WBEZ | millennials http://www.wbez.org/tags/millennials Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Whole Foods Might Include Tattoo Parlors in its New Stores http://www.wbez.org/programs/marketplace/2016-02-12/whole-foods-might-include-tattoo-parlors-its-new-stores-114824 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/GettyImages-488633881_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Whole Foods just became more Whole Food-ish.</p><p>The company&#39;s in the middle of rolling out a new store brand. It&#39;s called Friends of 365. Smaller, just as natural organic healthy, you know the drill.</p><p>Here&#39;s the twist, though: Bloomberg reported today, and the company confirms, that the new stores will also host smaller pop-up shops.</p><p>Record stores, perhaps. Vinyl, of course. Or, tattoo parlors.</p><p>Not making this up.</p><p><em>Follow Kai Ryssdal at @kairyssdal</em></p></p> Fri, 12 Feb 2016 10:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/marketplace/2016-02-12/whole-foods-might-include-tattoo-parlors-its-new-stores-114824 Like Millennials, More Older Americans Steering Away From Driving http://www.wbez.org/news/millennials-more-older-americans-steering-away-driving-114809 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/594830977-47edb03ad5a30e956497a3e9db74c33e0d704fe2.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A growing number of Americans are driving less and getting rid of their cars.</p><p>The trend is gaining traction in middle-aged adults, to the point where fewer of them are even bothering to get or renew their driver&#39;s licenses, but it&#39;s been prominent among younger adults &mdash; millennials &mdash; for years now.</p><p>&quot;Honestly, at this point, it just doesn&#39;t really seem worth it,&quot; says 25-year-old Peter Rebecca, who doesn&#39;t own a car or have a driver&#39;s license. &quot;I mean, I live in Chicago, there&#39;s really good access to, you know, public transits for pretty cheap.&quot;</p><p>The student at Harold Washington College downtown lives just a couple of blocks from a rail stop on the Northwest side. In the warmer months, Rebecca says, he uses a bike.</p><p>&quot;I&#39;ve got a bunch of grocery stores in walking distance, and even then I can use the bus if I have to get further,&quot; he says.</p><p>Rebecca is hardly alone, especially among young adults in urban areas.</p><p>&quot;Over the past several decades, particularly for the youngest age groups, there&#39;s been a pretty large decrease in the number of people who have been getting driver&#39;s licenses,&quot; says Brandon Schoettle, a researcher at the University of Michigan.</p><p>He led&nbsp;<a href="http://www.umich.edu/~umtriswt/PDF/UMTRI-2016-4_Abstract_English.pdf">a new study published&nbsp;</a>by University of Michigan&#39;s Transportation Research Institute that studied the proportion of people with driver&#39;s licenses over the years.</p><p>According to the study, only 69 percent of 19-year-olds have a driver&#39;s license in 2014, compared with almost 90 percent in 1983. The percentage of 20-somethings with driver&#39;s licenses has also fallen by 13 percent over the past three decades, and fewer Americans in their 30s and 40s now have driver&#39;s licenses.</p><div id="res466332451"><div id="responsive-embed-drivers-licenses-20160210"><iframe frameborder="0" height="829px" marginheight="0" scrolling="no" src="http://apps.npr.org/dailygraphics/graphics/drivers-licenses-20160210/child.html?initialWidth=774&amp;childId=responsive-embed-drivers-licenses-20160210&amp;parentUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.npr.org%2F2016%2F02%2F11%2F466178523%2Flike-millennials-more-older-americans-steering-away-from-driving%3Fft%3Dnprml%26f%3D466178523" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; border-style: initial; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;" width="620px"></iframe></div></div><p>Susan Schell might soon be one of them. The manager of a Starbucks on Chicago&#39;s northwest side says her driver&#39;s license is up for renewal this month, yet she doesn&#39;t own a car.</p><p>&quot;I used to. I got rid of it just because it&#39;s too much of a pain in the butt to have in Chicago, and we kept getting tickets and I just didn&#39;t want to deal with it,&quot; Schell says.</p><p>In addition to living in a city that is relentless in doling out parking tickets, Schell says, there&#39;s the cost of insurance, gas and maintenance on top of the cost of the car itself. Her husband recently let his driver&#39;s license expire because they take public transit to work, and they have other options for shopping.</p><p>&quot;We use services like Instacart a lot,&quot; she says. &quot;... If we&#39;ve done, like, a big trip at Target or something, we just call an Uber. There&#39;s so many options when you live in a city.&quot;</p><p>&quot;For some of the oldest age groups, which had seen relatively large increases in licensing over the past few decades, finally seemed to have peaked and have started to show some small decreases in licensing,&quot; he says. &quot;And so, for the first time in the series of reports that we&#39;ve done, we&#39;ve kind of seen a decrease in the percentage of people with a license across all age groups.&quot;Schoettle says now this trend is not just limited to teenagers and those in their 20s.</p><p>Forty-eight-year-old Raul Chavez hasn&#39;t renewed his driver&#39;s license since it expired more than a year ago &mdash; and he keeps his car parked.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s quite a bit expensive, because you have to have insurance,&quot; he says. &quot;The latest two years, I use public transportation and I really enjoy it because it&#39;s cheap and it&#39;s reliable everywhere you&#39;re gonna go.&quot;</p><p>Schoettle says that&#39;s one of the main reasons more Americans of all ages are going without driver&#39;s licenses.</p><p>&quot;There&#39;s been a shift publicly for people to move to things like public transportation that just wasn&#39;t there back in the &#39;80s and &#39;90s, partly because there&#39;s sometimes better public transportation in certain areas than there was a few decades ago, and a little more concern about the environment,&quot; he says.</p><p>Schoettle says he&#39;ll be watching to see if cheaper gas might now reverse the trend.</p><p><a href="http://www.npr.org/2016/02/11/466178523/like-millennials-more-older-americans-steering-away-from-driving?ft=nprml&amp;f=466178523"><em>&mdash; via NPR</em></a></p></p> Thu, 11 Feb 2016 15:06:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/millennials-more-older-americans-steering-away-driving-114809 Millennials Lagging Behind Boomers in Entrepreneurhsip http://www.wbez.org/programs/marketplace/2016-02-09/millennials-lagging-behind-boomers-entrepreneurhsip-114774 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/mmillennials.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Millennials may be&nbsp;<a href="http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/05/11/millennials-surpass-gen-xers-as-the-largest-generation-in-u-s-labor-force/" target="_blank">surpassing Gen X</a>&nbsp;in the workforce, but a new government&nbsp;<a href="https://www.sba.gov/sites/default/files/advocacy/Millenial_IB.pdf" target="_blank">report&nbsp;</a>says they&#39;re not opening their own businesses quite yet.