&rsquo;m a woman, I need privacy,&rdquo; Susan said. &ldquo;Every other woman (who lives) down there has a man, or husband or someone to protect them. I don&rsquo;t.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">But like many of the others, Susan plans to return to her spot under the bridge as soon as she can.</p><p>It&rsquo;s unclear when, or if, that will happen. Thursday, a representative from the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless said she had not heard back from the city on whether the homeless people could return after the concert.</p><p><em>Melissa Muto is a WBEZ Pritzker Journalism Fellow.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 19 Jun 2015 13:56:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/sections/lifestyle/mumford-and-sons-concert-displaces-homeless-112222 Afternoon Shift: The state of Chicago’s Catholic schools http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-19/afternoon-shift-state-chicago%E2%80%99s-catholic-schools-112055 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/521148646_1ad14eeebd_z.jpg" style="height: 415px; width: 620px;" title="(Photo: Flickr/Stephen Kallao)" /></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206274349&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Chicago Catholic high schools face closures</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e32-cc0d-e9fb-32487d8b4fb3">On WBEZ we have a lot of conversations about the state of our public school system. But there are also more than 80,000 students in the Catholic school system here in Chicago. in 2014, the Archdiocese said about a dozen of its 240 schools would either be closed or merged. Several of those schools that are closing will hold their final graduation ceremonies in a few weeks. </span>We assess the state of the Catholic school system and &nbsp;talk about the impact of the continuing closures. We also hear from the principal of a storied high school on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side that reports a 100 percent college enrollment rate and is in danger of closing.<br /><br /><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em>Nichole Jackson is principal at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.halesfranciscanhs.org/">Hales Franciscan School</a>.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e32-cc0d-e9fb-32487d8b4fb3">Ryan James is a sophomore at&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.halesfranciscanhs.org/">Hales Franciscan School</a>.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e32-cc0d-e9fb-32487d8b4fb3">Michael James is a&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.halesfranciscanhs.org/">Hales Franciscan School</a>&nbsp;parent.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e32-cc0d-e9fb-32487d8b4fb3">Thomas McGrath is Chief Operating Officer for Catholic Schools at the&nbsp;</span><a href="http://archchicago.org/">Archdiocese of Chicago</a>.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e32-cc0d-e9fb-32487d8b4fb3">Angela Ybarra is a&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.sthyacinthbasilicaschool.org/">St. Hyacinth Basilica</a>&nbsp;parent.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e32-cc0d-e9fb-32487d8b4fb3"><a href="http://law.nd.edu/directory/nicole-garnett/">Nicole Stelle Garnett</a></span>&nbsp;is policy coordinator at the Alliance for Catholic Education and law professor at University of Notre Dame.</em></li></ul><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206274087&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Journalist brings together Holocaust survivors and the son of a WWII soldier</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e36-f147-7960-21e0ccefa439">70 years ago, in May of 1945, US army soldiers - including the 11th Armored Division liberated the Nazi concentration camp Mauthausen in Austria. Among those soldiers was a Chicago sergeant named Albert Kosiek. Among the thousands of prisoners that Kosiek helped were three women who had just given birth. Mark Olsky is one of those babies. He joins us along with Larry Kosiek, one of Sergeant Kosiek&rsquo;s sons and Wendy Holden, the British journalist that brought them together. Wendy has documented this incredible story in her book, </span>Born Survivors: Three Young Mothers and Their Extraordinary Story of Courage, Defiance and Hope.<br /><br /><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e36-f147-7960-21e0ccefa439"><a href="https://twitter.com/wendholden">Wendy Holden</a></span> is a journalist and author.