WBEZ | reparations http://www.wbez.org/tags/reparations Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Morning Shift: Interviews for Burge reparations underway http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-06-30/morning-shift-interviews-burge-reparations-underway-112285 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/burge.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212655719&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">We may never know exactly how many people were tortured on the watch of former Chicago Police Department commander Jon Burge and his deputies. But two legal minds have been trying to make an honest accounting of what happened and to whom. Daniel Coyne is a clinical professor at IIT Chicago-Kent School of Law. When Chicago&rsquo;s City Council voted in April to authorize a historic $5.5 million reparations package for Burge victims, Coyne was tapped to figure out who is eligible for compensation. He&rsquo;s already reviewed a couple dozen applications. And David Yellen is the dean of Loyola University Chicago School of Law. Since March 2014, he&rsquo;s been the court-appointed special master in charge of reviewing possible Burge torture victims who are still in prison. We talk to them both.</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><a href="https://www.kentlaw.iit.edu/faculty/full-time-faculty/daniel-t-coyne">Daniel Coyne</a> is clinical professor at IIT Chicago-Kent School of Law</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><a href="http://www.luc.edu/law/faculty/yellen.shtml">David Yellen</a> is Dean of the Loyola University Chicago School of Law</p></p> Tue, 30 Jun 2015 11:32:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-06-30/morning-shift-interviews-burge-reparations-underway-112285 Week in Review: Illinois pension law, Adolfo Davis resentencing, reparations package for torture victims http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-08/week-review-illinois-pension-law-adolfo-davis-resentencing <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Flickr%20John%20Ashley.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="(Photo: Flickr/John Ashley)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204572043&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Week in Review: Illinois pension law, Adolfo Davis resentencing, reparations package for torture victims</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">We wrap up this week&rsquo;s biggest news headlines&nbsp;<span id="docs-internal-guid-ee858718-3548-38bf-4539-2469c96e29fb">with NPR reporter David Schaper and Jon Hansen of DNAinfo Chicago. We discuss the Illinois pension reform law which has been ruled unconstitutional by the Illinois Supreme Court; the historic reparations package for torture victims of former Chicago Police commander Jon Burge; the resentencing of Cook County inmate Adolfo Davis; and, the Chicago Blackhawks sweep the Minnesota Wild in the race for the Stanley Cup. </span><br /><br /><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-ee858718-3548-38bf-4539-2469c96e29fb"><a href="https://twitter.com/davidschaperNPR">David Schaper</a></span> is a NPR National Desk reporter based in Chicago.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-ee858718-3548-38bf-4539-2469c96e29fb"><a href="https://twitter.com/jonthecubsfan">Jon Hansen</a></span> is the Radio News Director for DNAinfo Chicago.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204571585&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Friday Mini Mix featuring DJ Duane Powell</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-ee858718-354a-20f8-83be-c250f9829e36">Every Friday we bring you a brand new mix from the Vocalo DJ Collective, curated by DJ Jesse De La Pena. Today&rsquo;s set comes from DJ Duane Powell and features Bossa Nova, R&amp;B and Neo Soul.</span><br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/soundrotation">Duane Powell</a> is a Chicago-based DJ.</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204580013&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Oak Park record store a symbol of community</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-ee858718-3575-143d-a94c-5f5695a9875b">We&rsquo;re wrapping up Small Business Week with a look at one final local business from around the Chicagoland area. The music industry has suffered greatly in the last few decades and the rise of the mp3 has hit the retail end of the business hard. But at least one refuge for crate diggers and music lovers is still standing strong. Val&rsquo;s halla Records in Oak Park is celebrating its 43rd anniversary at the end of July. Val&rsquo;s halla owner, &nbsp;Val Camilletti joins us with her story. </span><br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Val Camilletti is owner of <a href="https://twitter.com/ValshallaRecord">Val&rsquo;s halla Records</a>.</em></p></div><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204579867&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">New festival highlights literary scene in Evanston</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-ee858718-3576-4e16-5915-d68527a3a7e0">The first annual Evanston Literary Festival begins Monday, May 11. It&rsquo;s a week-long celebration of the literary scene in Evanston with events taking place throughout the city. Award-winning Chicago author and Distinguished Writer in Residence at Northwestern University, &nbsp;Stuart Dybek, will be there to help get things started. We use the opportunity to check in with the celebrated Chicago writer.