WBEZ | avian influenza http://www.wbez.org/tags/avian-influenza Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en China's poultry passion persists despite bird flu blues http://www.wbez.org/blogs/louisa-chu/2013-04/chinas-poultry-passion-persists-despite-bird-flu-blues-106432 <p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://instagram.com/p/XnJqX7xRpQ/"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/shanghaichickensilkie.JPG" style="height: 620px; width: 620px;" title="Silkie chicken at Lotus supermarket in Shanghai, China (WBEZ/Louisa Chu)" /></a></p><p>Greetings from Shanghai, where <u><a href="http://www.scmp.com/news/china/article/1205499/new-case-bird-flu-infection-reported-nanjing">a new strain of bird flu</a></u>&nbsp;has killed two men and caused four more people to become critically ill. A patient diagnosis leaked to the Chinese social media site Weibo offered details of the most recent patient: a woman who worked as a poultry butcher in a Nanjing market. On March 30, doctors confirmed she was infected with H7N9 avian influenza. There is no vaccine for this version of the flu.</p><p>In the meantime, despite <u><a href="http://www.theatlanticwire.com/global/2013/04/bird-flu-deaths-has-china-edge/63729/">reports to the contrary</a>,</u>&nbsp;and the lack of any visible signs of an emergency plan in action, I can tell you that from here, the taste for poultry lives on in Shanghai.&nbsp;</p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/louisachu/8613383581/"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/shanghaismokedduck.jpg" style="width: 620px;" title="Jasmine Tea Smoked Duck at Jardin de Jade in Shanghai, China (WBEZ/Louisa Chu)" /></a></div><div class="image-insert-image ">In the few days I&#39;ve been here, I&#39;ve eaten tea-smoked duck, tea-smoked goose, and even chicken feet for breakfast.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">At the Lotus supermarket, located at the foot of Shanghai&#39;s most famous landmark, the&nbsp;<u><a href="http://www.orientalpearltower.com/en/">Oriental Pearl Tower</a></u>, I found blue-black-skinned Silkie chickens, as prized as ever. In Chicago you can find them at the live markets, too.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/shanghaismokedgoose.jpg" style="width: 620px;" title="Tea smoked goose at Xin Wang Tea Restaurant in Shanghai, China (WBEZ/Louisa Chu)" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">Lean and gamy, Silkies are used most often as a traditional Chinese tonic soup, <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/louisa-chu/2013-03/wisconsin-ginseng-sex-drugs-and-root-robbers-106315"><u>fragrant with ginseng</u></a> and other medicinal herbs &mdash;&nbsp;a rather ironic cure-all given the present state of things.</div></div><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://instagram.com/p/XnJE5vRRom/"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/shanghaichickenfeet.JPG" style="height: 620px; width: 620px;" title="Chicken feet on breakfast buffet at Kerry Hotel in Shanghai, China (WBEZ/Louisa Chu)" /></a></div><p><a href="https://twitter.com/louisachu"><u><em>Follow Louisa Chu on Twitter.</em></u></a></p></p> Tue, 02 Apr 2013 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/louisa-chu/2013-04/chinas-poultry-passion-persists-despite-bird-flu-blues-106432