</p><p>The Small Business Administration&#39;s advocacy office found less than 2 percent of people born between 1982 and 2000 said they were self-employed, compared to 7.6 percent of Gen X-ers and 8.3 percent of baby boomers, according to 2014 census data. As the portion of employed millennials expanded steadily over the past 15 years, the portion of self-employed millennials only saw modest gains.</p><figure><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Chart via Small Business Administration" sizes="(max-width: 543px) 90vw, (max-width: 879px) 60vw, 900px" src="http://cms.marketplace.org/sites/default/files/selfemployedmils.jpg" srcset="http://cms.marketplace.org/sites/default/files/selfemployedmils.jpg 646w" style="height: 378px; width: 540px;" title="(Chart via Small Business Administration)" /></p><p>But how many entrepreneurs under 30 do you know? The Administration report notes there are many baby-faced business owners in Silicon Valley, but entrepreneurship generally doesn&#39;t peak until a generation reaches its 40s, and workers have had time to build a career. The report also compares past reports to look at how self-employment changed by age for each generation.</p><p>Though there&#39;s only data for millennials aged 32 or under, they seem to be starting their own businesses less often than previous generations did at their age. At 30 years old, less than four percent of millennials said they were self-employed, compared to 5.4 percent of Generation X and 6.7 percent of boomers.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Chart via Small Business Administration" sizes="(max-width: 543px) 90vw, (max-width: 879px) 60vw, 900px" src="http://cms.marketplace.org/sites/default/files/selfemployed30.jpg" srcset="http://cms.marketplace.org/sites/default/files/selfemployed30.jpg 646w" style="height: 378px; width: 540px;" title="(Chart via Small Business Administration)" /></p><p>So it appears that fewer millennials are becoming entrepreneurs, but does that mean snake people are less entrepreneurial? That&#39;s less clear. The report notes it&#39;s possible millennials could eventually match or surpass prior generations over the next few decades.</p><p>There&#39;s also a big caveat around methodology here: the study looks a surveys in which people said their primary source of income over the past year came from self-employment, which could leave out new opportunities for entrepreneurship. The<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/08/style/this-is-her-face-this-is-her-face-in-bread-any-questions.html" target="_blank">&nbsp;copywriter with a successful Instagram account&nbsp;</a>might make some money on the side, but she&nbsp;doesn&#39;t qualify unless she quits her day job. And what about the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.newyorkfed.org/medialibrary/media/research/current_issues/ci20-1.pdf" target="_blank">distressingly high number</a>&nbsp;of underemployed millennials who turn to the sharing economy for money? Ride-share services insist drivers are self-employed contractors, but a recent college graduate who drives Uber to make ends meet might not see himself that way.</p><p><em>Follow&nbsp;Tony Wagner&nbsp;at&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/tonydwagner">@tonydwagner</a>.&nbsp;</em></p></figure></p> Tue, 09 Feb 2016 12:25:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/marketplace/2016-02-09/millennials-lagging-behind-boomers-entrepreneurhsip-114774 The Black Millennial Vote http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2016-01-25/black-millennial-vote-114609 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Millennial Voters-Jon Dickson.png" alt="" /><p><div>With the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement and the upcoming 2016 election, <a href="http://www.wbez.org/half-black-millennials-know-victim-police-violence-113628">black millennials</a> are a key demographic for Democrats.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>But some young black men and women say they don&rsquo;t want to be seen as an automatic vote for whichever Democrat happens to be on the ballot.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;<a href="http://www.theroot.com/articles/politics/2016/01/will_black_millennials_dance_with_the_party_of_our_parents.html">Will Black Millennials Dance with the Party of Our Parents</a>?&rdquo; That&rsquo;s the question <a href="https://twitter.com/NyleFort?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor">Nyle Fort</a> poses in his recent article for TheRoot.com. Fort, a minister, organizer and scholar at Princeton University, joins us for a discussion.</div></p> Mon, 25 Jan 2016 15:30:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2016-01-25/black-millennial-vote-114609 Millennials Want To Send Troops To Fight ISIS, But Don't Want To Serve http://www.wbez.org/news/millennials-want-send-troops-fight-isis-dont-want-serve-114126 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/gettyimages-469482108_wide-4d978f8362eb141fbfffbd5b18a33ede6af639d1-s800-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res459203008" previewtitle="In a new survey, 60 percent of 18- to 29-year-olds say they support U.S. combat troops to fight ISIS. But 62 percent of those polled say they would definitely not join the fight."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="In a new survey, 60 percent of 18- to 29-year-olds say they support U.S. combat troops to fight ISIS. But 62 percent of those polled say they would definitely not join the fight." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/12/10/gettyimages-469482108_wide-4d978f8362eb141fbfffbd5b18a33ede6af639d1-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 348px; width: 620px;" title="In a new survey, 60 percent of 18- to 29-year-olds say they support U.S. combat troops to fight ISIS. But 62 percent of those polled say they would definitely not join the fight. (John Moore/Getty Images)" /></div><div><div><p>In the wake of the Paris attacks, a majority of young Americans support sending U.S. ground troops to fight ISIS, according to a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.iop.harvard.edu/harvard-iop-fall-2015-poll" target="_blank">wide-ranging new poll</a>&nbsp;from the Harvard Institute of Politics.</p></div></div></div><p>The institute has asked millennials about the idea of American boots on the ground at three different times this year, and the survey results have fluctuated somewhat, but there seems to be a &quot;hardening of support.&quot;</p><p>In this most recent survey, 60 percent of the 18- to 29-year-olds polled say they support committing U.S. combat troops to fight ISIS. But an almost equal number (62 percent) say they wouldn&#39;t want to personally join the fight, even if the U.S. needed additional troops.</p><p>The disconnect in joining the fight comes down to how millennials feel about the government writ large, according to Harvard IOP Polling Director John Della Volpe.</p><p>&quot;I&#39;m reminded of the significant degree of distrust that this generation has about all things related to government,&quot; said Della Volpe. &quot;And I believe if young people had a better relationship with government ... they&#39;d be more open to serving.