</span><br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong><em> <a href="http://www.english.northwestern.edu/people/dybek.html">Stuart Dybek</a> is an award-winning Chicago author and Distinguished Writer in Residence at Northwestern University.</em></p></div><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204580595&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Tech Shift: Uber makes moves, Mayor Emanuel pushes for Chicago taxi app, and unicorns!</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-ee858718-3577-a1fd-b2a2-3aafb4425734">Uber is in the market for a new mapping system and sets sights on Nokia&rsquo;s digital mapping service. Meanwhile, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel wants a universal taxi app for Chicago cabbies to compete with ridesharing services like Uber. We discuss some of the week&rsquo;s biggest tech stories with Justin Massa of Food Genius and Wailin Wong, editor and writer for </span>The Distance.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-ee858718-3577-a1fd-b2a2-3aafb4425734">Guests:</span></strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><a href="https://twitter.com/justinmassa">Justin Massa</a> is the founder &amp; President of Food Genius.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-ee858718-3577-a1fd-b2a2-3aafb4425734"><a href="https://twitter.com/velocitywong">Wailin Wong</a></span> is Senior Editor for The Distance.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204579727&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Police set up DUI checkpoints in mostly minority neighborhoods</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-ee858718-3579-d9e0-9278-d88dcfc2e172">According to a recent </span>Chicago Tribune investigation that looks at checkpoints all over the city, Chicago police set up more DUI checkpoints in predominantly black and Latino neighborhoods than white neighborhoods. Angela Caputo is the investigative reporter that worked on the story and she joins us with details.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-ee858718-3579-d9e0-9278-d88dcfc2e172">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/angelatcr">Angela Caputo</a> is a Chicago Tribune reporter.</em></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204580358&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Illinois Supreme Court rules pension reform unconstitutional</span></font></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-ee858718-357b-24d4-7315-645265a6e5bd">Illinois must continue to pay for the pensions of state workers despite the fact that the program is $105 billion in debt. That was the outcome of the May 8 Illinois Supreme Court ruling that found the state&rsquo;s 2013 pension law unconstitutional. The law sought to delay the retirement age for some workers, limit the salary used to determine pension benefits, and scale back cost-of-living increases. For now, none of that will happen. The unanimous decision means lawmakers and the governor head back to the drawing board to find a way to solve the state&rsquo;s pension crisis, which is the worst in the nation. WBEZ&rsquo;s Tony Arnold covers Statehouse politics in Illinois. We also get reactions from joined Dan Montgomery of the Illinois Federation of Teachers and </span>Laurence Msall of the Civic Federation.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-ee858718-357b-24d4-7315-645265a6e5bd">Guests: </span></strong><ul><li><em><a href="https://twitter.com/tonyjarnold">Tony Arnold</a> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></li><li><em><a href="https://www.ift-aft.org/your-union/leadership/president">Dan Montgomery</a> is president of the Illinois Federation of Teachers.</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.civicfed.org/civic-federation/staff/laurence-msall">Laurence Msall</a> is President of the Civic Federation.</em></li></ul></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 08 May 2015 15:37:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-08/week-review-illinois-pension-law-adolfo-davis-resentencing Afternoon Shift: A myth, the risks and some medical tips this allergy season http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-06/afternoon-shift-myth-risks-and-some-medical-tips-allergy-season <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Lis%20Ferla.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="(Photo: Flickr/Lis Ferla)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204248925&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Spring brings allergy season</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span id="docs-internal-guid-94b9b5a5-25d9-cc98-b2ea-ac76c28fec12" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">I</span><span id="docs-internal-guid-87864bdb-2b3a-1159-17d8-124a021e5bfa">t&rsquo;s allergy season and that means sore throats, itchy eyes, runny noses, and headaches. We know. Today we are here to help! We&rsquo;re taking your questions about allergies and debunking an odd home remedy. </span><br /><br /><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><a href="https://twitter.com/mitchmd">Dr. Mitchell Grayson</a> is an Allergist/Immunologist and Principal Investigator at the Medical College of Wisconsin&rsquo;s Grayson Lab.