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e36-f147-7960-21e0ccefa439"><a href="http://www.jsonline.com/news/milwaukee/born-amid-death-holocaust-survivors-life-comes-full-circle-b99478446z1-299459651.html">Mark Olsky</a></span> is a doctor and a Holocaust survivor.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e36-f147-7960-21e0ccefa439"><a href="http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20150518/news/150518755/">Larry Kosiek</a></span> is the son of Sgt. Albert Kosiek.</em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206271451&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Gloria Estefan musical debuts in Chicago</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e3a-1d2a-021c-779e4a9a78b2">Gloria Estefan is known as the queen of Latin Pop. The Cuban-American songstress is one of the most recognizable artists in the world, and now her life has been put to yet another soundtrack. </span>On Your Feet! is the bio-musical of Gloria and her husband, Emilio Estefan. The show makes its pre-Broadway premiere here in Chicago on June 2. We caught up with the Estefans at the Oriental Theater to speak about their new show.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e3a-1d2a-021c-779e4a9a78b2">Guests:</span></strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e3a-1d2a-021c-779e4a9a78b2"><a href="https://twitter.com/GloriaEstefan">Gloria Estefan</a></span> is a singer, songwriter and actress.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e3a-1d2a-021c-779e4a9a78b2"><a href="https://twitter.com/EmilioEstefanJr">Emilio Estefan</a></span> is a producer and director.&nbsp;</em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206271457&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Prices on the rise in Chicago&#39;s trendy neighborhoods</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">For anyone who follows Chicago real estate, the list of the hottest neighborhoods comes as no surprise: you&rsquo;ve got West Town, the Near West Side, Logan Square, Avondale, Lincoln Square and North Center. They&rsquo;re also the neighborhoods that have seen the greatest price appreciation since 2000. Dennis Rodkin from Crain&rsquo;s Chicago Business breaks down what it means for Chicago&rsquo;s housing market.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e3b-534f-e4da-b2a2594c91b0">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/Dennis_Rodkin">Dennis Rodkin</a> is a Crain&rsquo;s Chicago Business reporter.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206262122&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Tech Shift: The origins of Bitcoin with Nathaniel Popper</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e3c-e1a3-729e-3e0fede3fa8d">Ever since Bitcoin was created in 2008 it has gotten a lot of buzz. Wall Street, whole governments and even presidential candidates have expressed interest in the viability of the digital currency. But it hasn&#39;t exactly changed the world yet. Could it? </span><em>New York Times</em> reporter Nathaniel Popper has a new book out, <em>Digital Gold: Bitcoin and the Inside Story of the Misfits and Millionaires Trying to Reinvent Money</em>. He joins us to dig into the secretive history of Bitcoin. &nbsp;&nbsp;<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong><em> <a href="https://twitter.com/nathanielpopper">Nathaniel Popper</a> is a reporter and author of the book &quot;Digital Gold.&quot;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206126356&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Illinois uses &quot;lifebooks&quot; to help foster kids maintain a real sense of where they came from</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">This story is about kids in foster care in Illinois. You&rsquo;re probably bracing for sad information. And there&rsquo;s some of that. But mainly, this is a story about a little tool designed to help kids in temporary homes maintain a real sense of who they are and where they came from. WBEZ&rsquo;s Patrick Smith has more.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e3e-e181-e9ec-19250a2c4143">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/pksmid">Patrick Smith</a> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206271465&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Experts brainstorm solutions to Chicago&#39;s money problems</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">As Mayor Rahm Emanuel begins his second term in office, the City of Chicago is in a precarious financial situation. In May, all three credit ratings agencies downgraded the city. Chicago Public Schools and the park district also took a hit. Chicago is facing a $550 million hole for fire and police pensions, and a billion