&quot;</p><p>Della Volpe does caution, though, that this poll doesn&#39;t dig into the size or the scope of the military campaign that young folks would be willing to theoretically support.</p><p>&quot;I can&#39;t tell you that young people support 5,000 troops or 50,000 troops,&quot; he said.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><div id="res459125538"><div id="responsive-embed-millennials-troops-20151209"><p data-pym-src="http://apps.npr.org/dailygraphics/graphics/millennials-troops-20151209/child.html">&nbsp;</p></div></div><p>Here are four other takeaways from the poll that help us explain the political attitudes of young people this election cycle.</p><p><strong>1. Building a wall at the border</strong></p><p>Forty-three percent of the young Americans polled welcome the idea of building a wall along the U.S. Southern border with Mexico. But support differs sharply along partisan lines. Seventy percent of Republicans surveyed supported the wall, compared with 31 percent of Democrats.</p><p>&quot;This is a very divisive issue,&quot; said Della Volpe. &quot;And you can really kind of predict who&#39;s gonna support it based on what their race is and also what their political party is.&quot;</p><p>A majority of white 18- to 29-year-olds polled support the wall, but only about a quarter of young Hispanics do.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s clearly kind of a wedge issue &mdash; something that illustrates significant differences in the way that young Republicans and young Democrats view America,&quot; said Della Volpe.</p><div id="con459125656" previewtitle="graphic"><div id="res459125612">&nbsp;</div></div><div id="responsive-embed-millennials-democrat-20151209"><iframe align="right" frameborder="0" height="729px" marginheight="0" scrolling="no" src="http://apps.npr.org/dailygraphics/graphics/millennials-democrat-20151209/child.html?initialWidth=304&amp;childId=responsive-embed-millennials-democrat-20151209&amp;parentUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.npr.org%2F2015%2F12%2F10%2F459111960%2Fmillennials-want-to-send-troops-to-fight-isis-but-not-serve%3Fft%3Dnprml%26f%3D459111960" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; border-style: initial; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;" width="310"></iframe></div><p><strong>2. Skyrocketing support for Bernie Sanders</strong></p><p>The Harvard IOP poll is conducted twice a year &mdash; in the fall and in the spring.</p><p>In the spring, Bernie Sanders seemed like a blip on the radar &mdash; just 1 percent of young Democratic primary voters supported him. Now, he&#39;s edging out Hillary Clinton (41 percent to 35 percent).</p><p>&quot;The idea of any candidate moving 40 points or so over the course of six months, frankly, is extraordinary,&quot; said Della Volpe.</p><p>But, he says, it&#39;s not surprising to see huge support for Sanders when you line up his campaign with some of the attributes that young people want to see in a candidate.</p><p>&quot;For example, young people telling us they&#39;re interested in somebody who is authentic, who has integrity &mdash; these are some of the hallmarks, I think, of the ways in which young people would describe Bernie Sanders&#39; campaign,&quot; said Della Volpe.</p><p>Among young Republicans, Donald Trump has a slim lead (22 percent) over Ben Carson (20 percent).</p><p><strong>3. No labels</strong></p><p>Sanders is a self-described &quot;democratic socialist,&quot; a label that commentators and some of Sanders&#39; opponents have suggested could be a problem. They question Sanders&#39; ability to govern a capitalist economy. Sanders even delivered a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/11/19/456683688/bernie-sanders-delivers-anticipated-speech-on-democratic-socialism">speech about his vision of democratic socialism</a>, but, as NPR&#39;s Sam Sanders has&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/11/21/456676215/why-do-young-people-like-socialism-more-than-older-people">reported,</a>&nbsp;many young people don&#39;t mind the label.</p><p>The Harvard IOP poll finds the term makes &quot;no difference&quot; to 66 percent of likely Democratic voters.</p><p>&quot;Young people are fiercely independent,&quot; said Della Volpe. &quot;They&#39;re not looking at a label, they&#39;re looking at a person and his platform.&quot;</p><p>What&#39;s perhaps more interesting is that for some millennials, the label does carry a connotation &mdash; and not the one pundits may have thought. For some young folks, democratic socialism is a plus &mdash; 24 percent say the &quot;democratic socialist&quot; ID makes them &quot;more likely&quot; to vote for Sanders.</p><p><strong>4. Disinterested Democrats?</strong></p><p>Young voters lean left, so it&#39;s no surprise that a majority (56 percent) in this poll want a Democrat to maintain control of the White House. Only 36 percent say they prefer a Republican candidate.</p><p>The Democrats have widened the gap over the past six months, when Harvard IOP last polled.</p><p>&quot;Republicans had been making progress, but it looks like they might have taken a step back in terms of connecting their views with America&#39;s millennial generation, &quot; said Della Volpe.</p><p>In particular, Democrats seem to be doing better among younger 18- to 24-year-olds. (As we&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/itsallpolitics/2015/10/06/446006485/meet-the-obama-era-kids-who-are-about-to-be-first-time-voters">previously reported</a>, there had been some indication that these younger millennials might be more conservative than their older siblings.)</p><div id="res459125580">&quot;We see fewer people today interested in supporting the Republican Party than we had six months ago,&quot; said Della Volpe. &quot;And the only thing that has changed between now and six months ago is that we&#39;ve had ... several Republican debates, and a lot of opportunities for Republicans &mdash; Donald Trump, Ben Carson and others &mdash; to share their views.&quot;</div><p>But regardless of political affiliation, most millennials still say they don&#39;t follow politics. And a majority say they&#39;re not following the presidential race. More than three-quarters of those polled say they&#39;re not politically engaged.</p><p>Harvard Institute of Politics GFK-Knowledge Panel was a survey of 2,011 18- to 29- year-old U.S. citizens interviewed from Oct. 30 to Nov. 9, 2015. An exception was the section on sending ground troops and serving in the military, which had a sample size of 435, and was re-asked following the November attacks in Paris. The margin of error for questions asked of the entire panel is +/- 2.8 percentage points.</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/12/10/459111960/millennials-want-to-send-troops-to-fight-isis-but-not-serve?ft=nprml&amp;f=459111960" target="_blank"><em>via NPR</em></a></p></p> Thu, 10 Dec 2015 09:28:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/millennials-want-send-troops-fight-isis-dont-want-serve-114126 Dating app helps Muslim millennials find love, parents not included http://www.wbez.org/news/dating-app-helps-muslim-millennials-find-love-parents-not-included-113781 <p><div id="res454005967" previewtitle="Tariq and Ummehaany Azam dance to &quot;Fly Me to the Moon&quot; at their wedding reception."