WBEZ | hazing http://www.wbez.org/tags/hazing Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Morning Shift: Examining politicians' self-made narrative http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-09/morning-shift-examining-politicians-self-made <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Cover boots Flickr wormwould.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Politicians love reminding voters of their humble beginnings. We dissect the &quot;bootstrap&quot; narrative. We also hear about Norse mythology from an unlikely source.&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-examining-the-bootstrap-narrative/embed?header=false" width="100%" height=750 frameborder=no allowtransparency=true></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-examining-the-bootstrap-narrative.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-examining-the-bootstrap-narrative" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Examining politicians' self-made narrative" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Wed, 09 Apr 2014 08:43:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-09/morning-shift-examining-politicians-self-made Hazing incident revealed at Plano High School http://www.wbez.org/news/hazing-incident-revealed-plano-high-school-108572 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/flickr_football_trevor manternach.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Another school in the Chicago region is tackling its own hazing scandal. Members of suburban Plano High School&rsquo;s football and basketball teams were arrested this week for allegedly sexually assaulting some of their teammates. The incidents took place in August 2012 to February of this year.</p><p>Dr. Eleazar Eusebio with the Chicago School of Professional Psychology said hazing rituals can be similar to bullying, but hazed students are likely to keep quiet and carry on the practice as a right of passage.</p><p>He said some students may feel that if it&rsquo;s something they experienced, they have the right to do it to others.</p><p>&ldquo;It seems as if we&rsquo;ve given hazing a little more of a permission in some ways to exist from our own understanding of rights of passages; for example, sororities, fraternities, the military, sports teams,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Eusebio said hazing traditions may start out with something innocuous, but over time the tradition can get twisted to the point where people become physically and emotionally harmed.</p><p>He said rarely does the victim come forward to report the problem. Usually, it&rsquo;s someone not involved who happens to find out about the practice.</p><p>Eusebio said schools should put strict anti-hazing policies in place. He said schools could also implement other team building programs to build leadership in healthy ways.</p><p>The Plano School District said it&rsquo;s increasing supervision and altering locker room procedures as well as opening a student safety phone line.</p><p>Earlier this week, another student has come forward in the Maine West High School hazing scandal. The student&rsquo;s filed a lawsuit alleging he was sexually assaulted in a soccer team hazing incident.</p></p> Fri, 30 Aug 2013 11:31:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/hazing-incident-revealed-plano-high-school-108572 After hazing, one high school's story http://www.wbez.org/news/after-hazing-one-high-schools-story-104773 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/GBN.jpg" style="height: 184px; width: 680px;" title="(Becky Vevea/WBEZ)" /></p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F74150373" width="95%"></iframe></p><p>Suburban Maine West High School is working through the school year under a cloud of outside investigation and internal questions around allegations of hazing on some of its sports teams.</p><p>Those questions include what the school staff knew about the alleged hazing and whether enough was done to stop it.</p><p>Ten years ago, another suburban Chicago high school saw a tradition take a turn for the worse&mdash;prompting many of the same questions.</p><p>WBEZ&rsquo;s Becky Vevea spoke with school leaders at Glenbrook North High School about how they&rsquo;ve worked to rebuild.<br /><br />&ldquo;The story is powerfully recorded on video tape,&rdquo; Paula Zahn said at the beginning of a CNN report. It was 2003 and YouTube didn&rsquo;t even exist.</p><p>Still, the images made national headlines, girls in yellow jerseys throwing paint, mud and grime at another group sitting in a circle. It was a tradition gone wrong. The junior girls versus senior girls in what was supposed to be a powder puff football game.</p><p>It rocked the Northbrook community and left a stubborn mark on the school.