WBEZ | Illinois prisons http://www.wbez.org/tags/illinois-prisons Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en After 8 months Quinn still won't discuss prison policy with WBEZ http://www.wbez.org/news/after-8-months-quinn-still-wont-discuss-prison-policy-wbez-105566 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/RS3064_AP100113026742-Seth-Perlman-2010-SOS(1).jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Monday marks exactly eight months since WBEZ requested an interview with Governor Pat Quinn to discuss prison policy. He has steadfastly refused.</p><p>The request started in June of last year when WBEZ asked Quinn to explain his decision to keep reporters out of the prison system.</p><p>WBEZ has reported extensively on deteriorating conditions, poor health care, unmonitored contracts, and Quinn&rsquo;s plans to close prisons at a time of historic overcrowding. Last week his administration announced plans to start housing prisoners in gymnasiums at six already overcrowded facilities. A prison watchdog group has sharply criticized that move saying the administration doesn&rsquo;t seem to have a plan to ensure that it won&rsquo;t become the new status quo.</p><p>Over the last eight months, WBEZ has repeatedly asked Quinn to come on-air and explain his prison policies and plans, and has made clear to his press office that it is a standing request. That request continues to be denied.</p></p> Mon, 18 Feb 2013 04:38:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/after-8-months-quinn-still-wont-discuss-prison-policy-wbez-105566 Jury awards $12 million to family of man denied medicine in Illinois prison http://www.wbez.org/news/jury-awards-12-million-family-man-denied-medicine-illinois-prison-105032 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/ray fox family.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>A Chicago jury awarded $12 million on Friday to the family of a man whose family said he did not get proper medical attention while in a state prison.</p><p>Ray Fox was in Stateville prison in 2007 when he had a brain aneurysm. His attorneys said that aneurysm happened because Fox wasn&rsquo;t provided his anti-seizure medicine for days, even though he&rsquo;d been calling out for it.</p><p>The 50-year-old Fox now needs constant, around-the-clock medical attention, which he gets from his mom, Rose Fox.</p><p>&ldquo;You trust the system to take care of your loved ones and then they abuse them,&rdquo; Rose said after the verdict. &ldquo;And that&rsquo;s terrible. &nbsp;What happened to Ray should never happen.&rdquo;</p><p>During the week-long trial, jurors heard testimony from Trisha Fox, Ray&rsquo;s daughter. She said since his aneurysm, her father sometimes pounds on his chest uncontrollably, has trouble walking and going to the bathroom and gets aggressive.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s about the psychology of not seeing the human portion of the people that are incarcerated for any number of reasons,&rdquo; said Michael Kanovitz, Fox&rsquo;s attorney. &ldquo;Most people, if they break a law and they have to go to prison, they are there to pay their debt to society. It is not right to injure them in a way that will follow them for the rest of their life.&rdquo;</p><p>The Fox family sued several parties that provide health care services in Illinois&rsquo; prisons.&nbsp;Most settled out of court. &nbsp;Two who did not were David Barnes and Michael Borkowski,&nbsp;medical technicians who delivered medicine to inmates. They are represented by attorneys with the Illinois Attorney General&rsquo;s office.</p><p>Those attorneys argued it&rsquo;s not clear Fox had seizures that caused his debilitating aneurysm.</p></p> Fri, 18 Jan 2013 16:18:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/jury-awards-12-million-family-man-denied-medicine-illinois-prison-105032 Lawsuit: Prison officials could have prevented massive brain damage http://www.wbez.org/news/lawsuit-prison-officials-could-have-prevented-massive-brain-damage-104919 <p><p>Testimony is scheduled to resume Tuesday in a trial over medical care in the Illinois prisons.<br /><br />In 2007, while at Stateville prison, Ray Fox had an aneurysm. Because of the brain damage he suffered, he now requires care 24 hours a day. His elderly parents bathe him, help him walk and change his diapers. The parents are now suing two medical technicians who worked at the Stateville prison.<br /><br />At the time of his incarceration Fox was on Dilantin, a drug that controlled his seizures, and his prescription had run out. An inmate who was in the next cell told attorneys that he heard Fox pleading for days with correctional officers and medical staffers to get him more of his medication. Medical records show the levels of Dilantin were very low in Fox&#39;s body when he was rushed to the hospital. Attorneys say it was a series of seizures over several days that led to Fox&rsquo;s devastating aneurysm.<br /><br />Attorneys for the two prison workers say they&rsquo;re not responsible because they provided very little care to Fox, and there&rsquo;s very little documentation in the medical records to connect them to the case at all.</p></p> Tue, 15 Jan 2013 05:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/lawsuit-prison-officials-could-have-prevented-massive-brain-damage-104919