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Tariq and Ummehaany Azam dance to &quot;Fly Me to the Moon&quot; at their wedding reception." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/02/beautiful-dancers-15b631dbcb4c1443ff45387a00f62128ecad73d1-s700-c85.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="Tariq and Ummehaany Azam dance to &quot;Fly Me to the Moon&quot; at their wedding reception. (Courtesy of Tariq Azam)" /></div><div><div><p>Finding someone to spend your life with can be hard under any circumstances, but young observant Muslims will tell you that here in the U.S., it&#39;s doubly so. They have to navigate strict Islamic dating rules while interacting with the opposite gender in a Westernized world.</p><p>Now, a handful of young Muslims think that a new app called Ishqr provides a partial solution.</p></div></div></div><p>Humaira Mubeen is one of the many Muslim millennials who self-identifies as a &quot;Mipster,&quot; or Muslim hipster. &quot;I became part of this community called Mipsters. It was a bunch of proud Muslim Americans coming together talking about a lot of issues,&quot; says Mubeen. &quot;One of the topics of discussion was always trying to get married.&quot;</p><p>Apparently, it&#39;s hard to find someone who is not only compatible, but also shares a mix of Muslim and American values. Mubeen says, &quot;A year into being part of [the Mipster] community, I jokingly said, &#39;Why don&#39;t I make a website to connect all of you, because you all seem really cool?&#39; &quot;</p><p>Then the emails started pouring in with people asking where to sign up. Mubeen tried to explain that she had been joking, but eventually she felt compelled to build Ishqr, a website to help Muslims find each other. &quot;If Instagram and dating apps had a baby, it would be Ishqr,&quot; says Mubeen.</p><div id="res454245229"><aside aria-label="pullquote" role="complementary"><div><p>Finding someone to spend your life with can be hard under any circumstances, but young observant Muslims will tell you that here in the U.S., it&#39;s doubly so.</p></div></aside></div><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Capture_5.JPG" style="height: 258px; width: 310px; float: right; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" title="" /><em>Ishq&nbsp;</em>is an Arabic word for love, and the &quot;r&quot; was added at the end, Mubeen says, to make it sound more hip. More than 6,000 people have signed up on the Ishqr website since it went up just over a year ago. The app went live on iTunes in October.</p><p>Mubeen explains that when you sign up, Ishqr asks you for some basic information: a username, your religious preference (Shia, Sunni and &quot;Just Muslim, yo&quot; are all options) and why you&#39;ve decided to join. She says people sign up to make friends, test the waters and sometimes to get married.</p><p>Some users come in with the mentality that, &quot;If you don&#39;t want to get married in the next five months, let&#39;s not talk.&quot; Talking about marriage right up front might sound a little pushy, but it can work.</p><p>Tariq and Ummehaany Azam met on Ishqr. He&#39;s a medical resident, and she&#39;s a test development professional. Ummehaany described what led her to Ishqr: &quot;This is the first website for the Muslim community in which the person looking to meet someone is creating their own profile, and they are more involved in what goes into the profile and in talking about what they are looking for.&quot;</p><p>That&#39;s important, because on many Muslim online matchmaking sites, parents play matchmaker, and young people don&#39;t have much of a say. Tariq was on one of those more traditional sites for a couple of weeks. &quot;I actually received a phone call from some girl&#39;s mother,&quot; he says, &quot;being like, &#39;We saw your profile, we really like you.&#39; And I was completely shocked. ... That was way too much.&quot; He deleted his profile the next day.</p><p>Besides keeping parents out of the picture, Ishqr is different from other dating sites in another way: Photos aren&#39;t posted. As cliche as it sounds, it really is about discovering someone&#39;s personality. When he joined Ishqr, Tariq found Ummehaany&#39;s profile and asked her to read his. Evidently she liked what she saw: The two married this past May.</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2015/11/13/453988763/ishqr-helps-muslim-millenials-find-love-parents-not-included?ft=nprml&amp;f=453988763" target="_blank"><em> via NPR&#39;s Code Switch</em></a></p></p> Fri, 13 Nov 2015 13:03:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/dating-app-helps-muslim-millennials-find-love-parents-not-included-113781 This generation of military families faces the prospect of 20 years of deployments http://www.wbez.org/programs/takeaway/2015-10-20/generation-military-families-faces-prospect-20-years-deployments-113421 <p><p><img alt="" src="http://cdn1.pri.org/sites/default/files/styles/story_main/public/story/images/mil-families.jpg?itok=c0ETzYt7" style="height: 349px; width: 620px;" title="Friends and family watch as paratroopers with the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, return home from Afghanistan at Pope Army Airfield in Fort Bragg, North Carolina November 5, 2014. (Chris Keane/Reuters)" /></p><div><p>Mason&nbsp;Bontrager&nbsp;joined the military right before 9/11. Since then, he has deployed five times &mdash; twice to Iraq and three times to Afghanistan.</p><p dir="ltr">With President Barack Obama recently announcing that he would suspend the drawdown of troops from the US, that means he may deploy once again.</p></div><p dir="ltr">His wife,&nbsp;Amy, says her family is part of a new generation of military families facing unprecedented circumstances. For many young military couples like the Bontragers, their entire marriage has come with the threat of war, and there appears to be no end in sight.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;We&rsquo;re definitely facing this reality of what it looks like to raise children in this lifestyle,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;We could be the first generation that&rsquo;s going to experience 20 years of deployment. What that&rsquo;s like to raise a family &mdash; we have nothing to compare it to. We&rsquo;re learning as we go, but we also rely heavily on the support of our country so that we can continue to serve this mission.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">And that&rsquo;s just a hard reality of America&rsquo;s longest war: After more than a decade, servicemembers are being called to battle &mdash; again and again and again.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Deployments are challenging and it&rsquo;s hard, and each time he goes there are uncertainties,&rdquo; Amy says. &ldquo;We have to accept that mission because that&rsquo;s the mission that&rsquo;s been given to us by our commander-in-chief. This is new to millennials. In 2001, did we think we&rsquo;d still be at war? That probably wasn&rsquo;t even a thought. But this is our reality. We realize that the mission is much greater than us, and we stand ready to serve. That&rsquo;s what it means to be in the military today.