</p><p>&ldquo;People were like, &lsquo;Oh you went to Glenbrook North, like, that&rsquo;s the hazing school.&rsquo; That&rsquo;s how everyone had heard about it,&rdquo; said Marly Schuman, a 2006 Glenbrook North graduate. I went to journalism school with Schuman and met her for coffee recently.</p><p>Even when she moved away to college, she tells me the hazing is what people knew about. Not Glenbrook&rsquo;s great academics or the championship basketball program or the decorated debate team.</p><p>It&rsquo;s now been a decade since the news trucks left and the messy lawsuits were settled.</p><p>School leaders say in some ways they&rsquo;ve become a stronger school and community &ndash;but they say that&rsquo;s because they confronted hazing head on.</p><p>&ldquo;Our realization was everyone in the community contributes to what we are, and for what this high school is,&rdquo; said Mike Riggle, superintendent of the Glenbrooks. He was principal of Glenbrook North in 2003.</p><p>Riggle says administrators and teachers scrutinized school culture. They eliminated any club that didn&rsquo;t have an official advisor, banned the tradition of &ldquo;toilet-papering&rdquo; houses, and wouldn&rsquo;t allow any negative chanting or cheering at games.</p><p>&ldquo;What we wanted to do is to make sure that the groups that were formed here were strong, healthy, vibrant, but any initiation or ritual that they had as part of their function was positive and healthy,&rdquo; Riggle said.</p><p>They launched all-school workshops to bring students together. Recently, one of those workshops morphed into a regular event called Spartans Connect. Ryan Bretag is a technology coordinator at Glenbrook North and he helps organize it.</p><p>It&rsquo;s a day, Bretag said, designed almost like a professional conference, where kids have a chance to take classes like yoga and Harry Potterology. The idea is to get them outside those cliquey teenage comfort zones.</p><p>But Bretag said the event alone isn&rsquo;t a cure-all, because at the end of the day, like anything in education, the work is never done.</p><p>&ldquo;Every year you have, 400 or 500 new students coming in, so it&rsquo;s not just changing it, it&rsquo;s growing it,&rdquo; said Bretag. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s possible that something could happen, but our focus of being aware is much sharper.&rdquo;</p><p>School culture is a difficult thing to change&mdash;in any school&mdash;and it only takes a day or a single group to derail it. Even in inner city Chicago, schools grapple with creating a healthy school climate and are constantly challenged by violence and poverty.</p><p>But it&rsquo;s a challenge also for a place like Glenbrook North or other suburban schools, in part because those communities are so deeply invested in the public schools and play a big role in setting the tone academically, athletically, and culturally.</p><p>In countless hazing cases, often the first question asked is what the school knew about what was going on. But schools find themselves in a muddy place when it comes to bullying and hazing, especially in today&rsquo;s digital world, where they have to be aware of more than just what goes on inside the walls of the school.&nbsp;</p><p>Administrators can get flak for making change, like Glenbrook did when it tried to ban toilet-papering. After all, everyone does it and what&rsquo;s the harm in draping toilet paper over other people&rsquo;s trees?<br />That kind of resistance is not unusual, according to Susan Lipkins, a psychologist and expert in hazing and bullying.</p><p>&ldquo;These traditions, like Freshman Friday, often are integrated not only into the school, but into the community,&rdquo; Lipkins said. &ldquo;And oftentimes parents do know what&rsquo;s going on and they often have experienced it themselves and they feel like it&rsquo;s not so bad, it&rsquo;s a learning experience, it&rsquo;s fun, boys will be boys, it&rsquo;s going to make you tougher. And so they consciously and unconsciously support the hazing.&rdquo;</p><p>Lipkins said hazing happens everywhere in society, even in the workplace, where there&rsquo;s a pecking order and the new workers get jobs no one else wants to do.</p><p>It&rsquo;s common for teenagers to model that behavior, she added, but in an increasingly competitive culture, where academic, professional and athletic performance reigns, it can morph into something more harmful and abusive.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;Everybody feels that pressure to compete and excel, the students, the teachers, the administration, the parents, and we need to stop, take a deep breath and look at our culture and say what are we doing?&rdquo; Lipkins said. &ldquo;And what are the effects of this kind of competition?