dollar budget deficit for CPS. Tuesday at the City Club of Chicago, financial experts came together to break down the city&rsquo;s financial woes and to discuss solutions. WBEZ&rsquo;s Susie An and Brian Battle of the Chicago-based advisory firm, Performance Trust, join us with details</p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e40-c351-19c2-175ffe0be883">Guests: </span></strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><a href="https://twitter.com/soosieon"><em>Susie An</em></a><em> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e40-c351-19c2-175ffe0be883"><a href="http://www.performancetrust.com/what-we-do/analytics-group/bios#brian-j-battle">Brian Battle</a></span> is a Director of Analytics Group at Performance Trust.</em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/206271467&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Cook County jail gets a new boss</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">For what&rsquo;s believed to be the first time, a clinical psychologist has been named to lead the Cook County Jail. Dr. Nneka Jones Tapia will manage the facility and its eight thousand inmates, one quarter of which have a mental health issue. Dr. Jones Tapia helped to launch the mental health transition center with Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart, which provides immediate mental health services to people accused of petty crimes. Sheriff Dart introduced Dr. Jones Tapia on Tuesday at the center, WBEZ&rsquo;s Yolanda Perdomo was at the event and has details.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-dd6b2f9d-6e41-d301-6dcf-a1b59417fb17">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/yolandanews">Yolanda Perdomo</a> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></p></p> Tue, 19 May 2015 16:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-19/afternoon-shift-state-chicago%E2%80%99s-catholic-schools-112055 Rents may be going up, but residents say they're not going anywhere http://www.wbez.org/news/rents-may-be-going-residents-say-theyre-not-going-anywhere-111269 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Land-trust-2.png" style="height: 240px; width: 320px; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px; float: left;" title="(from right) Arturo Chavez and his roommate, Jorge Herrera, share an apartment for $700 a month in Albany Park. A new building owner is evicting them to convert the units into upscale rentals." />There&rsquo;s a fight brewing in Albany Park over who gets to live there.</p><p>Arturo Chavez would like to stay in the North Side neighborhood, where he&rsquo;s lived for roughly three years &mdash; but that seems increasingly unlikely.</p><p>&ldquo;I go around in a car, looking for places,&rdquo; he says, speaking in Spanish. &ldquo;I see ads, and I call the numbers. Some places were being remodeled. I was told they were going to rent it, but later they told me they had already leased it to family members.&rdquo;</p><p>Chavez is one of the few remaining tenants of 3001 W Lawrence Avenue, a courtyard apartment building with 32 units. In August, new owners bought the building and notified its tenants that they were all to be evicted. The plan is to gut rehab the units and turn them into upscale rentals.</p><p>Inside, ceiling pipes have started to leak and parts of the walls are falling off. Chavez, a car mechanic who has been fighting for workers compensation since he was injured last year on the job, knows he&rsquo;ll have to leave soon. But he says he hasn&rsquo;t been able to find another place nearby that comes close to the $700 monthly rent he pays now.</p><p>&ldquo;The rents are too high and that means people are being separated and they&rsquo;re moving to areas farther away,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Antonio Gutierrez, an organizer with the community group Centro Autonomo in Albany Park, says scores of low-income Albany Park residents have been pushed out in recent years. Just like Chavez, they&rsquo;ve been unable to keep up with the rising rents and property values in some areas.</p><p>&ldquo;I would say about 40 percent of them, they ended up having to leave Albany Park and having to move outside the city to suburbs,&rdquo; said Gutierrez.</p><p>Between 2011 and 2013, the median home price in Albany Park rose almost 40 percent. Gutierrez says after the recession, speculators flocked back to the neighborhood, buying foreclosed homes and driving up property values.</p><p>So last year, Centro Autonomo decided to try a creative idea to bolster affordable properties in the neighborhood: it created a &ldquo;community land trust&rdquo; called Casas del Pueblo. The land trust is a non-profit entity that will acquire properties in the neighborhood, then rent them out.