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Over the course of nearly 10 years of marriage, the Bontragers have lived in five different locations. Though her husband has completed five tours of duty, he&rsquo;s not ready to quit &mdash; Amy says her husband is part of a group that feels it is their obligation to put in an end to the conflict, because they were the ones fighting in the beginning.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;That&rsquo;s a conversation that happens in a lot of homes, and day-to-day it changes &mdash; do you stay in or do you get out?&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;But it goes back to that commitment, and you realize that, for some of these guys, they feel they&rsquo;re called to do this and this is what they&rsquo;re built for and they&rsquo;re trained for. It&rsquo;s hard &mdash; you look at these children and think this is a very different lifestyle that they are being brought up in when compared to other children in our country. But then you realize that it&rsquo;s something that&rsquo;s much greater than us.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/bluestar.JPG" style="height: 194px; width: 310px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: right;" title="(Via BlueStarFam.org)" />Amy, who has a master&rsquo;s degree in philanthropy, has had to change jobs to meet the needs of her family. Now she&rsquo;s the program manager with<a href="https://www.bluestarfam.org/"> Blue Star Families</a>, an organization formed in April 2009 by a group of military spouses. The group works &ldquo;to create a platform where military family members can join with civilian communities and leaders to address the challenges of military life,&rdquo;&nbsp;<a href="http://bluestarfam.org/about">according to</a>&nbsp;a statement on the Blue Star website.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I&rsquo;m really excited that I&rsquo;ve been able to give back through the organization that I work with,&rdquo; Amy says. &ldquo;There&rsquo;s a lot of work to be done, and we do have support, but we&rsquo;re going to continue to need that support.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">&mdash;<a href="http://www.pri.org/stories/2015-10-20/generation-military-families-faces-prospects-20-years-deployments"><em> via The Takeaway</em></a></p></p> Tue, 20 Oct 2015 10:07:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/takeaway/2015-10-20/generation-military-families-faces-prospect-20-years-deployments-113421 Is the resilience of millennials underrated? http://www.wbez.org/news/resilience-millennials-underrated-113281 <p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Katherine%20Streeter%20for%20NPR.jpeg" style="height: 336px; width: 600px;" title="(Katherine Streeter for NPR)" /></div><div><p>I&#39;m a member of Generation Y, or the millennial generation. People like me were born in the &#39;80s and early &#39;90s. But I don&#39;t like to broadcast that fact. Millennials tend to get a bad rap.</p><p>Journalists and commentators love ragging on us. They say we&#39;re ill-prepared to deal with life&#39;s challenges. And that, as a result, we have higher rates of mental health issues like depression and anxiety.</p><p>These ideas have been coming up over and over again for almost a decade now. There&#39;s psychologist&nbsp;<a href="http://www.jeantwenge.com/">Jean Twenge</a>, for instance, who in 2006 published a book called<em> Generation Me: Why Today&#39;s Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled &mdash; and More Miserable Than Ever Before</em>. &quot;In past generations, suicide and depression were considered afflictions of middle age,&quot; she writes. &quot;But for Generation Me, these problems are a rite of passage through adolescence and young adulthood&quot;</p><p>Then there&#39;s&nbsp;<a href="http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/medical_examiner/2013/12/millennial_narcissism_helicopter_parents_are_college_students_bigger_problem.html">the Slate article</a>&nbsp;from a couple of years ago, titled &quot;Why Millennials Can&#39;t Grow Up.&quot; The explanation, according to psychotherapist Brooke Donatone: &quot;Their biggest challenge is conflict negotiation and they often are unable to think for themselves.&quot; Last year, in&nbsp;<em>Vanity Fair,</em> Bret Easton Ellis&nbsp;<a href="http://www.vanityfair.fr/culture/livre/articles/generation-wuss-by-bret-easton-ellis/15837">called us</a>&nbsp;&quot;Generation Wuss.&quot; Even NPR has asked: Are millennials&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2014/10/14/352979540/getting-some-me-time-why-millennials-are-so-individualistic">too narcissistic</a>? Do they&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2014/04/16/303741790/debate-millennials-dont-stand-a-chance">stand a chance</a>?</p><p>And now we&#39;re starting to turn against ourselves. In a recent&nbsp;Telegraph&nbsp;article reporter Rachael Dove, a self-identifying millennial, wrote&nbsp;<a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-health/11534390/Anxiety-the-epidemic-sweeping-through-Generation-Y.html">a piece</a>&nbsp;titled &quot;Anxiety: the epidemic sweeping through Generation Y.&quot;</p><p>My friend Jay and I recently had a good laugh as we read through these articles together. &quot;Harsh,&quot; he said. &quot;But also kind of ridiculous.&quot;</p><p>Still, I wondered: Could it be true? Could it be that millennials really are more depressed and anxious than young people from generations past?</p><p>&quot;I&#39;ve definitely heard reports regarding increased levels of psychopathology among millennials,&quot; says&nbsp;<a href="http://mitch.web.unc.edu/">Mitch Prinstein</a>, a psychologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. &quot;But I&#39;m not sure there are data to support that.&quot;</p><p>It&#39;s true that young adulthood can be a turbulent time &mdash; for folks from any generation, Prinstein says. So young people are&nbsp;<a href="http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/prevalence/major-depression-among-adults.shtml">more likely</a>&nbsp;than older adults to say they experienced a depressive episode in the past year.</p><p>But we can&#39;t really compare how depressed millennials are with how it was for our parents and grandparents when they were young. That&#39;s because researchers weren&#39;t very good at collecting data on mental illness back in the &#39;60s and &#39;70s, when the baby boomers were in their late teens and 20s. The federal government does have&nbsp;<a href="http://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUHmhfr2013/NSDUHmhfr2013.pdf">data</a>&nbsp;going back to the early 2000s, and depression rates haven&#39;t increased since then.</p><p>There are&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/suicide/statistics/aag.html">better stats</a>&nbsp;on suicide among young people. Suicide rates for young adults increased through the &#39;70s and &#39;80s, but started dropping off in the late &#39;90s and have continued to decrease. So, it seems young people these days don&#39;t have higher rates of suicide than generations past.