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-87864bdb-2b3a-1159-17d8-124a021e5bfa">Dr. Baiju Malde is Doctor of Allergy and Immunology at </span><a href="http://www.nm.org/location/northwestern-memorial-hospital?utm_source=nmh.org&amp;utm_medium=redirect&amp;utm_campaign=nmh.org">Northwestern Medicine</a>.</em></li><li><em><a href="http://doctors.rush.edu/directory/profile.asp?setsize=10&amp;pict_id=3729625">Dr. Chris Codispoti</a> is Associate Professor of Allergy and Immunology at Rush University Medical Center.</em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204248931&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Chicago chef defines Southern cooking</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span id="docs-internal-guid-94b9b5a5-25d9-cc98-b2ea-ac76c28fec12" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">For</span><span id="docs-internal-guid-87864bdb-2b3d-ec51-73bc-1e809e3ad727">&nbsp;this installment in our week of small business conversations, we&rsquo;re looking to Andersonville where the Southern style approach of Chicago&#39;s Big Jones restaurant is about history and geography as much as it is about the food. Chef Paul Fehribach takes inspiration from home-cooking traditions stretching from Southern Indiana to the Appalachian highlands to the Carolina coast. He joins us to discuss the evolution of Big Jones and the brand new book, </span><em>The Big Jones Cookbook</em>.</p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-87864bdb-2b3d-ec51-73bc-1e809e3ad727"><strong>Guest:</strong><em> </em></span><em><a href="https://twitter.com/PaulFehribach">Paul Fehribach</a> is Executive Chef and co-owner of Big Jones and author of The Big Jones Cookbook.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204249965&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">The Bulls and Blackhawks dominate the playoffs so far</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The &#39;Hawks won big with a crushing defeat against the Minnesota Wild in game 3 of the second round of Stanley Cup playoffs. And, the Bulls are up 1 game to zip as they head to Cleveland for game 2 in the Eastern Conference. WBEZ sports contributor Cheryl Raye-Stout joins us to talk &lsquo;Hawks and Bulls.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-87864bdb-2b3f-e154-894e-6f97ab62a8d6">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/Crayestout">Cheryl Raye-Stout</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s sports contributor.&nbsp;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204250043&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Debate on eating meat takes over government public comment page</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span id="docs-internal-guid-87864bdb-2b42-eeed-e3f8-9148a95ba7de">It is getting down to the wire to weigh in on new USDA Dietary Guidelines. The period of public input ends on Friday May 8. A major debate this year is whether or not eating less meat is good for your health and the environment. Pro- and anti-meat factions have been duking it out on the public comments page of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. Recently, a group of meat and dairy alternatives companies (including two from Chicago) added their voice to the thousands of comments that advocate decreasing animal products. Leading that coalition is Oakland-based food attorney Michele Simon who joins us with more.</span><br /><br /><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-87864bdb-2b43-410d-93a8-98a4809717ea">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="http://www.foodlawfirm.com/attorneys/michele-simon/">Michele Simon</a> is an attorney at the Food Law Firm.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204251239&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Tech Shift: Physicists theorize that reality is a 2-D hologram</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Physicists around the world are theorizing that reality as we know it may just be one big hologram. That means, the 3-D objects you see around you aren&rsquo;t actually 3-dimensional. At the moment, this is just an idea. But a team of physicists and researchers at Fermilab are conducting an experiment to try to find evidence that such a theory is possible. Joining us to explain is Craig Hogan, Director of the Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics and professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-87864bdb-2b44-57f2-c5c7-6ac73081eb72">Guest:&nbsp;</span></strong><em><a href="https://astro.uchicago.edu/people/craig-j-hogan.php">Craig Hogan</a> is Director of the Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics and a professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago.&nbsp;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204250141&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Competition driving down prices of parking in Chicago</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Chicago has some of the highest parking rates in the country. A metered spot downtown can cost as much as $6.50 an hour. The hourly rate for a garage can be even pricier. But more parking apps are making it easier to find a cheaper spot, including ParkWhiz which now offers spots in high demand areas for 15-dollars for the day. WBEZ&rsquo;s Susie An has been looking into the cost of driving downtown and she joins us with details.