</p><p>&ldquo;(The rent) would just be the taxes for the property, the insurance for the property and a maintenance fee,&rdquo; Gutierrez explained. &ldquo;And they can stay there for as long as they want.&rdquo;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Albany-Park-Median-Home-Sales-Price-Median-Sales-Price_chartbuilder.png" style="height: 349px; width: 620px;" title="" /></div><p>The concept of community land trusts is not new to the Chicago area. Gutierrez&rsquo;s variety is a slight twist on something that&rsquo;s been tried before, just a few miles south, in West Humboldt Park.</p><p>There, three, red brick single family homes sit on a residential street next to the noisy Union Pacific rail line.</p><p>&ldquo;The homeowners say the walls were built in a way it&rsquo;s not really bothersome,&rdquo; said William Howard, former Executive Director of the West Humboldt Park Development Council.</p><p>Under Howard, the Council created the First Community Land Trust of Chicago, also a non-profit, in 2003. He said residents at that time were worried their neighborhood might become unaffordable. With the alderman&rsquo;s support, the land trust bought city property for $1 and built the 3-bedroom homes.</p><p>&ldquo;Were it not for these spots, the gentrification would have just swamped everybody,&rdquo; said Howard. &ldquo;A lot of people would have moved out.&rdquo;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Land-trust.png" title="William Howard led the establishment of the first community land trust in Chicago in 2003. It built three, single-family homes that remain affordable, though the recession halted its expansion. (WBEZ/Odette Yousef)" /></div><p>Howard&rsquo;s land trust follows a more conventional model than the one in Albany Park.</p><p>Instead of renting the homes, it offered them for sale.</p><p>&ldquo;The land trust owns this land in perpetuity,&rdquo; he explained. &ldquo;And then we get the homeowners, and the homeowners own the house.&rdquo;</p><p>Howard said three things keep land trust homes affordable. First, homeowners don&rsquo;t buy the land; they only buy the house itself. That means the house sells for much less than its market value.</p><p>Second, homeowners have to agree to resale restrictions.</p><p>&ldquo;Even if the homeowners decides later on they want to sell the home, they must sell it to someone of a like economic profile,&rdquo; said Howard. &ldquo;Otherwise the land trust goes bust.&rdquo;</p><p>In other words, homeowners have to sell the home to someone that qualifies as low-income. That keeps the resale price of the house low.</p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="320" scrolling="no" src="http://interactive.wbez.org/gentrification/widget/14/" style="float: right; clear: right;" width="400"></iframe></p><p>Finally, homeowners only pay property taxes on the value of the house, not including the land.</p><p>Howard originally wanted to build ten homes, but the timing didn&rsquo;t work out.</p><p>&ldquo;We only got three up,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t think anyone at that point had any idea that the recession would last as long as it did or be as deep as it was.&rdquo;</p><p>During the recession concerns about gentrification in West Humboldt Park fizzled out.</p><p>The First Community Land Trust of Chicago still exists, but only to collect the nominal monthly ground lease from the three homeowners in those homes. Property values in the neighborhood dropped so much after the housing bubble burst that it doesn&rsquo;t make sense for the land trust to build additional homes.</p><p>But there is another Chicago-area land trust that&rsquo;s flourishing. It&rsquo;s north of the city, in Highland Park. Luisa Espinosa-Lara and her family once struggled just to rent in this wealthy suburb.</p><p>&ldquo;We thought OK, one day (when) we are able to buy a house, it&rsquo;s not going to be here,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;Houses here are so expensive.&rdquo;</p><p>But thanks to Community Partners for Affordable Housing, Illinois&rsquo;s oldest and largest community land trust, Espinosa-Lara and her husband were able to buy a three-bedroom house in Highland Park. They paid $175,000 for it, roughly half of its market value.</p><p>&ldquo;It was like when you feel that you win the lottery, but like you get millions,&rdquo; she said, &ldquo;because you don&rsquo;t have to go. And I think it&rsquo;s so painful when you have to leave.