</p><p>So where does this idea that millennials&#39; mental health is declining even come from? Prinstein thinks people get that impression because we milliennials are full of angst. That&#39;s not new. But unlike past generations,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2014/10/14/352979540/getting-some-me-time-why-millennials-are-so-individualistic">we like to broadcast</a>&nbsp;our angst.</p><p>&quot;Millennials are certainly using social media in a way that we haven&#39;t seen with other generations,&quot; Prinstein says. &quot;They&#39;re not as shy about sharing their anxieties online.&quot;</p><p>And we do have a lot of things to stress about, he says, like an uncertain employment future and student loans. But stress doesn&#39;t necessarily equate to depression.</p><p>&quot;Depression is a biologically and psychologically driven form of mental illness that is remarkably common,&quot; Prinstein notes, &quot;but that is not necessarily experienced by everybody who is experiencing distress.&quot;</p><p>Still, some, like&nbsp;<a href="http://cacsprd.web.virginia.edu/Psych/Faculty/Profile/Joseph-P-Allen">Joseph Allen</a>, a professor of psychology at the University of Virginia, are concerned. Allen, who specializes in adolescent psychology, says in many cases, parents have worked too hard to make it too easy for their millennial children.</p><p>Parents haven&#39;t challenged millennials to support themselves, he says, and millennials may find it difficult adjusting to adulthood. &quot;If you&#39;re living in the basement and playing video games because you can&#39;t get a job or you haven&#39;t been pushed to get a job, that&#39;s going to leave you feeling aimless and a bit at sea whether or not it counts as clinical depression in a formal way,&quot; Allen says.</p><p>But again, at this point there isn&#39;t any conclusive research to prove that millennials feel especially listless or unfulfilled.</p><p>In any case, Gen Y is doing some things right when it comes to mental health, Prinstein says. Young people are generally more comfortable discussing mental health these days, he notes. And that helps reduce stigma so more people who really need mental health care are getting it.</p><p>&quot;So I&#39;m not sure if it&#39;s fair to characterize millennials as a group as poorly prepared to deal with life,&quot; Prinstein says. &quot;They&#39;re differently prepared.&quot;</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/10/12/446928518/is-the-resilience-of-millennials-underrated?ft=nprml&amp;f=446928518" target="_blank"><em>via NPR</em></a></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 12 Oct 2015 09:57:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/resilience-millennials-underrated-113281 Swipe right for ... your next job? http://www.wbez.org/programs/marketplace/2015-10-07/swipe-right-your-next-job-113225 <p><p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">The search for jobs &ndash; and for qualified applicants to fill those jobs &ndash; moved online years ago.</span></p><p style="margin: 1.42857em 0px; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Now, job hunters and employers have discovered the power of the smartphone swipe. In much the same way as people use Tinder, the swipe is being put to good use in the context of the job market.</p><p><img alt="" id="1" src="http://www.marketplace.org/sites/default/files/styles/primary-image-766x447/public/levine.JPG?itok=e1S2oZbe" style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; text-align: center; height: 175px; width: 300px; float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" title="27-year-old Arielle Levine of Santa Monica currently has a job in digital marketing, but she is looking for her next job on an app called Jobr. (Marketplace/Brian Watt)" typeof="foaf:Image" /></p><p style="margin: 1.42857em 0px; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">27-year-old Arielle Levine has a job but is looking for another one in the field of digital marketing. She&rsquo;s a devotee of an app called Jobr, which she downloaded a few weeks ago. Levine says she might spend an hour in a Santa Monica coffee shop sifting through job openings on her smartphone.</p><p style="margin: 1.42857em 0px; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">&ldquo;If I&rsquo;m on for an hour, I might swipe 15 rights and 5 lefts,&rdquo; she said. Swiping left means she&rsquo;s taking a pass. Swiping right means she&rsquo;s applying for the job, and it&rsquo;s quickly communicated to the hiring manager who posted the job listing.</p><p style="margin: 1.42857em 0px; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">&ldquo;I think the swipe is such an awesome feature. It&rsquo;s fun. It&rsquo;s creative. And It really lets me have the power,&rdquo; said Levine, a communications major from the University of Arizona.</p><p style="margin: 1.42857em 0px; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">That power is not something she&rsquo;s accustomed to feeling as a job hunter. When she was looking for a job a year ago, she filled out plenty of long and tedious applications online and never heard back from the employers. Levine says she felt like just another resume in a cyber-stack and wondered if a human ever even saw her submission.</p><p style="margin: 1.42857em 0px; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">&ldquo;Then I got this app. It&rsquo;s been two weeks, I&rsquo;ve already had two interviews lined up,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m just really exposed to jobs that would have never come my way if I&rsquo;d just tried looking on other job recruiting sites.&rdquo;</p><p style="margin: 1.42857em 0px; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Jobr launched in May of last year and its creators say it recently passed 50 million job views. Like Jobr, Switch also offers a quick and easy process to create a profile using a resume or a LinkedIn account. Then there&rsquo;s also Anthology, which used to be called &lsquo;Poachable&rsquo;.</p><p style="margin: 1.42857em 0px; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">And coming very soon to the app store: JobSnap, which specifically targets Generation Z (22 years and younger). The app by-passes the resume &ndash; since most people in this age group don&rsquo;t have a lot to put on one &ndash; and instead allows each young job-seeker to create and upload a 30-second video for potential employers.</p><p style="margin: 1.42857em 0px; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Boodie.jpg" style="height: 250px; width: 250px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: left;" title="30-year-old Jeff Boodie has created JobSnap for Gen Z job seekers and the industries looking for young workers fast. (Brian Watt)" />JobSnap creator Jeff Boodie is building on his experience in recruiting for companies like Dreamworks Animation and a start-up known as Intern Sushi. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re basically creating a platform for the next generation of first-time job-seekers who love technology and have stories to tell,&rdquo; Boodie said.