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-87864bdb-2b46-9969-9d10-9954b4054dec">Guest: </span></strong><a href="https://twitter.com/soosieon"><em>Susie An</em></a><em> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204250269&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Jury finds Chicago man guilty in murder of police officer</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">A guilty verdict has been reached in the Timothy Herring trial. Herring was accused of killing Chicago police officer Michael Flisk and ex-Chicago Housing Authority officer Stephen Peters in 2010. The jury took almost 8 hours to convict Herring of both murders and burglary. He&rsquo;ll now spend the rest of his life behind bars. WBEZ&rsquo;s Yolanda Perdomo covered the trial and was there when the verdict was read.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-87864bdb-2b48-219a-eaf9-c9d330ab4e92">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/yolandanews">Yolanda Perdomo</a> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204250421&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Outgoing City Council members meet for the last time</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Well it was a busy, busy day at City Hall in Chicago. May 6 was the last meeting for the current class of aldermen, ahead of the May 18th inauguration where the new group of aldermen will be sworn in. WBEZ&rsquo;s City Politics reporter Lauren Chooljian was there all day and updates us on the happenings in the council chambers.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-87864bdb-2b49-57d2-bfbd-319f0201128f">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/laurenchooljian">Lauren Chooljian</a> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204251054&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Chicago passes reparations ordinance for torture victims</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The Chicago City Council made history on May 6 passing the $5.5 million dollar reparations ordinance for victims of police torture by disgraced Chicago police commander Jon Burge and his officers. Joey Mogul is a partner at the People&rsquo;s Law Office and a co-founder of the Chicago Torture Justice Memorials. Joey was at the City Council chambers for the vote and joins us with her perspective.</p><p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-87864bdb-2b4a-7864-1f34-89181780e520">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/JoeyMogul">Joey Mogul</a> is a partner at the People&rsquo;s Law Office and a co-founder of Chicago Torture Justice Memorials.</em></p></p> Wed, 06 May 2015 16:31:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-06/afternoon-shift-myth-risks-and-some-medical-tips-allergy-season Closing a 'dark chapter' http://www.wbez.org/news/closing-dark-chapter-111989 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/jon burge ap file_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><em>Updated: May 6, 2015</em></p><p>For Chicagoans, it&rsquo;s now a familiar story.</p><p>More than 100 African American men were tortured between 1972 and 1991 by former Chicago Police Commander Jon Burge and officers under his command. Last month, for the first time, survivors had the opportunity to share their experiences with some members of Chicago&rsquo;s City Council.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;Up until November 2, 1983, I had a partial idea of how black people felt in the South when they were terrorized by the Ku Klux Klan,&rdquo; Darrell Cannon, a Burge victim, testified.</p><p>&ldquo;In my case, I was tortured by the new wave klan. The new wave klan wore badges instead of sheets,&rdquo; Cannon explained.&nbsp;</p><p>According to his testimony, three detectives drove Cannon out to an empty lot on the city&rsquo;s far South Side. There, they held a shotgun to his head and played Russian roulette. They told Cannon the game would go on until he told them what they wanted to hear.</p><p>Cannon spent two dozen years in prison for murder he says he didn&rsquo;t commit. In 1988, the city offered Cannon, and he accepted, $3,000 to settle his torture complaint. Only a handful of Burge&rsquo;s survivors have received compensation from the city.</p><p>That&rsquo;s because the city doesn&rsquo;t have to pay the victims--the statute of limitations has expired in most cases. But there have been strong arguments that for these men and the whole city to heal and move forward, Chicago must confront what Mayor Rahm Emanuel has called a &ldquo;dark chapter&rdquo; in the city&rsquo;s history.</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">More than money</span></p><p>The reparations package, passed by the outgoing City Council Wednesday morning, calls for $5.5 million to be shared by living survivors with credible claims. The People&rsquo;s Law Office, which has been working with victims for more than 20 years, estimates some 120 men would be eligible for reparations; each individual award would be capped at $100,000. The package also calls for a public apology, a permanent public memorial and a counseling center for victims and families on the city&rsquo;s South Side. The ordinance does not specify how it will pay for the counseling center or where, specifically, it will be located.