WBEZ | Divorce http://www.wbez.org/tags/divorce Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Divorce in the Philippines http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-01/divorce-philippines-112299 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Brandice%20Schnabel.jpg" style="width: 533px; height: 400px;" title="(Photo: Flickr/Brandice Schnabel)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212845096&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The ongoing Greek debt negotiations</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Greece&rsquo;s prime minister sent a letter to the country&#39;s creditors today saying he was prepared to make new concessions and accept most of a deal that was put forth over the weekend. Greece is expected to hold a referendum this weekend to see whether the Greek public is willing to accept the austerity measures. We discuss the ongoing debt negotiations and the implications for the EU with Gideon Rachman, a columnist with the Financial Times.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/gideonrachman">Gideon Rachman</a> is a columnist with the Financial Times.&nbsp;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212844614&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">World History Moment: the birthday of the automobile</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Friday July 3rd marks the birthday of the first automobile. Worldview resident historian and author of &#39;On This Day in Chicago History&#39;, John Schmidt has the story.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/JRSchmidtPhD">John Schmidt</a> is the author of &#39;On This Day in Chicago History&#39;.&nbsp;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212842759&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Divorce remains illegal in the Phillippines</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Other than Vatican City, the Philippines is the lone holdout among nations when it comes to legalizing divorce. There is a movement to revive failed legislation to allow divorce, but currently in the strongly Catholic country, couples mainly can only dissolve their marriages through annulment. The process is costly financially and in many other ways. Columnist, Ana Santos, found this out firsthand. She shared the struggles of ending her marriage in a recent feature article for The Atlantic titled &ldquo;Ending a Marriage in the Only Country That Bans Divorce.&rdquo; Santos is a former Persephone Miel fellow at the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. She&rsquo;ll talk about the religious, political and societal obstacles to ending the ban on divorce in the Philippines.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/iamAnaSantos">Ana Santos</a> is former Persephone Miel fellow at the&nbsp;Pulitzer&nbsp;Center on Crisis Reporting.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212841969&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The music of Hans Werner Henze</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Global Notes goes classical this week. July 1st would have been the birthday of German composer Hans Werner Henze, a man whose artistic credo was that music should contribute to contemporary society. Henze was a post war modernist who was once criticized for not having enough &ldquo;chaos&rdquo; in his music. Morning Shift and Radio M host Tony Sarabia brings us the music of Henze for our weekly Global Notes.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="https://twitter.com/wbezsarabia">Tony Sarabia</a> is the host of <a href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/118782724828266/?fref=ts">Radio M</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZmorning">WBEZ Morning Shift</a>.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 01 Jul 2015 15:26:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-01/divorce-philippines-112299 Divorce in the Philippines http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-01/divorce-philippines-112300 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Brandice%20Schnabel.jpg" style="width: 533px; height: 400px;" title="(Photo: Flickr/Brandice Schnabel)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212845096&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The ongoing Greek debt negotiations</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Greece&rsquo;s prime minister sent a letter to the country&#39;s creditors today saying he was prepared to make new concessions and accept most of a deal that was put forth over the weekend. Greece is expected to hold a referendum this weekend to see whether the Greek public is willing to accept the austerity measures. We discuss the ongoing debt negotiations and the implications for the EU with Gideon Rachman, a columnist with the Financial Times.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/gideonrachman">Gideon Rachman</a> is a columnist with the Financial Times.&nbsp;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212844614&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">World History Moment: the birthday of the automobile</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Friday July 3rd marks the birthday of the first automobile. Worldview resident historian and author of &#39;On This Day in Chicago History&#39;, John Schmidt has the story.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/JRSchmidtPhD">John Schmidt</a> is the author of &#39;On This Day in Chicago History&#39;.&nbsp;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212842759&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Divorce remains illegal in the Phillippines</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Other than Vatican City, the Philippines is the lone holdout among nations when it comes to legalizing divorce. There is a movement to revive failed legislation to allow divorce, but currently in the strongly Catholic country, couples mainly can only dissolve their marriages through annulment. The process is costly financially and in many other ways. Columnist, Ana Santos, found this out firsthand. She shared the struggles of ending her marriage in a recent feature article for The Atlantic titled &ldquo;Ending a Marriage in the Only Country That Bans Divorce.&rdquo; Santos is a former Persephone Miel fellow at the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. She&rsquo;ll talk about the religious, political and societal obstacles to ending the ban on divorce in the Philippines.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/iamAnaSantos">Ana Santos</a> is former Persephone Miel fellow at the&nbsp;Pulitzer&nbsp;Center on Crisis Reporting.