</p><p style="margin: 1.42857em 0px; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">But he&rsquo;s also focused on businesses like restaurants, hotels and retailers which need to quickly find young employees with people skills. &ldquo;In 30 seconds, you&rsquo;re able to quickly decide if this is somebody you want because you&rsquo;ve already seen them and then you can quickly take the next step.&rdquo;</p><p style="margin: 1.42857em 0px; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Todd Raphael, editor-in-chief at ERE Media, a recruiting information firm, says companies that pay to list jobs on most job-searching apps are mainly in industries where the competition for talent is fierce, like the tech sector.</p><p style="margin: 1.42857em 0px; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">&ldquo;Companies want to convey to job seekers just through the job application process that &#39;yeah, we&rsquo;re hip we&rsquo;re cool, we&rsquo;re with it,&rsquo;&nbsp;&mdash;&nbsp;that this application process is somewhat emblematic of what it&rsquo;s like to work there,&rdquo; Raphael said.</p><p style="margin: 1.42857em 0px; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">But he says there&rsquo;s a risk to companies paying too much to list job openings that will only be seen and clicked on via smartphone. &ldquo;People are less likely to finish their job applications when they start them on a smartphone versus when they start them on a laptop or desktop with keys like we used to use in the old days,&rdquo; he said.</p><p style="margin: 1.42857em 0px; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, 'DejaVu Serif', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">&mdash; <em><a href="http://www.marketplace.org/topics/economy/swipe-right-your-next-job" target="_blank">via Marketplace</a></em></p></p> Wed, 07 Oct 2015 12:57:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/marketplace/2015-10-07/swipe-right-your-next-job-113225 Meet the Obama-era kids who are about to be first-time voters http://www.wbez.org/news/meet-obama-era-kids-who-are-about-be-first-time-voters-113195 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/9025680314_d707011b1d_z.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Young people loved President Obama in 2008 &mdash; they turned out to support him more than any other recent Democratic presidential nominee.</p><div id="res446129590" previewtitle="Older millennials, ages 25-29, many of whom were first-time voters in 2008, seem to lean more left than younger millennials, who will cast their first vote in 2016. (Percentages are rounded and may add up to more than 100.)"><div><img alt="Older millennials, ages 25-29, many of whom were first-time voters in 2008, seem to lean more left than younger millennials, who will cast their first vote in 2016. (Percentages are rounded and may add up to more than 100.)" src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/millennial-party-affiliation-by-age_chartbuilder_custom-933dfe219d7631ddea797c1032099d73ea78714d-s300-c85.png" style="height: 342px; width: 300px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: right;" title="Older millennials, ages 25-29, many of whom were first-time voters in 2008, seem to lean more left than younger millennials, who will cast their first vote in 2016. Percentages are rounded and may add up to more than 100. (Source: Harvard Institute of Politics)" /><p>But now, there&#39;s a new crop of young voters &mdash; the kids who came of age during the Obama presidency. They&#39;re are all grown up, and getting their first chance to vote for president.</p></div></div><p>They grew up in a different era &mdash; after Sept. 11 attacks and in the middle of the recession.</p><p>There&#39;s some indication that younger millennial voters are not as left-leaning as their big brothers and sisters. However, more still identify as Democrat than Republican, and a lot can change before they cast their first vote for president in 2016.</p><p>We asked first-time voters to share their earliest political memories, and we heard about praying for George W. Bush, family members losing jobs, fears of terrorism and the&nbsp;Daily Show. Here&#39;s what they had to say:</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>What Was Your Earliest Political Memory?</strong></span></p><div><p>We met first-time voters at the University of New Hampshire and at Harvard&#39;s Institute of Politics conference, which brought in college students from across the country.</p></div><h4><strong>Justin Miller, 20, Nottingham, N.H.,&nbsp;<span style="text-align: justify;">Student at University of New Hampshire</span></strong></h4><p style="text-align: justify;">&quot;Every night my dad would gather us up. I was probably 8. And we would actually pray for George Bush, that God would just give him clarity to make the right decisions and stuff like that, &#39;cause I&#39;ve always believed that prayer has a lot of power to it. So that probably would be my first political, just, like, realizing what a president is. He has a lot of power. Like, that&#39;s the reason why I&#39;m praying for him.&quot;</p><p><img alt="Miller wouldn't say whether he's a Republican or a Democrat, but said he identifies with whoever he thinks &quot;Jesus would vote for if he were still walking the earth, and that's something I kind of see in [Ben] Carson.&quot;" class="img" src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/justin_sq-37a61a2549085c749d49fd2a585ac02790a831f5-s300-c85.jpg" style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 10px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; max-width: none; display: block; float: left; height: 290px; width: 290px;" title="Miller wouldn't say whether he's a Republican or a Democrat, but said he identifies with whoever he thinks &quot;Jesus would vote for if he were still walking the earth, and that's something I kind of see in [Ben] Carson.&quot; (Asma Khalid/NPR)" /></p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="290" scrolling="no" src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/446006485/446012136"></iframe></p><div><div><hr /><h4><strong>Shannon Pierce, 21, Cleveland,&nbsp;<span style="text-align: justify;">Student at Tennessee State University</span></strong></h4><p style="text-align: justify;">&quot;Obama won his second term when I was a freshman at Tennessee State University. And people were excited. And people loved Obama. But why? They liked Obama simply because he looked like us. And that is unacceptable. Because he literally could have had any viewpoint and they would have loved it. So when I realized how politically illiterate my campus was, that was an issue. We can&#39;t have that. So that&#39;s when I began to care.