</p><p>And the &ldquo;dark chapter&rdquo; is to be taught in Chicago public schools. According to the city&rsquo;s corporation counsel, Steve Patton, students in 8th and 10th grades would learn about the Burge torture cases in history class, beginning in the 2015-2016 school year. They&rsquo;ll analyze primary source documents, review current cases of police brutality, and they&rsquo;ll discuss ways to improve accountability and protections of civil rights.</p><p>Such public acknowledgment could help repair the public&rsquo;s perception of police, according to former Chicago police officer and current 20th ward Ald. Willie Cochran.</p><p>&ldquo;Just like all of the shootings and killings we see going across the country now, it makes it much more difficult for officers to get the respect from the communities that we deserve,&rdquo; Cochran told a packed gallery at last month&rsquo;s hearing.</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Unanimous support</span></p><p>Before the City Council vote Wednesday, the names of more than a dozen torture victims and survivors were read and they stood while the council gave them a standing ovation.</p><p>&quot;This stain cannot be removed from our city&#39;s history, but it can be used as a lesson of what not to do,&quot; Mayor Emanuel said.</p><p>The council voted 42-0 in favor of the reparations package, making Chicago the first city in the nation to do so.</p><p>Martha Biondi is a scholar of reparations and chair of the department of African American studies at Northwestern University. She said that by passing the reparations ordinance, Chicago could shift the national narrative around the relationship between people and the police.</p><p>&ldquo;This reparations ordinance models a new paradigm, it models a new pathway to justice,&rdquo; Biondi said.</p><p>Biondi believes America is at a crossroads.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re in this crisis...it&rsquo;s really becoming a crisis of governance, of democracy and of public safety,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>But, she added, it&rsquo;s up to the public to rethink and help change the rules around policing.</p><p>&ldquo;Why have we accepted this kind of policing, in city after city after city, in the United States? In which there will be large financial settlements paid out to survivors or family members of police brutality but nothing happens to those officers,&rdquo; Biondi said.</p><p>For his part, Darrell Cannon told the finance committee last month that no amount of money will make up for what he went through, or bring back the family that he lost while he was in prison. But still, he said, to make it this far was a victory in itself.</p><p>But, he added, if he gets some money from the city--he&rsquo;s going to buy a motorcycle.</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m going to ride around City Hall--I&rsquo;m gonna do a lap, to say, &lsquo;Hey, thank you, for finally stepping up and doing the right thing,&rsquo;&rdquo; Cannon said with a smile. He even got a chuckle out of Finance Committee Chair Ald. Ed Burke.</p><p>He told the aldermen he was thankful that he was alive to witness the historic action--and asked them never to allow injustice of this nature to go this long unchecked.</p><p>&ldquo;We are making history...we&rsquo;re doing something that has not been did in any other state in the union. That&rsquo;s saying something about Chicago, that&rsquo;s saying something about Chicago politics,&rdquo; Cannon concluded.</p></p> Tue, 05 May 2015 17:07:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/closing-dark-chapter-111989 Staple Singers' anthem a call for civil rights and reparations http://www.wbez.org/blogs/alison-cuddy/2013-08/staple-singers-anthem-call-civil-rights-and-reparations-108515 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Screen Shot 2013-08-24 at 9.30.53 AM.png" alt="" /><p><p>One of the more stirring and heartfelt songs from the civil rights era is <em>When Will We Be Paid</em>, by the Chicago soul and gospel group The Staple Singers.</p><p>In plainspoken but soulful terms Mavis Staples unpacks the backbone of American prosperity: black slave labor.</p><p><em>We worked this country<br />From shore to shore<br />Our women cooked all your food<br />And washed all your clothes<br />We picked cotton and laid the railroad steel<br />Worked our hands down to the bone at your lumber mill</em></p><p>The Staples released the song in 1970 on <em>We&rsquo;ll Get Over</em>, their second album on the Stax label. The great performance of the song above comes from the film <a href="http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0244807/">Soul to Soul</a>, which documents a 1971 concert in Ghana, featuring mostly American R&amp;B, soul and jazz performers.</p><p>The song itself <a href="http://blog.kexp.org/2010/02/17/kexp-documentaries-civil-rights-songs-%E2%80%93-when-will-we-be-paid-for-the-work-weve-done/">was inspired by a passage</a> in Dr. Martin Luther King Jr&rsquo;s <em>I Have a Dream Speech</em>, given at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom which took place 50 years ago this month.</p><blockquote><p>&ldquo;When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence they were signing a promissory note &hellip; a promise that all men, yes black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked insufficient funds.