&rdquo;</p><p>In Highland Park, the community land trust isn&rsquo;t really about gentrification. Instead, it&rsquo;s about creating inclusive, mixed-income neighborhoods.</p><p>That&rsquo;s what Antonio Gutierrez hopes to do back in Chicago&rsquo;s Albany Park neighborhood. But he&rsquo;s taking on a big challenge. Community land trusts typically need hundreds of thousands of dollars in startup costs, to buy, renovate or build homes. Most of them rely on a mix of public grants and private donations.</p><p>Casas del Pueblo doesn&rsquo;t have that kind of money, so Gutierrez hopes to persuade banks to donate foreclosed homes to the community land trust. So far, this strategy has yet to bear fruit.</p><p>&ldquo;Every single time I get to a meeting with a bank, the first thing they ask is how many houses do you have now? How many houses are you managing? And when we say zero, they close the door,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Still, Gutierrez remains undeterred.</p><p>He believes once they have a couple of homes, others will look to his community land trust as a model for how gentrification can benefit even those it would normally displace.</p><p><em>Odette Yousef is WBEZ&rsquo;s North Side Bureau reporter. Follow her </em><a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef"><em>@oyousef</em></a><em> and </em><a href="https://twitter.com/wbezoutloud"><em>@WBEZoutloud</em></a><em>.</em></p></p> Fri, 19 Dec 2014 08:15:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/rents-may-be-going-residents-say-theyre-not-going-anywhere-111269 In 'up-and-coming' area, what's the tipping point for gentrification? http://www.wbez.org/news/and-coming-area-whats-tipping-point-gentrification-111236 <p><p>On a recent weekday, Reid Mackin of the Belmont Central Chamber of Commerce shows off one of the main commercial strips in the Belmont Cragin neighborhood on the Northwest Side.</p><p>There&rsquo;s a Cricket wireless store on the corner, A&amp;G Fresh Market down the street and a Polish restaurant that nods to the area&rsquo;s past.</p><p>&ldquo;We used to have a lot of franchise foods, but because of the independent restaurants, the franchise food places couldn&rsquo;t compete with those folks,&rdquo; Mackin said.</p><p>But these aren&rsquo;t the restaurants you&rsquo;d find in a destination neighborhood like Logan Square. Over the years, that neighborhood has obviously gentrified. The rent&rsquo;s gone up and the white population has increased. The median home price for 2013 was $360,000, above its previous peak.</p><p>Belmont Cragin isn&rsquo;t experiencing anything like Logan Square&rsquo;s turbo-charged economy. But as it comes back from the housing crisis, some wonder: is this healthy redevelopment or the beginnings of gentrification?</p><p>&ldquo;I can&rsquo;t tell you how many clients that have started in Logan Square or they&rsquo;ve started in Humboldt Park and they end up looking in Belmont Cragin,&rdquo; said <a href="https://www.redfin.com/real-estate-agents/clayton-jirak">Clayton Jirak, Redfin realtor</a>.</p><p>Jirak says new buyers are attracted to the neighborhood&rsquo;s bungalow belt. They like the solid housing stock and prices ranging from around $150,000 to $300,000.</p><p>&ldquo;The other big factor in Belmont Cragin has been the redevelopment and the renovation that&rsquo;s been going on with a lot of distressed properties that were left over from the real estate recession,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Belmont Cragin hasn&rsquo;t fully recovered, but in 2013 its median home price was up nearly 24 percent from its lowest point after the housing crash. At the high end of the market, a newly flipped home was recently listed at $435,000.</p><p>Those types of sales worry Julio Rodriguez. He&rsquo;s the director of financial education for the Northwest Side Housing Center.</p><p>He says some longtime residents are getting priced out because of those investors.</p><p>&ldquo;Our goal is to have it community owned and have community residents involved. But it&rsquo;s kind of hard to accomplish that when we have so many developers coming in buying, flipping it and renting out for a couple of years and selling it once home prices go up,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>The organization&rsquo;s executive director James Rudyk points to Logan Square where a small number of investors own a lot of property.</p><p>&ldquo;What may have started off as a good idea &mdash; let&rsquo;s get some new apartments, let&rsquo;s create loft space, or lets put in new retail or a coffee shop. Great, great, great. But when that happens then all of a sudden folks who have been renting for $800 and now have to pay $1200 or have to leave their home or lose their home, it&rsquo;s not affordable,&rdquo; Rudyk said.