&rdquo;</p><p>As Glenbrook found, the effects of competition and &ldquo;seniority&rdquo; getting out of control, can be damaging for a long time.</p><p>&ldquo;This fall we were in a presentation, we were talking about school climate and the example that they used was the hazing that occurred here, in 2003, nine years ago,&rdquo; said Paul Pryma, Glenbrook North&rsquo;s current principal. &ldquo;There have been thousands of other examples, that&rsquo;s one that has kind of been etched and it hurts us each time that that comes up. Because in our minds, we&rsquo;ve addressed it, we&rsquo;re continuing to evolve, and yet every once and a while you&rsquo;re reminded on a Google search or whatever it might be something that caused a lot of pain.&rdquo;</p><p>For Maine West High School, that reality may only be beginning to sink in. &nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 08 Jan 2013 13:43:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/after-hazing-one-high-schools-story-104773 School board votes to terminate Maine West coach amid hazing allegations http://www.wbez.org/news/school-board-votes-terminate-maine-west-coach-amid-hazing-allegations-104516 <p><p><b id="internal-source-marker_0.0068149082362651825" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">A suburban high school soccer coach still has the support of his former players and students.</span></b></p><p><b id="internal-source-marker_0.0068149082362651825" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">That&rsquo;s after the Board of Education for Maine Township High School District 207 unanimously voted Wednesday night to fire him. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></b></p><p><b id="internal-source-marker_0.0068149082362651825" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Michael Divincenzo is one of two coaches named in a recent hazing lawsuit. The lawsuit alleges that Divincenzo, other coaches and school staff were aware of a hazing ritual on the Maine West varsity soccer team that led to the sexual assault of four boys. </span></b></p><p><b id="internal-source-marker_0.0068149082362651825" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">A number of former players and students from Maine West High School wrote on a Facebook page created in support of Divincenzo, saying the coach is being made a scapegoat.</span><br /><b id="internal-source-marker_0.0068149082362651825" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">&nbsp;</span></b><br /><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Tony Romanucci, the lawyer for the alleged victims, said he wouldn&rsquo;t be surprised if others are let go.</span></b></p><p><b style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">&quot;I&#39;m going to give the school board the benefit of the doubt that they&#39;re not finished with their investigation yet and that Coach Divincenzo was the first to fall,&quot; Romanucci said.</span></b></p><p><b style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">In a written statement, school board president Sean Sullivan said the termination vote does not mean the board agrees with the allegations in the lawsuit.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Divincenzo, who is also a tenured gym teahcer, has 17 days to appeal the board&rsquo;s decision with the Illinois State Board of Education.</span></b></p><p><b style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Since the allegations surfaced, Maine West has taken several steps to prevent hazing, including having all althletes sign an anti-hazing pledge.</span></b></p></p> Thu, 20 Dec 2012 17:14:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/school-board-votes-terminate-maine-west-coach-amid-hazing-allegations-104516 13 surrender in Illinois fraternity drinking death http://www.wbez.org/news/13-surrender-illinois-fraternity-drinking-death-104464 <p><p>About half of the 22 fraternity members charged with hazing after a pledge died following a night of heavy drinking in Illinois had turned themselves in as of Tuesday night, police said.</p><p>Members of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity were charged after an investigation into the Nov. 2 death of NIU freshman David Bogenberger, 19. He was found unresponsive at the fraternity house in DeKalb, the community about 65 miles west of Chicago that&#39;s home to Northern Illinois University. The DeKalb County Coroner&#39;s Office said toxicology results found his blood alcohol content was about five times the legal limit for driving.</p><p>Police Lt. Jason Leverton said the DeKalb Police Department has seen other hazing incidents in the past, but they typically have involved a handful of people suspected of hazing one or two others. He said this case was different because of the number of people &mdash; both pledges and fraternity members &mdash; believed to have been involved.