&rdquo;</p></blockquote><p>Despite those credentials, and the Staples&rsquo; role in the civil rights movement, <em>When Will We Be Paid</em> is not recalled alongside some of the other great anthems of the era, like <em>We Shall Overcome</em>, <em>Go Tell it on the Mountain</em>, and <em>People Get Ready</em>. And neither the song nor the album were a hit for the Staples.</p><p>I wonder if that&rsquo;s in part because the song can be read as an argument for what&rsquo;s proven a controversial topic: reparations. That idea has been around <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reparations_for_slavery_debate_in_the_United_States">since the end of the Civil War</a>, that direct descendants of slaves, either individually or as a group, deserve some kind of monetary compensation for the wrongs suffered by their ancestors.</p><p>Of course the meaning of <em>When Will We Be Paid</em> is also much broader. Following Dr. King&rsquo;s logic, the &ldquo;bad check&rdquo; is a metaphor for the failure to achieve full equality for blacks in America. And the Staples double down on notion by invoking &ldquo;women&rsquo;s work,&rdquo; arguing that equality will only be paid in full if it also extends to black women.</p><p>But the litany of abuses in <a href="http://contreinfo.info/article.php3?id_article=480">the lyrics</a>, the claim that &ldquo;Anytime we ask for pay or a loan/That&rsquo;s when everything seems to turn out wrong,&rdquo; the repeated refrain of &ldquo;When will we get paid/For the work we&rsquo;ve done&rdquo; suggests the song speaks not just of the political but the economic forms of redress required to make the check good.</p><p>If the Staples did have reparations in mind, they&rsquo;d be in good company, at least when it comes to Chicago and Illinois. Many of the more recent arguments for reparations have come from here, made by activists like <a href="http://www.ncobra.org/">N&rsquo;COBRA</a> and the Reverend Jesse Jackson, and by <a href="http://www.finalcall.com/national/reparations5-30-2000.htm">politicians like Dorothy Tillman</a>, Jan Schakowsky, Bobby Rush and Danny Davis. Reparations even came up as a <a href="http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2011/02/10/mayoral-candidates-spar-over-reparations/">topic for debate</a> in Chicago&rsquo;s last Mayoral election.</p><p>Davis was part of a <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_National_Coalition_of_Blacks_for_Reparations_in_America">Congressional group</a> charged with studying the idea of reparations in 2001. He thinks there is something unique about Chicago&rsquo;s position on reparations.</p><p>&ldquo;Chicago sent the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oscar_De_Priest">very first African American</a> to become a member of Congress after the period of Reconstruction,&rdquo; said Davis. &ldquo;Illinois has been the state that has elected two [African American] United State Senators. So Chicago has had a level of progression related to issue raising that many other places in the country have not experienced.&rdquo;</p><p>Though his own group came to naught in terms of serious discussion or recommendations, and never gained broader support from Congress, Davis doesn&rsquo;t think the issue has gone away.</p><p>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t think anyone can deny that slavery has had an adverse effect on many of its descendants,&rdquo; Davis said. &ldquo;People whose relatives or foreparents were enslaved are still feeling the impact and are still being disadvantaged as a result.&rdquo;</p><p>But that is exactly what&rsquo;s proven so controversial about reparations: is payment required to repair that damage? And if so, how much, to whom, and why African Americans, and not other disadvantaged groups?</p><p>Davis thinks reparations don&rsquo;t have to mean paying people outright. He has in mind special incentives like education and training to lift people out of poverty, all of which he thinks can &ldquo;in a sense be called reparations.&rdquo; But reaching consensus on what those would look like has proven no less complex.</p><p>As for The Staple Singers, Davis say&rsquo;s he is a great fan of the group and has been since seeing them as a child in Crossett, Arkansas. To him, the song evokes a key claim for blacks, one that has yet to be fully answered.</p><p>&ldquo;The notion of when will we be paid, or when will we really reach the point when there is full citizenship, with no barriers, no prohibitions, with nothing that holds us back and reminds us of this previous condition of servitude, when will that happen -- if it will?&rdquo;</p><p><em>Alison Cuddy is WBEZ&rsquo;s Arts and Culture reporter and co-host of <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/wbezs-changing-channels/id669715774?mt=2">Changing Channels</a>, a podcast about the future of television. Follow her on <a href="https://twitter.com/wbezacuddy">Twitter</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/cuddyalison?ref=tn_tnmn">Facebook</a> and <a href="http://instagram.com/cuddyreport#">Instagram</a></em></p></p> Sat, 24 Aug 2013 09:25:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/alison-cuddy/2013-08/staple-singers-anthem-call-civil-rights-and-reparations-108515 Northwestern to investigate founder’s connection to historic massacre http://www.wbez.org/news/northwestern-investigate-founder%E2%80%99s-connection-historic-massacre-105689 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F80401078" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/evans%20letter.gif" style="float: left; height: 380px; width: 280px;" title="A letter from Washington in 1865 asked John Evans to resign as governor of Colorado over his role in Sandy Creek. (Colorado State Archives)" />When Gary Alan Fine was named the John Evans Professor of Sociology at Northwestern, he wanted to know more about his title.