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212841969&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The music of Hans Werner Henze</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Global Notes goes classical this week. July 1st would have been the birthday of German composer Hans Werner Henze, a man whose artistic credo was that music should contribute to contemporary society. Henze was a post war modernist who was once criticized for not having enough &ldquo;chaos&rdquo; in his music. Morning Shift and Radio M host Tony Sarabia brings us the music of Henze for our weekly Global Notes.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="https://twitter.com/wbezsarabia">Tony Sarabia</a> is the host of <a href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/118782724828266/?fref=ts">Radio M</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZmorning">WBEZ Morning Shift</a>.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 01 Jul 2015 15:26:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-01/divorce-philippines-112300 Morning Shift: The state of marriage http://www.wbez.org/morning-shift-state-marriage-109748 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/by firemedic58.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We take a look at the state of the institution of marriage and how divorce could be helping the economy. Plus, the music of Foul Tip.&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-state-of-marriage/embed?header=false" width="100%" height=750 frameborder=no allowtransparency=true></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-state-of-marriage.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-state-of-marriage" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: The state of marriage" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Fri, 21 Feb 2014 09:12:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/morning-shift-state-marriage-109748 Morning Shift: New book offers lessons on surviving infidelity http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-07-02/morning-shift-new-book-offers-lessons-surviving <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Noel_Shush -courtesy of ashleymadison.com_.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Cheating can be a devastating blow to not just your relationship, but your ego as well. How do you pick up the pieces and move on? Also, with the digital age upon us, how do news organizations keep up with the times?&nbsp;</p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-surviving-infidelity.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-surviving-infidelity" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: New book offers lessons on surviving infidelity" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p> Tue, 02 Jul 2013 10:05:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-07-02/morning-shift-new-book-offers-lessons-surviving The ever-changing marriage carousel http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-10/ever-changing-marriage-carousel-103197 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/%28AP%20PhotoMiguel%20Villagran%2CFile%29%20Tom%20and%20Katie.jpg" title="Katie Holmes and Tom Cruise (AP PhotoMiguel Villagran,File)" /></p><p>Growing up in an ethnic/Catholic Chicago neighborhood, divorce simply did not exist. The macabre joke was that the only way out of a marriage was either by death (natural causes) or dismemberment (murder and mayhem). Television in the 1950 and &#39;60s reinforced this marital standard by portraying marriage as a lifelong commitment: <em>The Adventures of&nbsp;Ozzie and Harriet</em> (calm and sturdy); Lucy and Desi from<em> I Love Lucy</em> (frenetic but committed); Rob and Laura from <em>The Dick Van Dyke Show</em> (modern and urbane).</p><p>In todays world much has changed. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the divorce rate of first marriage is around 50 percent; second marriages are at 60 to 67 percent and third marriages are at 73 to 74 pecent. Last February Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes announced they were getting divorced after five years of marriage. The tabloids suggested that the reason for the divorce was a simple one: The couple had entered in a five year contract and time was up! Whether or not this is true, the Cruise/Holmes divorce has sparked a discussion of marriage by contract. Or, as <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/30/fashion/marriage-seen-through-a-contract-lens.html?pagewanted=all&amp;_r=0">the <em>New York Times</em> headline succinctly put it</a>: &ldquo;Till Death, or 20 Years Do Us Part.&rdquo;</p><p>I think that the last 40 years of high divorce rates has forced us, individually and culturally, to rethink divorce &nbsp;and the reasons for getting married in the first place. To begin with, the marriage age is at an all-time high &mdash; 28.7 years for men and 26.5 for women. Part of this, of course, is due to hard economic times. At least part of the reason is that people, especially children of divorced relationships, are simply hesitant to take the plunge. Why make the same mistakes as our parents? Why not just cohabitate? Why not mimic the &#39;90s sitcom <em>Friends</em>? That is, live with your pals well into your 30s and just date around? Why not try to be George Clooney &mdash; keep dating, keep moving? Why get married and stay married unless you really want kids? Why risk living with someone that you might grow to dislike? Why put up with the day to day banalities of domestic existence? Why risk being unhappy? Why risk the &ldquo;change partner and dance&rdquo; divorce carousel? After all, everybody knows that it&rsquo;s almost impossible to get like, lust, and love in one relationship. So why bother?</p><p>OK, I admit it &mdash; I&rsquo;m an incurable romantic. Yes, divorce is scary. Yes, the statistics seem to be stacked against success. But, the real purpose behind marriage, partnership and commitment is the deep-set need to love and be loved in return. Psychologists tell us that we only know ourselves when we try to know and be empathetic with another. Love is not always a &ldquo;splendid thing&rdquo; but it is a necessary ingredient in the life process. So, yes love sometime makes fools of us. Yes, sometimes we are hurt and wind up hurting others. But we are human beings, and we need intimacy and we crave affection.</p><p>I think marriage will change, and must change. And, I hope the divorce rate will change as well for the better, of course. Maybe we will move to contract marriages, or short-term renewable marriages. I&rsquo;m not sure, but I am sure that the need and desire for intimacy and love are an elemental part of the human condition.</p><p><em>Al Gini is a Professor of Business Ethics and Chairman of the Management Department in the Quinlan School of Business at Loyola University Chicago.</em></p></p> Tue, 23 Oct 2012 09:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-10/ever-changing-marriage-carousel-103197