</p><p>&quot;This is something we haven&#39;t quite seen before,&quot; Leverton said.</p><p>The coroner ruled Bogenberger&#39;s cause of death was cardiac arrhythmia, with alcohol intoxication as a contributing cause.</p><p>The DeKalb Police Department said its investigation found about 19 pledges, including Bogenberger, attended the Nov. 1 event. Police said the event was referred to as &quot;Parent&#39;s Night&quot; because pledges were assigned &quot;Greek dads and moms&quot; &mdash; upperclassmen and women from the fraternity and associated sororities &mdash; who served as mentors. Several pledges besides Bogenberger reported getting sick and passing out, according to police.</p><p>&quot;The event that night involved the pledges rotating between several rooms in the fraternity house, being asked a series of questions, and then being provided cups of vodka and other liquor to drink,&quot; police said in a statement. &quot;This resulted in the pledges drinking a large quantity of alcohol in about a two-hour time period.&quot;</p><p>Leverton said pledges were told to drink regardless of whether they answered questions correctly.</p><p>Five men face charges of felony hazing; police say those men were most involved in the planning of the event. The 17 others face misdemeanor hazing charges.</p><p>Of the 13 men to surrender so far, seven did so in DeKalb. Leverton said those seven posted bond and were released. He said he didn&#39;t know if the others, who turned themselves in to police in other communities, also had posted bond.</p><p>In a statement Monday, Bogenberger&#39;s family called on college administrators and fraternity officials to help put an end to hazing and other &quot;initiation rituals.&quot;</p><p>NIU said 31 students are accused of violating the school&#39;s code of conduct. Those students could face penalties ranging from reprimand to expulsion.</p><p>University officials also said they work with fraternities and sororities to educate members about the risks of drinking, blood alcohol content, responsible drinking, signs of intoxication and alcohol poisoning. Training is held at the start of the academic year for members of the Greek community, and more than half of an organization&#39;s members must participate in a training session in order to hold a social event that includes alcohol.</p><p>NIU policy requires fraternities and sororities to register social events and get university approval. The university said Pi Kappa Alpha leaders did not officially register the Nov. 1 event with NIU or the fraternity&#39;s national chapter.</p><p>The international fraternity suspended the local chapter and said it would cooperate in the investigation. In a statement from its Memphis, Tenn., headquarters, the fraternity said it has &quot;strict standards with respect to alcohol and hazing.&quot;</p></p> Wed, 19 Dec 2012 08:07:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/13-surrender-illinois-fraternity-drinking-death-104464 Illinois frat members charged in student hazing death http://www.wbez.org/news/illinois-frat-members-charged-student-hazing-death-104438 <p><p>DEKALB, Ill. &mdash; Nearly two dozen fraternity members at Northern Illinois University have been charged with hazing-related counts after a freshman was found dead at their fraternity house following a night of drinking.</p><p>DeKalb police and prosecutors issued arrest warrants Monday for 22 members of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity in DeKalb. Five members are charged with felony hazing, while the other 17 members are facing misdemeanor hazing charges.</p><p>The warrants were filed after David Bogenberger, 19, was found unresponsive at the fraternity house early on Nov. 2. The DeKalb County Coroner&#39;s Office said toxicology results found his blood alcohol content was about five times the legal limit for driving.</p><p>The coroner ruled Bogenberger&#39;s cause of death was cardiac arrhythmia, with alcohol intoxication as a contributing cause.</p><p>The DeKalb Police Department said its investigation found the fraternity hosted an unsanctioned event on Nov. 1 that wasn&#39;t registered with the university or the fraternity&#39;s national chapter.</p><p>&quot;The event that night involved the pledges rotating between several rooms in the fraternity house, being asked a series of questions, and then being provided cups of vodka and other liquor to drink,&quot; police said in a statement. &quot;This resulted in the pledges drinking a large quantity of alcohol in about a two-hour time period.&quot;</p><p>Police said several other pledges reported getting sick and passing out due to excessive alcohol consumption.</p><p>The international fraternity suspended the local Eta Nu chapter and said it would cooperate with the pursuit of anyone who broke the law.