</p><p>&ldquo;I got on the internet and googled, and within 30 seconds I was shocked,&rdquo; Fine said. He found out Evans was governor of Colorado in 1864, the year of the Sand Creek Massacre.</p><p>Colorado cavalrymen murdered more than 150 civilian Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians in one of the most notorious mass killings in U.S. history.</p><p>&ldquo;Children killed in front of their mothers, women who had their breasts cut off, I mean just a horrific story,&rdquo; Fine said, calling it one of most significant events of genocide in U.S. history.</p><p>Colorado&rsquo;s frontier government was effectively at war with the Cheyenne&rsquo;s and the Arapahoes, but the government had offered up the Sand Creek camp as a refuge for tribal members who were willing not to fight white settlers and railroad men. In other words, the massacre amounted to a bloody attack on a peaceful refugee camp.</p><p>Evans was not present at Sand Creek &ndash; he was out of the state on business &ndash; but as the territorial governor he somehow approved the action. He was removed from his post as governor after <a href="http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/resources/archives/four/sandcrk.htm#smith" target="_blank">Congress caught wind of the events</a>, but he remained president of Northwestern&rsquo;s Board of Trustees for thirty years after the fact.</p><p>The City of Evanston is Evans&rsquo; best-known namesake, and his fortune as a railroad mogul played a major role in Northwestern&rsquo;s early development. Multiple emeritus positions and the school&rsquo;s alumni house all carry Evans&rsquo; name.</p><p>That&rsquo;s why Northwestern Senior Adam Mendel took note when he saw Evans&rsquo; name connected to Sand Creek in readings for a class. After further researching Evans and finding out that he was considered culpable for the massacre, Mendel got together with members of the Native American and Indigenous Student Alliance to demand an explanation from the university as to why this part of Evans past was not in the biography of Evans on the university website.</p><p>Mendel said the students wanted &ldquo;recognition of John Evans&rsquo; role in Sand Creek and the way in which his profits from clearing the land of the Native population led to the development of the school.&rdquo;</p><p>They put together a petition that asks for the establishment of a Native American studies program and a scholarship fund for Cheyenne and Arapaho students. The group also wants a permanent memorial built on campus with input from the tribes.</p><p>The university responded in mid-February by announcing a committee of seven scholars to research Evans. The committee plans to release a report in 2014 on Evans&rsquo; connection to the massacre and on links between Evans&rsquo; financial contributions his policies towards Native tribes as governor of Colorado.</p><p>&ldquo;The year 2014 will mark the 150th anniversary of Sand Creek, so it is appropriate to assess how and what we report about John Evans as part of our institutional history, and if and in what way we should continue to recognize his contributions to the University,&rdquo; Provost Daniel Linzer said in a statement. &ldquo;Although Sand Creek occurred 13 years after the establishment of Northwestern, we would like to know in detail the nature of John Evans&rsquo; relationship with the University when he was territorial governor and afterwards.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m ecstatic that the committee is going to be formed,&rdquo; Mendel said.</p><p>He&rsquo;s disappointed that the committee does not include students or any members of the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, but said it&rsquo;s a great start.</p><p>Fine has high hopes for where the research could take the university.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;What do we owe the Cheyenne and Arapaho, what do we owe native students, what do we owe the students today in terms of remembering our own traumatic history. How do you memorialize trauma?&rdquo; Fine asked.</p><p>He cites the work of Brown University, which formed a committee in 2003 to <a href="http://brown.edu/Research/Slavery_Justice/about/letter.html" target="_blank">address historic links to slavery</a> at the university. In 2007, Brown announced it would give $10 million in an endowment to local public schools as a form of reparations.</p><p>Fine hopes Northwestern will eventually do something similar by helping Native American students get access to higher education. Recent numbers show just seven percent of Native American kindergarteners end up graduating from college.</p><p>Follow <a href="https://twitter.com/LewisPants" target="_blank">Lewis Wallace on Twitter</a>.</p></p> Fri, 22 Feb 2013 14:15:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/northwestern-investigate-founder%E2%80%99s-connection-historic-massacre-105689