</p><p>He finds himself asking where the line is between redevelopment and gentrification.</p><p>&ldquo;How many new condos are too many? How many Starbucks are too many? So I think there&rsquo;s a tipping point a neighborhood has to reach. What it is? I don&rsquo;t know,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>But not everyone in this neighborhood thinks that tipping point is imminent.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/BC%20gentrification%201.jpg" title="Peggy Mejias stands outside her Belmont Cragin home. Her family was the second Latino household on the block. Although more whites are moving in, she doesn’t think the neighborhood is gentrifying. “These are just average families,” she says. (WBEZ/Susie An)" /></div><p>Peggy Mejias has been living in this house in Belmont Cragin since the 1980s, when home prices were near $50,000. Back then her household was the second Latino family on the block. Over the years she&rsquo;s seen the neighborhood shift from mostly white to mostly brown.</p><p>&ldquo;Now it&rsquo;s more Mexican. But now I&rsquo;m starting to see more Anglos in the area,&rdquo; Mejias said.</p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="320" scrolling="no" src="http://interactive.wbez.org/gentrification/widget/19/" style="float: left; clear: left;" width="400"></iframe></p><p>Mejias says there are more businesses opening up, like a busy laundrymat that she calls &ldquo;nice and expensive&rdquo; and a Dunkin Donuts that&rsquo;s packed in the mornings.</p><p>Then there&rsquo;s the vacant bar near her house. It&rsquo;s been converted into a trendy-looking hot dog eatery that&rsquo;s set to open next month.</p><p>&ldquo;I caught one of the construction guys and he said the person who purchased it, he&rsquo;s been working for him for a long time. He&rsquo;s an investor and he goes into neighborhoods that he sees are up-and-coming. And I walked home thinking, &lsquo;Oh yeah, up-and-coming. Here we go,&rsquo;&rdquo; she said.</p><p>Mejias doubts this shop will be wildly successful. She knows values in the neighborhood are going up, but she considers that normal redevelopment rather than the early signs of gentrification.</p><p>&ldquo;Gentrification is kind of bringing in a completely different class of people. The artistic. Like you see in, West Town, Bucktown when you saw all of that, it was the hipsters. It was all of that. These are just average families,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>That kind of stable growth is the same thing the Northwest Side Housing Center is seeking. It offers things like foreclosure prevention and financial education programs to keep the neighborhood affordable.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/BC%20gentrification%202.jpg" title="Gloria Valencia cooks dinner in her Belmont Cragin home. With the help of the Northwest Side Housing Center, she was able to buy her home last year. (WBEZ/Susie An)" /></div><p>Gloria Valencia took advantage of some of those services by taking a free homeownership class. She then applied for a loan from the Federal Housing Administration that allowed her to buy a four-bedroom house in the neighborhood last year.</p><p>The Northwest Side Housing Center even helped her start a block club.</p><p>&ldquo;We talk about what&rsquo;s going on with our block, our neighborhood and the whole city of Chicago. It could be small things like, &lsquo;I&rsquo;m missing a blue recycling bin&rsquo; to other things that are a little more important to our neighborhood and our block, such as gang violence,&rdquo; Valencia said.</p><p>James Rudyk says affordability doesn&rsquo;t mean housing values have to remain stagnant or that certain people or businesses should stay out.</p><p>&ldquo;If residents on Diversey and Laramie really do want a Starbucks, then let&rsquo;s put in a Starbucks. If they really do want a Trader Joes, then let&rsquo;s put in a Trader Joes. If they&rsquo;re really fine with the fruit market, let&rsquo;s leave the fruit market. So the question is, who makes that decision?,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Rudyk hopes it&rsquo;s the people who live here, and not outside investors. He says that may determine whether Belmont Cragin redevelops or gentrifies.</p><p><em>Susie An is WBEZ&rsquo;s business reporter. Follow her</em><a href="http://twitter.com/triciabobeda"> <em><u>@soosieon</u></em></a><em>.</em></p></p> Tue, 16 Dec 2014 07:37:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/and-coming-area-whats-tipping-point-gentrification-111236