</p><p>In a statement from its Memphis, Tenn., headquarters, the fraternity sought to distance itself from alcohol use and hazing that might have happened at its local chapter. It said it has &quot;strict standards with respect to alcohol and hazing.&quot;</p><p>&quot;It is these local activities which stray from the fraternity&#39;s mission and values,&quot; Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity Vice President Justin Buck said.</p><p>In addition to the charges, NIU said 31 students are accused of violating the school&#39;s code of conduct. Those students could face penalties ranging from reprimand to expulsion.</p><p>Bogenberger&#39;s family said in a statement that they appreciate law enforcement professionals who investigated his death and &quot;seek accountability for a horrible event.&quot;</p><p>&quot;We have no desire for revenge,&quot; the family said. &quot;Rather, we hope that some significant change will come from David&#39;s death. Alcohol poisoning claims far too many young, healthy lives.</p><p>&quot;We must realize that young people can and do die in hazing rituals. Alcohol-involved hazing and initiation must end.&quot;</p></p> Tue, 18 Dec 2012 08:11:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/illinois-frat-members-charged-student-hazing-death-104438 More families join hazing lawsuit against suburban school district http://www.wbez.org/news/more-families-join-hazing-lawsuit-against-suburban-school-district-104097 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/mother.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Three plaintiffs have joined a civil lawsuit involving alleged hazing at Maine West High School in suburban Des Plaines.<br /><br />The four students are accusing coaches and school officials of allowing some students from the baseball and soccer teams to subject other players to physical and sexual abuse. The three students who joined the suit yesterday are members of the baseball and soccer teams.</p><p>The lawsuit was filed last week against Maine Township High School District 207 on behalf of a 14-year-old student who said last September older members of the team ripped off his clothes, grabbed his genitals and sodomized him with objects.&nbsp;</p><p>Attorney Tony Romanucci said he believes such incidents have been going on for some time at Maine Township.</p><p>&ldquo;I can tell you &hellip;we may be able to bring this back now to 2006,&rdquo; Romanucci said. &ldquo;So many people have come forward based upon what we have so far. I am having a hard time keeping up with all the phone calls.&rdquo;</p><p>He also said that he received information about so-called hazing in the swimming and water polo programs.&nbsp;</p><p>One of the alleged victims&#39; mothers appeared at a press conference on Wednesday wearing sunglasses and a baseball hat.&nbsp; She refused to give her identity and said that she gave a letter to the school complaining about abuse of her son in 2008. &nbsp;A copy of the letter was presented at the press conference. According to her, the Maine West High School principal, Audrey Haugan, did not investigate the incident at the time.<br /><br />She said this year she also talked to school district Superintendent Kenneth Wallace after she learned about the allegations from last September.<br /><br />&ldquo;He told me that in order to be sexual assault there needed to be sexual gratification and I was wrong,&rdquo; the mother said. &ldquo;I told him that my son was pinned down, pants ripped off exposed, boxers completely ripped off, in my opinion that&rsquo;s a sexual assault.&rdquo;<br /><br />In a statement, Maine Township School District said it first heard of the 2008 incident this month. That&rsquo;s shortly after allegations involving hazing this year caused uproar.</p><p>The district said it was not aware of the correspondence between the mother and the school four years ago.</p><p>&ldquo;That incident, involving members of West&rsquo;s freshman baseball team, came to the attention of Superintendent Dr. Kenneth Wallace on November 16, 2012, at which time it was reported to the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services,&rdquo; according to the statement from Maine Township High School District 207.<br /><br />The district said it already made a report with the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services and that it&rsquo;s working with the Des Plaines police, who are investigating<br /><br />Six students were charged as juveniles with misdemeanor battery and hazing after the September attack, and 10 students were disciplined.</p></p> Thu, 29 Nov 2012 05:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/more-families-join-hazing-lawsuit-against-suburban-school-district-104097