&quot;</p><img alt="Anna Del Castillo (from left), Shannon Pierce and Phillip David Ellison. Pierce identifies as independent and is deeply concerned about mass incarceration. She doesn't love any of the candidates, but, at this point, she said she would probably go with Hillary Clinton." class="img" src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/shannon_sq-82943c40ad444d688ceb9382b107963dfd71dd37-s300-c85.jpg" style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 10px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; max-width: none; display: block; float: left; height: 290px; width: 290px;" title="From left, Anna Del Castillo, Shannon Pierce and Phillip David Ellison. Pierce identifies as independent and is deeply concerned about mass incarceration. She doesn't love any of the candidates, but, at this point, she said she would probably go with Hillary Clinton. (Asma Khalid/NPR)" /><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="290" scrolling="no" src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/446006485/446106959"></iframe></p><hr /><h4><strong>Stephen Miller, 19, Boston,&nbsp;<span style="text-align: justify;">Student at UNH</span></strong></h4><div><p style="text-align: justify;">&quot;The economic crisis &mdash; &#39;08, &#39;09 &mdash; I was 12 years old, and my uncle actually lost his job because he worked for a private student loan firm in Boston, and there were new regulations passed in Congress that made that industry almost impossible to really operate and be profitable in, so they cut like 90 percent of their employees and he just happened to be one of them.&quot;</p></div><img alt="Miller is a Republican who says the economy is one of his major concerns because he wants to graduate into a &quot;thriving, booming economy, so I can easily get a job and get my foot in the door.&quot;" class="img" src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/stephen_sq-d4ff3aae7feebd79609586acc5071dc96f40a828-s300-c85.jpg" style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 10px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; max-width: none; display: block; float: left; height: 290px; width: 290px;" title="Miller is a Republican who says the economy is one of his major concerns because he wants to graduate into a &quot;thriving, booming economy, so I can easily get a job and get my foot in the door.&quot; (Asma Khalid/NPR)" /><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="290" scrolling="no" src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/446006485/446013973"></iframe></p><hr /><p><strong>Abby Pokraka, 19, Falmouth, Mass.,&nbsp;<span style="text-align: justify;">Student at UNH</span></strong></p></div><div><p style="text-align: justify;">&quot;The 9/11 attacks and, like, George W. Bush trying to, like, console the American public and trying to, you know, be like a father figure almost and just tell everyone that it&#39;s going to be OK, and everything like that. And he also just, like, went right into Afghanistan to take out the terrorists and, like, assure the American public that, like, we were OK and that precautions would be taken to, like, secure the nation.&quot;</p><img alt="Pokraka grew up in a Republican family and identifies with the GOP, but said she's intrigued by Hillary Clinton because &quot;she dealt with her husband's presidency and everything that happened with that and she still held her head high.&quot;" class="img" src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/abby_sq-693c340fad29938fdff6c999df8dd8b18ee038d8-s300-c85.jpg" style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 10px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; max-width: none; display: block; float: left; height: 290px; width: 290px;" title="Pokraka grew up in a Republican family and identifies with the GOP, but said she's intrigued by Hillary Clinton because &quot;she dealt with her husband's presidency and everything that happened with that and she still held her head high.&quot; (Asma Khalid/NPR)" /><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="290" scrolling="no" src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/446006485/446081363"></iframe></p></div><hr /><div><h4><strong>Anna Del Castillo, 19, Ocean Springs, Miss.,&nbsp;<span style="text-align: justify;">Student at Tufts University</span></strong></h4><p style="text-align: justify;">&quot;I grew up in south Mississippi, with different views from a lot of my classmates. And for me, it wasn&#39;t just presidential elections, but local politics. The people who were coming into office, who were posting things on Facebook about their platform that were very much anti-immigrant, very much anti-LGBTQ rights and things like that, and for me that wasn&#39;t OK and I wanted to have a voice. Even if I was representing a small portion of my community, I still wanted my voice to be heard.&quot;</p><img alt="Del Castillo supports the Black Lives Matter movement and said immigration reform is an important issue to her. She said she likes Hillary Clinton but is a &quot;big supporter&quot; of Bernie Sanders because of his &quot;inclusive policies.&quot;" class="img" src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/anna_sq-e041ed1befbd813759c89c33d601b3baaeeb4fcc-s300-c85.jpg" style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 10px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; max-width: none; display: block; height: 300px; width: 300px; float: left;" title="Del Castillo supports the Black Lives Matter movement and said immigration reform is an important issue to her. She said she likes Hillary Clinton but is a &quot;big supporter&quot; of Bernie Sanders because of his &quot;inclusive policies.&quot; (Asma Khalid/NPR)" /><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="290" scrolling="no" src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/446006485/446107342"></iframe></p><div><hr /><h4 style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Halie </strong><strong>Vilagi</strong><strong>, 20, Amherst, Ohio,&nbsp;Student at Ohio State University</strong></h4><p>&quot;Well, I grew up watching&nbsp;The&nbsp;Colbert Report&nbsp;and Jon Stewart, and that&#39;s kind of how I made my introduction to politics at a very young age.&quot;</p><h4><img alt="Vilagi identifies as a Republican because of the economy. In 2008, she said, she skipped school to watch President Obama's inauguration because &quot;I was so excited about him being elected.&quot; But after eight years, she said, she's shifted to the right because she's &quot;disenchanted&quot; with some of the Democratic policies and the &quot;lack of change that's been made.&quot;" class="img" src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/hallie_sq-919b354481a25edca3986a0d9c0dcc1ff4ee12c1-s300-c85.jpg" style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 10px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; max-width: none; display: block; height: 290px; width: 290px; float: left;" title="Vilagi identifies as a Republican because of the economy. In 2008, she said, she skipped school to watch President Obama's inauguration because &quot;I was so excited about him being elected.&quot; But after eight years, she said, she's shifted to the right because she's &quot;disenchanted&quot; with some of the Democratic policies and the &quot;lack of change that's been made.&quot; (Asma Khalid/NPR)" /></h4><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="290" scrolling="no" src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/446006485/446108103"></iframe></p></div></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/itsallpolitics/2015/10/06/446006485/meet-the-obama-era-kids-who-are-about-to-be-first-time-voters?ft=nprml&amp;f=446006485" target="_blank"><em> via NPR</em></a></p></p> Tue, 06 Oct 2015 10:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/meet-obama-era-kids-who-are-about-be-first-time-voters-113195